Archive
President
It's our Christmas Day show! Today's show is a best-of show, which includes Sam Osterhout reading from his book Memos to Ruby, and a strange interview with Fanny Faye, the insecure chef.
Ryan Devereaux on the dangers of Zero Dark Thirty, and the National Review thinks men would have stopped the Sandy Hook shooting.
Time names Obama person of the year, the appalling lack of emotion for Muslims killed in the drone program, and the dangers of relying on terms like “criminal” and “mentally ill” when discussing gun control. Also, you guessed it, awesome listener mail.
In the wake of the mass shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, on Friday, December 14th, a familiar debate began about the causes of the tragedy. At an interfaith vigil held two days later, President Obama pledged to use his office to make an effort to prevent similar incidents from occurring in the future. We asked people in New York what they thought of the President’s remarks and about what they think can be done.
Joe Markowitz offers ways for citizens irritated by unfair tax cuts to act.
Mike Konczal on the poorly named Fiscal Cliff: what it is and where Obama stands on it, both positive and negative. Also, a new study on gender representation in TV and movies.
A new study sheds light on the harsh working conditions domestic workers face, the judge in Jeremy Hammond's case has a conflict of interest, and the US Navy assures the Internet that a human will always decide when a robot will kill you. And still more great listener mail.
Revisiting the Runaway General, the Michael Hastings story that ended Stanley McCrystal's career as a general, a refresher on drones, and a black Florida teenager is gunned down in his car, allegedly after a confrontation with a middle aged white man. Plus, more listener mail than you can shake a stick at.
Anna Lekas Miller joins us to discuss the deteriorating conditions in Gaza, and The Nation's Josh Eidelson reports on the upcoming Black Friday strikes that Walmart workers are organizing. Also, Jamel Mims on stop and frisk and mass incarceration.
Strike Debt raised enough money to abolish over 5 million dollars in debt, Palestinian rights organizations protest Israeli bombardments of Gaza, and Teach For America claims to aspire to reform education through electoral politics.
Today's show is all about police repression of Arab and Muslim communities, and activist groups as well.
Occupy Sandy establishes an outpost in the still suffering Midland Beach area in Staten Island, and Jezebel shames high schoolers who posted racist tweets after Obama's reelection. This show is about natural disasters, race, and privilege.
Why liberals should not tout Obama's Pyrrhic victory as the end of conservatism as we know it.
Efforts to provide relief to the Rockaways continue, and John was on the ground to witness some of it. Also, Occupy's effect on the election, and Glenn Beck's website offers praise for Occupy Sandy.
Michael Tracey on voter disenfranchisement in New Jersey following Superstorm Sandy. Also, Occupy Sandy is getting a lot of well-deserved good press. Our thoughts on why Occupy is so well suited to deliver relief to those affected by the storm.
On the ground interviews from Staten Island and Rockaway Beach, as we take you to some of the places in New York City that have been hardest hit. Today's show is all about people telling their own stories about how Sandy changed their lives.
Our coverage of Sandy's effects on New York City continues, with Chris Robbins of Gothamist reporting on the massive destruction on Staten Island, and Nick Pinto of the Village Voice on continuing power outages in Red Hook. Also, Molly's got a new essay about structural oppression and education.
Photos of the raceway before yesterday's announcement to cancel the marathon.
Cannibal cop wanted to kidnap, cook, and eat one hundred women, the future of warfare is lethal autonomous robots, and Mitt Romney's comments as Governor about same-sex parents.
Chase Madar, author of The Passion of Bradley Manning, on Manning's detention, trans identity, and the overlap of foreign policy and mass incarceration. Also, Richard Mourdock's “God intended that” rape comments, and a new agency that codifies global secret war.
Ever since Ronald Reagan asked voters to consider, “Are You Better Off Than You Were Four Years Ago?,” during his 1984 campaign for reelection and they answered by returning him to the White House in a landslide, the question has been a benchmark for voters to consider every presidential election cycle. Given the shaky state of the country when President Obama took office in 2008, we decided to ask people their thoughts about this quadrennial concern as they consider whether to give him another term or turn to his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney.
Labor reporter Josh Eidelson joins us to discuss the Walmart strikes happening across the country, the possibility of a mass coordinated disruption of Black Friday, and the power and vulnerability of labor in the United States. Plus, John is going to Guantanamo Bay! Also, a listener points out Obama's condescending language when talking about women's issues.
Ever since Ronald Reagan asked voters to consider, “Are You Better Off Than You Were Four Years Ago?,” during his 1984 campaign for reelection and they answered by returning him to the White House in a landslide, the question has been a benchmark for voters to consider every presidential election cycle. Given the shaky state of the country when President Obama took office in 2008, we decided to ask people their thoughts about this quadrennial concern as they consider whether to give him another term or turn to his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney.
How the candidates are besting each other on Twitter.
Hundreds gathered outside the U.N. to protest Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
Why immigration reform isn't Obama's biggest failure and why no one should expect the DREAM Act to pass by 2016.
Ali Gharib joins us to discuss Middle East protests and Romney's secret remarks about Israel and Palestine.
The Free Wood post Editor-In-Chief talks providing political satire with news that's "almost reliable."
How open source is changing the relationships between citizen and government, game and gamer.
The blame game over the economy roles on as Washington contemplates separating investment and commercial banking.
“Making beer in a big facility is all automatic. We’re doing this by hand,” -Mark Daniels, microbrewer

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