Archive
On November 26, 2012, TBWA/Chiat/Day hosted a launch party for photographer Rose Hartman’s new book, Incomparable Women Of Style. Before the event, BreakThruTV’s Lauren Hawker spoke with Rose about the book and her career, during which she has photographed a number of celebrities, models, and fashionistas — Jacqueline Onassis, Kate Moss, Bianca Jagger, Naomi Campbell, and Lauren Hutton among them — and been a fixture at such famed hot spots as Studio 54.
This week on Art Uncovered I speak with artist Allison Sommers. Her new show, Ellipsis, includes videos, an installation and photographs inspired by her travels in Cypress and Tuscany. The exhibition is on view through December 17th at Microscope Gallery in Brooklyn.
This week, somewhere in Kazakhstan, a satellite called EchoStar XVI will launch into geosynchronous orbit 24,000 miles above the earth. Attached to that satellite is a silicon disk with 100 images etched into it’s surface. The images depict snippets of life on Earth, and they may one day explain to their discoverer the fate of the lost civilization that sent them into space.
We talk to the photographer behind PopSpotsNYC, a site that celebrates of pop album cover photos taken in NYC.
It’s App Week on BTR! Featured guests on today’s episode include Justin Ouellette, Director of Special Projects at Tumblr. He’s here to give us the scoop on a brand new app from Tumblr called Photoset, which helps you “create and share beautiful hi-res photosets on your iPhone or iPad.”
On photojournalism and what it takes to really expose the severity of war.
An interview with Morrigan McCarthy of Restless Collective, a photography and multimedia collective.
Gagan Singh on the mass shooting in Wisconsin, Russell Brand forces woman to show breasts, NYT photographer arrested while shooting in the Bronx.
Justin Berry is an artist based in Bushwick Brooklyn. And for his latest project he’s been taking landscape photographs inside war-themed video games. Much like the way landscape photographers like Ansel Adams explored the landscape in search of the perfect scene, Justin navigates the world of first person shooters using the screen has his camera. At first glance these virtual landscapes look just like black and white photos. It’s only when you start to look closely and notice a pixel here, or a gun lying behind a rock, that the fiction becomes clear
Meryl Meisler has been taking photos of the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn for the last 30 years. Today the neighborhood is a hot bed for artists in New York City, but in the early 80s when Meryl starting coming to the neighborhood to teach art, Bushwick was in disarray. The neighborhood was hit hard by the riots and looting that followed the 1977 black out and never really recovered. When Meryl took at job teaching at one of Bushwick’s public schools, she was confronted on a daily basis with burned out and abandoned buildings, gangs, drugs, all the things that epitomize urban decay. What stood out among all the destruction were the people who continued to thrive and carve out rich communities for themselves and their families. On her walks between the subway and school, Meryl began taking photos of people going about their lives on the streets of Bushwick and continued the practice until 1994 when she left her teaching job.
Sure, Facebook stocks went public last weekend, and Zuckerberg got married (the day after, ew), but he doesn’t have the entrepreneurial field cornered. There are so many other innovative minds and projects going on in every field today, including fashion! For example… the boutique franchise Apricot Lane! Brainchild of two former firefighters, Ken Petersen and Tom Brady, Apricot Lane is a national chain of over 90 unique storefronts. Each one offers its owner the opportunity to make decisions for themselves about inventory and presentation, yet the have the undeniable benefits of stability and support that come along with an established name. Stores from MN to TX, NY to CA stock brands like TOM’S, Sanctuary, 7 For All Mankind, and Lucky Brand Jeans, alongside smaller up-and-coming local labels and designers. It’s a revolutionary retail model that is taking the U.S. by storm, and on today’s show, founder and CEO Ken Petersen will tell the story of going from firefighting to furniture to fashion, who the Apricot Lane women (and men) are, some of the lessons he’s learned as the stores have grown, and an exciting new project that the company has launched in Cambodia. Plus, new music from several under-the-radar talents, including Kelly Hogan, King Tuff, and River City Extension! So turn up that radio, and get ready to be inspired!
Now in its 11th year, the Affordable Art Fair brought new and emerging art to New York City that even the most cash-strapped art lover can enjoy. The four-day event — which travels around the world to cities like London, Singapore and Brussels — aims to demystify the art-buying experience by presenting it as welcoming, fun, and most importantly: economical. BreakThruTV attended the affair and spoke to artists about their work.
As Kodak goes through bankruptcy proceedings, a retrospective on the once commonplace brand name.
Harold Eugene Edgerton, Football Kick, 1938 Today on the show we are going to be talking about sports. My guest, curator David Little, has just put together an exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts called The Sports Show: Athletics As Image and Spectacle. The show charts the cultural significance of sports media from the early days of photography to the present day. It includes work from well known artists like Andy Warhol, Andreas Gursky and Henri Cartier-Bresson, as well as  news photographs, television footage, film and video. This range of media sheds light on the myriad ways that our politics, racial tensions, national identities and cultural values are reflected in sports. The Sports Show also reveals some of the surprising artistic per-cursors to the way we visually experience sports today. For example, the concept behind instant replay, David suggests, was developed back in the 1890s by a photographer named Eadweard Muybridge who made stop-action photographs of bodies in motion. Other visual conventions that we take for granted in modern sports broadcasts — telephoto close ups, on the field shots, aerial views from the Goodyear blimp — were pioneered in photographs and films by artists Alexander Rodchenko and Leni Reifenstahl, Hitler’s infamous propagandist. David recently spoke with me over the phone from Minneapolis about the history of sports images and why he thinks sports have been largely absent from critical discussion in visual art. `Eadweard Muybridge, Animal Locomotion Plate 344, 1887 Paul Pfeiffer, The Saints, 2007 Martin Munkacsi, Spectators at a Sports Event, from the series “Crowd,” 1933 Unknown photographer, Babe Ruth, 1919 Alexander Rodchenko, Horse Race, 1935 Leni Riefenstahl, Jesse Owens, 1936 Roger Welch, O.J. Simpson Project, 1977 Kota Ezawa, Brawl, 2008 Frank Lloyd Wright, Girls Gym Class, 1900 Playlist: 00:00 Thomas Intro 01:49 David Little Interview pt. 1 04:32 Final Day – Young Marble Giants 05:36 David Little Interview pt. 2 10:22 Take a Trip – Utah Smith 13:02 David Little Interview pt. 3 17:27 Telephoto Lens – The Bongos 19:43 David Little Interview pt. 4 23:40 Cheerleader – St. Vincent 25:18 David Little Interview pt. 5 34:16 Bass Drum Dream – The Microphones 34:50 David Little Interview pt. 6 38:02 Wrong Time Capsule – Deerhoof 39:26 David Little Interview pt. 7 42:55 I Don’t Want to Play Football – Belle and Sebastian 43:49 David Little Interview pt. 8 47:07 Evanescent Psychic Pez Drop – Yo La Tengo 47:38 Finish
My guest this week is Antwerp based-photographer Jan Kempenaers. Jan broke out on the photography scene in 2010 when he published a book called Spomenik. The book documents the giant geometric sculptures that were built across the countryside of the former Yugoslavia in the 60s and 70 as monuments to various sites and battles from World War Two. Jan traveled to these isolated sites to photograph these alien-looking sculptures. Before Jan’s project these monuments were largely unknown except to the people in the small towns where they’re located.
Photographer Thilde Jensen’s story starts rather typically. She moved to New York City in 1997 to pursue a career as a photographer, and for while things were going pretty well. She graduated from the School of Visual Arts, fell in love, got married and was getting editorial work with Newsweek and other Magazines. Then, something very strange happened: she started getting sick. “I started to just not feel totally right,” she says. “I would have fevers in the summer… and I would get sore throats, and have constant sinus infections.”

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