Archive
This Week: Photographer Lynn Saville discusses her new book Dark City: Urban America at Night.
 “The Wolves” from Ghost Stepping This Week: Photographer Molly Lamb discusses her work, growing up in the South, and how she uses photography to talk about ideas of home, loss and memory. Molly’s latest exhibition Home and Away opens at Rick Wester Fine Art on September 15th.  “Mumble, Utter, Hum” from Ghost Stepping  “Untitled 9” from Take Care of Your Sister  “Untitled 9” from Let It Go  “Untitled 17” from Take Care of Your Sister
Artist Theresa Ganz talks about making her photo-based collages and her interest in 19th and 21st century visions of the landscape. We also discuss how growing up in the city made her curious about nature, the connection between her work and outer space, and the ways that artists’ depictions of the land reflect issues of gender and power.
Photographer Amy Eckert talks about her collage work and her photography project, Manufacturing Home. For the project Amy photographed the interiors of model mobile homes around the U.S.
Photographer Lisa Elmaleh talks about driving her homemade, portable darkroom through the American Southeast to take photographs of the Florida Everglades and traditional folk musicians in Appalachia.
Landscape architect David Seiter talks about his new project: Spontaneous Urban Plants: Weeds in NYC. David is interested in how weeds might be used by landscape designers and urban planners to improve our cities. David is the design director and founding principle of Future Green Studio.
Denver, Colorado based artist and photographer Edie Winograde talks about her project Sight Seen, which she made while traveling through America’s national parks. Edie is interested in how we experience history in the landscape, and her pictures of places like Niagara Falls, Monument Valley, and Scott’s Bluff showcase the sublime beauty of the landscape as well as the way nature is packaged for tourists and travelers.
Artist Christine Osinski has a new book of photos called Summer Days Staten Island. The project, shot in the early 1980s, documents the working class neighborhoods of Staten Island, where Christine moved after getting priced out of Manhattan. In this episode Osinski speaks about her Staten Island book, her evolution as a photographer, and what images from 30 years in the past have to tell us about our present.
A look into nature’s ability to design the surreal landscape of the Three Parallel Rivers of China.
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, a handful of artists began leaving New York City to make monumental artworks in the landscape of the American Southwest. Frustrated by the commodity driven structures of museums and galleries and eager to explore new forms of sculpture and drawing, artists like Robert Smithson, Walter De Maria, and Michael Heizer picked up bulldozers and shovels and began to make work from the land. Smithson, for example built Spiral Jetty: a spiraling pathway of stone situated in The Great Salt Lake. Walter DeMaria constructed a grid of steel lightening rods called The Lightning Field in a remote section of the New Mexico Desert. A piece called Double Negative by Michael Heizer resembles a monumental excavation, carved from a mesa in Nevada. These pieces, and many others like them, are known as Land art, and they’re the subject of a fascinating new documentary by director James Crump.

recommendations