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BTR Live Studio
One minute rife with warm and contagious dance-pop beats, the next minute boasting edgy rock riffs, Kodacrome’s songs are full of relentless energy and shimmery appeal. The trio’s knack for strong pop melodies make for airy synth-rock soundscapes, while frontwoman Elissa Pociask’s rich and raspy vocals have a seductive texture to them, reminiscent of Beach House’s Victoria Legrand.
Baltimore-based band Gary B & the Notions play loud and spunky indie-rock that’s full of bold, crunchy guitar riffs intertwined with catchy, power-pop melodies. Made up of Gary Lee Barrett, Jr., Kristofor Heath, Rick Bowman and Bryan Elliott, the four-piece has shared the stage with the likes of Joan Jett, Sufjan Stevens and Of Montreal. Their latest record, How Do We Explode, was recorded by friend and fellow musician J Mendicino of Pretty & Nice.
Blurring the lines between genres, Emily Wells is a New York-based musician who channels hip-hop, synth rock, pop and even classical music. Her songs are at once sentimental, hypnotizing and electrifying. Though she’s been dubbed a hybrid of Nina Simone, Biggie Smalls and Bob Dylan, on stage Wells offers her own uniquely impressive one-woman show, playing a number of instruments and looping them live throughout her entire set. Here she performs a brand new song called “Come To Me.”
Sampling everything from city traffic and car horns to laser-esque zaps and echoing chimes, Deastro takes electronic-pop to another level. Detroit’s Randolph Chabot Jr. — the man behind the moniker — creates unique musical atmospheres with his synth-driven songs, each full of intense, swirling hurricanes of sound layered atop pop melodies. Sometimes the music is frenetic, glitchy and loud; other times it’s relaxed, spacious and dreamy.
This Is The Kit is the project of English-born singer-songwriter Kate Sables. Based out of Paris and often accompanied by longtime collaborator Jesse Vernon, she plays folk-rock that is sparse, stripped-down, and marked by a captivatingly tender and calm ambiance. Sables has been lauded by artists like Sharon Van Etten, and she is currently signed to Brassland Records, the label co-founded by The National’s Aaron and Bryce Dessner.
Originally a duo featuring Holly Laessig and Jess Wolfe, Brooklyn’s Lucius now has four permanent members and performs with a rotating fifth. Their charming indie-pop borrows mostly from country and folk, but their songs vary in mood and style — some are quirky and frenetic (reminiscent of St. Vincent), while others are sparse and delicate (like Feist). Though they sing heartbreaking tales, it’s the powerful, yet tender, harmonies of Laessig and Wolfe that make the music especially poignant.
Marked by beautiful, lush orchestration and impassioned, whispery vocals, Ravens & Chimes’ indie rock is enthralling and emotionally compelling. The Brooklyn five-piece has opened for bands like Billy Bragg and Tim Fite, and their honest, heart-on-the-sleeve songs — three of which have been featured on MTV’s Skins — have earned praise from musical icons Leonard Cohen and Jeff Mangum. Just recently, they were listed as one of The L Magazine’s “8 Bands You Need To Hear.”
Originally starting as a duo featuring Rusty Matyas (of The Waking Eyes and The Weakerthans) and Marti Sarbit, Imaginary Cities have evolved into a five-piece. The Winnipeg-based group does indie rock that fuses synth-pop and Motown-esque vibes. Sarbit’s soulful and uniquely-textured voice is especially captivating, even sassy at times. In 2011, they were a longlisted nominee for Canada’s prestigious Polaris Music Prize.
Berlin-based trio Fenster play charming chamber-pop. Despite eerie stories of graveyards and ghosts, their songs are minimalistic and calming, marked by their sparse, soft-spoken tenderness. The band also has its fair share of sweeping, climactic moments often accentuated by an assortment of sounds like rattling tambourines and emphatic handclaps. Here, they even use our studios’ sprinklers as an instrument.

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