Archive
Nordish Wildfish is a company looking to cut down the amount of waste associated with fishing efforts.
Robot videos and political messages create a two-piece experimental band Job Creators, preaching to think about today’s issues in a new light.
The evolution of the technology that makes our lives easier is the same evolution that is making technology more dangerous. As AI and robotics become more complex, so too is the possibility of deviant behavior.
We are living in a science-fiction world. Want proof? Your pizza might be cooked by robots.
The gift and curse of smartphones in war zones, the annual charter school rally in New York City, and listener mail.  
A recent study performed at the University of California, Irvine has claimed that taking selfies is actually good for a person’s self esteem and can help lower stress.
Ford Motors has promised to get self-driving cars on the road in the next five years. By 2021, the company wants driverless vehicles to be the norm.
The BioRing is a forthcoming fitness tracker designed to monitor everything from sleep quality to calorie intake, all from your finger.
Some restaurant owners are taking advantage of the new Pokemon Go trend!
We talk about the latest technologies in surgery that are helping aid workers across the world.
We talk about the latest technologies in surgery that are helping aid workers across the world.
We talk about the latest technologies in surgery that are helping aid workers across the world.
We speak learn about a prominent third party candidate running for US presidency.
It spent more than 100 years in the museum’s collection before researchers discovered that the baby’s body was inside.
Meet Photon, the world’s first robot capable of growing alongside children and teaching them the basics of computer programming.
This high respect and compassionate perspective on pregnancy is something that should be universally duplicated within our culture.
The baby is the youngest ever example of a human fetus to be embalmed and buried in Egyptian society.
Archaeologists made an amazing discovery recently when they found the mummy of a tiny, 16- to 18-week gestation baby taken from a tomb in Egypt.
We speak with an egyptologist about a the youngest ancient Egyptian mummy ever found.
With America’s growing obesity problem, the lack of physical education in schools is disconcerting.
We discuss fully immersive storytelling, where the viewer no longer watches a story unfold, but is instead placed inside the scene with action taking place all around them.
We look into the inspiring and innovative work of virtual reality in storytelling.
TechDay was held at Pier 94 in Manhattan, had over 30,000 attendees, and featured over 550 innovative technology-related startups and companies.
Virtual reality can be used for anything from helping medical students perform open heart surgery, to touring refugee camps in Syria. Now, it can give us hyper realistic pornography.
We continue to chat with Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who hopes to start testing a DNA vaccine by September.
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, hopes to start testing a DNA vaccine by September.
Curator Matthew Abess discusses his new exhibition Margin of Error. The show features art and ephemera that speak to both the wonder and the hazards of industrial age technologies. The show includes everything from Fascist-era Italian safety posters to Photographs and graphic art about the dangers and power of electricity. Margin of Error is on view through May 8th at The Wolfsonian at Florida International University.
This week we get a lesson on the intersection of marketing, technology, social media, and (of course) Taylor Swift!
Our least favorite critters provide inspiration for scientists who are working to develop rescue robots based on the structure of the cockroach's exoskeleton.
NY Times Fitness columnist, Gretchen Reynolds, reveals to BTR the best science research for simplifying and improving daily workout.
An exploration into the personal use of body cameras and their ethical implications.
Nobody knows what the future might hold or what changes could uproot everything we know. BTR ‘s Zach Schepis and Lisa Autz take to the streets of Manhattan to ask people what aspects of our society they think are built to last.
Should researchers be allowed to alter human genes? BTR sits down with Elliot Hosman of the Center for Genetics and Society to discuss controversial advances in the field of genetic engineering and what they mean for the future of the human race.