Archive
Today we review the debut solo album from Jonathan Rado, one of the lead members of Foxygen. Law and Order, an ambitious production, was released on September 3rd by Woodsist Records. Rado covers a variety of genres including soul, funk, garage rock, 60s psychedelia, country folk, and noise in the LP, giving a new twist to classic compositions. The albums, experimental at points, is a great display of his musical range and prowess in production.
This week we review Chance the Rapper’s second LP, Acid Rap, self-released on April 30th. The 20-year-old, who took acid while writing the LP, touches upon a variety of musical genres, trap, juke, gospel, soul, ragtime, and more, an impressive effort for such a young mc. The album will arguably sustain the year, having recieved a flood of positive criticism already. I liked this album, I made this show long, my bad (xo Margaret.)
JuiceBox began in 2009 as the brainchild of NYC saxophonist Nick Myers and more recently solidified their soul/jazz party style with the addition of singer Lisa Ramey. The talented group of young musicians cut their teeth with parties and regular club nights to hone their explosive funk style, which has since taken them to a wide range of venues both at home and far away (they just returned from a tour of Italy). The group stopped by the studio to share their music and to talk about their beginnings, including how they made sweaty hipsters dance.
EMEFE is a lively 10-piece afro-rock band from New York City whose members boast some impressive history: Antibalas, Sharon Jones & the Dapkings, Soulive, Charles Bradley, TV on the Radio, Medeski Martin and Wood, etc. Their music is all about being free from worry and, with strong funk, soul, hip-hop, and rock influences in the mix, they also have a way of making audiences move. Here, packed into our studio, the group makes a great racket and chats with Maia about their band name and the philosophy behind the project.

recommendations