Archive
indie pop
Blending sparse acoustics and glistening synth, Brooklyn’s Snowmine make indie-rock music that evokes both the aching sentimentality and darling harmonies of Fleet Foxes, and the body moving tribal beats and electronics of Yeasayer. The five-piece — led by new-classical composer Grayson Sanders — knows how to assemble songs that are well-textured and emotional, but it’s their real knack for building upon strong pop melodies that makes their work so appealing.
Originally an electronic duo from Florida, Conveyor has evolved into a Brooklyn-based quartet whose charming indie-pop features sweet harmonies, folk-inspired melodies, and bits of dazzling synth. The band — consisting of Gary Alan Busch, Jr., Michael Ryan Pedron, Evan Michael Garfield, and TJ Masters — play with various textures and moods, poppy and playful one moment, subdued and forlorn the next. Here, the band discuss the recording of their new album and perform a number of new songs.
Originally a duo featuring Holly Laessig and Jess Wolfe, Brooklyn’s Lucius now has four permanent members and performs with a rotating fifth. Their charming indie-pop borrows mostly from country and folk, but their songs vary in mood and style — some are quirky and frenetic (reminiscent of St. Vincent), while others are sparse and delicate (like Feist). Though they sing heartbreaking tales, it’s the powerful, yet tender, harmonies of Laessig and Wolfe that make the music especially poignant.
Berlin-based trio Fenster play charming chamber-pop. Despite eerie stories of graveyards and ghosts, their songs are minimalistic and calming, marked by their sparse, soft-spoken tenderness. The band also has its fair share of sweeping, climactic moments often accentuated by an assortment of sounds like rattling tambourines and emphatic handclaps. Here, they even use our studios’ sprinklers as an instrument.
Blending sparse acoustics and glistening synth, Brooklyn’s Snowmine make indie-rock music that evokes both the aching sentimentality and darling harmonies of Fleet Foxes, and the body moving tribal beats and electronics of Yeasayer. The five-piece — led by new-classical composer Grayson Sanders — knows how to assemble songs that are well-textured and emotional, but it’s their real knack for building upon strong pop melodies that makes their work so appealing.
Shenandoah and the Night is a dreamy indie-pop group from New York City. Led by sultry vocalist Sheah Ableman (formerly of San Francisco’s Yard Dogs Road Show), the band sometimes incorporates Doo-wop and folk into their music, channeling the sounds of Nina Simone, Janis Joplin and The Black Keys. Ableman is an especially captivating frontwoman, full of endless flair and personality. Here, the group performs at the bar Brooklyn Social in Carroll Gardens.
Crinkles do dreamy and lush lo-fi pop, their hazy hooks comparable to those of acts like Real Estate and Youth Lagoon. Originally from Burlington, VT, the five-piece — featuring Jonathan Campolo, Nicholas Campolo, Daniel Crosby, Kyle Kabel, and Andrew Chugg — moved to Brooklyn in 2009. Since then, they’ve amassed a number of tracks, many of which are on their debut full-length entitled Loss Leader. Here, Crinkles premiere some of those new songs.
San Diego five-piece Cuckoo Chaos create intricately layered indie-pop that’s peppered with surf rock and Afropop. Their songs, full of sweet harmonies and jangly guitars, have moments of unpredictable creativity and instant catchiness. Live, the band — made up of Jackson Milgaten, Scott Wheeler, Dave Mead, Jeremy Scott, and Craig Barclift — show not only their energy, but also the technical skill and precision of their music. Here they perform four brand new, previously unreleased songs off their forthcoming album.
Comprised of Greg Walters and Cason Kelly, Tiny Victories experiment with countless sounds and samples to create exhilarating electronic music that combines chillwave and dream-pop. The Brooklyn-based duo make their futuristic pop anthems come to life with waves of noise that throb, buzz, and ripple with real sonic power. Walters’ deep, Joy Division-like vocals also give the songs an added gritty texture.
Indie pop band Summer Camp is made up of Jeremy Warmsley and Elizabeth Sankey. Hailing from England, the duo write dark and conflicted tales of love and longing, while their music is shrouded in nostalgia, sounding as though it’s of another time. The catchy, lo-fi tunes, like “Better Off Without You” and “Brian Krakow,” draw inspiration from playful 60s girl groups and yet simultaneously seem perfect for any 80s movie soundtrack (or an episode of My So-Called Life). Here they perform a special acoustic set for BTR Live Studio.
Brooklyn’s Field Mouse play shimmery shoegaze that’s both graceful and completely addictive. Since their 2010 debut, You Are Here, the band — consisting of singer/guitarist Rachel Browne, guitarist Andrew Frutal, drummer Geoff Lewit and, more recently, new bassist Danielle DePalma — has further refined their pop sensibilities. Featuring lush, pretty arrangements and Browne’s delicate vocals, the songs bloom into dreamy soundscapes and flow smoothly from start to finish.
New York-based Guards is led by long-haired California crooner Richie James Follin (brother of Madeline Follin from Cults). The band — which also includes Loren Ted Humphrey, John Fredericks and Kaylie Church — produces charming, retro lo-fi pop that calls to mind the sweet vocal harmonies and cheery melodies of classic Doo-wop and 60s girl groups. Their songs are chock full of hearty organ chords, dark lyricism, fuzzy reverb and rollicking choruses, and even feature cameos by Chairlift’s Caroline Polachek and MGMT’s James Richardson.
Hailing from Wales, Los Campesinos! play wild indie-pop that’s clever, catchy, and overflowing with fiery, jarring punk-infused moments. Though the seven-piece has gone through a number of personnel changes over the years, the band’s nurtured a tight, sunny-meets-rowdy sound — inspiring everything from joyous head-bobbing to adrenalized raised fists. Underneath the energetic, sweet melodies are tales of heartache. Here that vulnerability especially shows, as they perform stripped-down versions of songs off their latest album, Hello Sadness.
Hailing from Stockholm, Serenades features Shout Out Louds vocalist/guitarist Adam Olenius and Laasko frontman Markus Krunegard. Together the duo create gorgeous synth-pop packed with sugar-coated melodies, impressive harmonies and anthemic choruses. Formed just last year, the Swedish group’s already signed to Cherrytree Records -- an imprint of Interscope, headed by famous Lady Gaga A&R honcho Martin Kierszenbaum -- and has a pleasingly polished, radio-friendly sound.
Originally an electronic duo from Florida, Conveyor has evolved into a Brooklyn-based quartet whose ambient, experimental indie-pop is marked by warm, folk-inspired melodies that glimmer with bits of dazzling synth. The band — consisting of Gary Alan Busch, Jr., Michael Ryan Pedron, Evan Michael Garfield, and Timothy John Masters — experiments with different textures and moods, sounding like a hybrid of Iron & Wine crossed with Caribou. On this episode of BTR Hear & There, Conveyor perform a poignant new song from their forthcoming EP inside of a glowing Williamsburg loft.

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