Brooklyn band Teletextile features sweetly-sung, melodic vocals, sincere lyrics, and a unique range of instruments, from harp and violin to banjo and accordion. Here, the band is featured playing in the choir loft of the First Unitarian Universalist Congregational Society church in Brooklyn Heights.
NYC-based El Jezel have been together for nearly a decade, combining elements of glimmering, wistful shoegaze and charging, melodic post-rock. The blend of male and female vocals, along with their ability to waver between various genres mid-song, keeps their music unpredictable and refreshing. For our BTR Hear and There Christmas Special, in front of a brightly decorated Brooklyn home, they brave the cold winter weather to perform (as a duo) an acoustic version of their holiday tune, “Working On Christmas.”
Julie Rozanksy, Kelly Irene Corson, and Lisa La are veterans of local NYC/Brooklyn bands The Art Of Shooting and Religious To Damn -- projects where matching meticulously-crafted melodies to heady dissonance in an often aggressive, post-punk musical setting was the recurring norm. Now the trio brings their collective talents for matching melodies with dissonant counterpoints to this project, while somehow managing to mix in a different, quieter sense of urgency. For this shoot, we attempted to match the ominous tone the group haswrapped around the, at heart, seemingly hopeful message of the song.
Brooklyn’s Bel Air is a sometimes-folky, alt-country rock band featuring sweet, harmonic vocals, smooth guitars, and a knack for writing catchy tunes. Here, they play “Wash Away” at a vintage hat shop in Dumbo called Cha Cha’s House Of Ill Repute.
When indie-folk musician Audrey Ryan performs live, she often switches between numerous instruments like the accordion, banjo, and electric guitar, looping and using each one as a layer for her songs. Although she’s only one person, with all of these parts combined — including her delicate and warm vocals — her music immediately builds up to a more robust and enveloping sound, similar to the full orchestration that accompanies artists like Bon Iver or Sufjan Stevens. For this episode of BTR Hear & There, Ryan played around the corner from Pete’s Candy Store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where she later performed and celebrated the release of her book The Need To Be Heard, a collection of stories for and about DIY musicians like herself.
The Loom is a six-piece indie rock band from Brooklyn featuring male and female vocals, horns, guitars, banjo, ukulele, keys and percussion. In one of their "four word" CMJ reviews, The New York Times Arts Beat blog described The Loom as, "Appalachian garment, angst-y stitching."
Octant is a synth-pop project comprised entirely of mastermind Matthew Steinke and a merry band of robotically-played instruments. The homemade blip-bleeping creations are genius and a sight to see, especially in a place like Sycamore -- a Ditmas Park, Brooklyn, bar that also happens to double as a flowershop -- where the rustic atmosphere brings out the surprising warmth of the robotics. The bots’ whimsical tunes combined with Steinke’s singer-songwriter tone give Octant a refreshingly futuristic sound -- one that, despite all the metal and machines, feels warm and charming.
New Hampshire-born singer-songwriter Andrew St. Aubin, formerly of the indie-pop band Aldenbarton, is now embarking on a new project called Son of the Granite State. A talented multi-instrumentalist, here he demonstrates his masterful piano chops and ability to croon out a contemplative tune. Many thanks to the Yamaha Piano Salon in midtown Manhattan for providing the room full of baby grands.
Drawing from the likes of Feist, Broken Social Scene, and Iron & Wine, Sarah Aument is a folk singer-songwriter whose work is powerfully moving, raw with sincerity, and beautifully straight-forward. Emotions easily shine through Aument’s sparse and tender songs as her heart-felt narratives quickly grow from soft-spoken, introspective musings into loud, robust rock frenzies.
After leaving indie band Le Loup, guitarist May Tabol started a new project called Pree. Their name a reference to the Neutral Milk Hotel song, “A Baby for Pree,” the D.C.-based group play charming and quaint folk. The instrumentation is warm and rustic, showered with the occasional bright tinkling of bells and tambourines, while Tabol’s front woman vocals are richly textured and feature a quirky bend reminiscent of Joanna Newsom. With music fit for a cozy cabin, Pree sounded right at home when they played at Brooklyn’s Permanent Records, a store with a tight squeeze and intimate ambiance where any audiophile can easily find comfort.
New Hampshire-born singer-songwriter Andrew St. Aubin, formerly of the indie-pop band Aldenbarton, is now embarking on a new project called Son of the Granite State. A talented multi-instrumentalist, here he demonstrates his masterful piano chops and ability to croon out a contemplative ditty, his own playing accompanied by a player piano he programmed himself -- one of many in a room of baby grands at the Yamaha Piano Salon in midtown Manhattan.
Octant is a synth-pop project comprised entirely of mastermind Matthew Steinke and a merry band of robotically-played instruments. The homemade blip-bleeping creations are genius and a sight to see, especially in a place like Sycamore -- a Ditmas Park, Brooklyn, bar that also happens to double as a flowershop -- where the rustic atmosphere brings out the surprising warmth of the robotics.
The Two Man Gentlemen Band has a new two-song 7" vinyl being released on September 20th. One of those songs is "Tikka Masala," which they played for us at the Jalopy Theatre in Red Hook, Brooklyn. The Gents play retro music that harkens back to decades past -- but not pre-millennial so much as pre-war. Their old-timey tunes may be of a vintage style, but they definitely manage to incorporate themes that are as relevant today as ever.
Nine-piece, New Orleans-inspired Sister Sparrow and The Dirty Birds perform their sultry song "Hollow Bones" at Molloy's Irish Pub in New York's Hell's Kitchen. How many band members can you fit on a single bar? Watch to find out.
The Two Man Gentlemen Band plays retro music that harkens back to decades past -- but not pre-millennial so much as pre-war. Their old-timey tunes may be of a vintage style, but they definitely manage to incorporate themes that are as relevant today as ever. Ever the consummate showmen, the duo took a bit of time out of their seemingly never-ending touring schedule to play a song for us at the Jalopy Theatre in Red Hook, Brooklyn.
Brooklyn’s Dinosaur Feathers create upbeat pop music with layers of harmonized vocals, grooved out melodies, and plenty of intricate and energetic rhythms. Their music is catchy, expertly-played, and lasting.
After a brief hiatus, Gold Streets was just back in the studio to record a couple of new songs. One of those is called, "Frequency," and features the band's signature sounds -- post-punk rhythms and shoegaze/new-wave guitars with dual male/female vocals. Here, they play that song at a DIY artspace in Bushwick, Brooklyn
Brooklyn’s Spanish Prisoners are about to release their sophomore album, ‘Gold Fools’ - a psychedelic pop record filled with a unique electronic ambiance. Here they play “Rich Blood” at Bushwick DIY space, the Schoolhouse.
y/y is a Brooklyn-based duo Jason Meeks and Conrad Burnham. Together they craft experimental rock music that weaves together sequenced and manipulated-on-the-fly beats and electronics with live guitars, percussion, and vocals (often pleasingly drenched in reverb). The results usually bob back and forth from ambient sounds to danceable beats and riffs. Here they perform in a Bushwick art and events space.
Mama Bear is a Brooklyn-based duo who plays pop music with a twang. Dale Pittner's bouncy riffs and Victoria Sounthavong's mellifluous voice combine to make for some very catchy tunes.
Originally hailing from New Jersey, Jonathan Pilkington Kahnt deals in a brand of songwriting that places sincerity at the forefront, relying on heartfelt lyrics and crooning capable of winning over even the most cynical of audiences.
Brooklyn's Alina Simone, originally from the Ukraine, plays folk music with a dark side. A powerful singer-songwriter, Simone here plays "Apocalyptic Lullaby" (from her new album, Make Your Own Danger) with her band on a balcony in Brooklyn.
Brooklyn’s Bel Air is a sometimes-folky, alt-country rock band featuring sweet, harmonic vocals, smooth guitars, and a knack for writing catchy tunes. Here, they play “Wash Away” at a vintage hat shop in Dumbo called Cha Cha’s House Of Ill Repute.
Brooklyn band Teletextile features sweetly-sung, melodic vocals, sincere lyrics, and a unique range of instruments, from harp and violin to banjo and accordion. Here, the band is featured playing in the choir loft of the First Unitarian Universalist Congregational Society church in Brooklyn Heights.
Don't miss our Hear & There episode with Johanna and the Dusty Floor as the band performs in Brooklyn in Johanna's home. The Australian born piano player's sound is a mix of electronic pop and symphony orchestra, and is something you won't want to miss.
Indie-rock band Automatic Children perform the unforgettable song, "Now You Know" at the KGB bar in NYC. Don't miss their remarkable live performance here at BreakThru radio.
Our first Hear & There episode is back for an encore. It's hard not to have fun when Japanther's around. A loud, merry, and unforgettable band, they make you want to get out on the dance floor. If you missed it, or if you just miss them, listen to their performance from Party Xpo in Brooklyn.
Listen as The Gypsy West unleash their "psychedelic" rock onto customers at the Main Drag. Performing at the guitar store in Bushwick, Brooklyn, the band lives up to their progressive nature.
Bronx native Rene Lopez and his band perform his Latin soul track "Honey Got Some Love" live at Mirror Image Salon in Harlem, New York.
Wisconsin-born Brooklyn transplant and self-proclaimed "video freak" Pezzettino steps in front of the Hear & There lens to perform "Falling Down" in the basement of Northeast Kingdom, a Bushwick eatery and favorite neighborhood haunt.

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