Archive
The law says rape is a crime but today’s society does not discourage rape as much as we think.
Protestors congregated and marched throughout midtown Manhattan protesting NSA surveillance.
Since the clashes between supporters and opponents of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, several human rights violations have been investigated. In the following videos BreakThruTV’s Lauren Hawker sits down with Tamara Alrifai, spokeswoman for Human Rights Watch’s Middle East and North Africa division about various issues facing the nation today.
On July 13, 2013, a jury in Sanford, Florida, acquitted George Zimmerman of the murder of Trayvon Martin, the 17 year old African American boy he admittedly shot and killed during an altercation in February 2012. Although the case put the state’s so-called “Stand Your Ground” law in the forefront of national debates, Zimmerman’s defense relied on a self defense argument and the shooting and trial have sparked many other discussions about the state of race relations in America. The day after the verdict, rallies were held across the nation; BTR Pulse’s Lauren Hawker visited one such rally in NYC’s Union Square, where she heard citizens speak out against the verdict — among them Bill de Blasio, Public Advocate for the city and mayoral hopeful, and Kevin Powell of BK Nation, a non-profit community organization. Hawker then spoke with others in the city the day after the event
On July 4, 2013, BreakThruTV’s Lauren Hawker spoke with people at a “Restore The Fourth” rally at NYC’s Union Square. Participants in the group call for an end to unconstitutional surveillance of digital communications by the U.S. government, basing their arguments on the Fourth Amendment of the Bill Of Rights.
Since the recent revelations that the National Security Agency is gathering data on Americans’ use of telephones and foreigners’ use of the internet, a debate has begun about the proper balance between national security and civil liberties. In the wake of the scandal, protesters held a rally in New York’s Union Square to show their support for Edward Snowden, the man who leaked the details. While many expressed their discomfort towards government surveillance of citizens, others offered a more favorable view. This week on BTR Pulse, Lauren Hawker speaks with people in New York on both sides of the debate.
Since the recent revelations that the National Security Agency is gathering data on Americans’ use of telephones and foreigners’ use of the internet, a debate has begun about the proper balance between national security and civil liberties. In the wake of the scandal, protesters held a rally in New York’s Union Square to show their support for Edward Snowden, the man who leaked the details. While many expressed their discomfort towards government surveillance of citizens, others offered a more favorable view. This week on BTR Pulse, Lauren Hawker speaks with people in New York on both sides of the debate.
We’re back from vacation with stories of classwar and revolution from Paris. Also, coverage of the Guantanamo Bay hunger strike has intensified, and the problems with all those marriage equality avatars on Facebook.
Time for our first Radio Dispatch book club. Today, we spend the hour discussing bell hooks’ Feminism is for Everybody, including a bunch of listener feedback.
Chris Faraone on the closing of the alt-weekly The Boston Phoenix, and the paper’s amazing history. Also, the new form of school segregation, and listener mail. And this is our first vacation show to air.
Over 1,000 attend Kimani Gray’s wake on Friday, and activists hold a march in East Flatbush on Sunday. Also, tons of listener mail, and this is the last regular show before we go on vacation.
Alexis Goldstein joins us to explain the latest crimes of JP Morgan, how they get away with it, and what might stop them. Also, Andrew “Weev” Auernheimer gets three and a half years in federal prison, and listener mail. Theradiodispatch.com theradiodispatch@gmail.com facebook.com/TheRadioDispatch twitter.com/Radio_Dispatch donateyouraccount.com/RadioDispatch 00:00 Welcome to Radio Dispatch 00:28 We don’t get finance 12:28 Alexis Goldstein gets finance 30:34 Weev’s story 58:16 “I fought the law” The Clash / Credits 59:24 Finish Alexis Goldstein Jamie Dimon Weev
It’s the tenth anniversary of the beginning of the Iraq War, and little has changed in the overall media landscape. We discuss the coverage from 2003, where we were at the time, and where things stand now.
Ryan Devereaux on the increasingly complicated case of Kimani Gray, the 16 year old who was shot and killed earlier this month by the NYPD. Also, a hunger strike grows at Guantanamo Bay, and listener mail.
On the ground reports from the vigil for Kimani Gray that became known as the Brooklyn Protest. Also, we have like five listener mails to get to.

recommendations