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Radical Dads are the Gowanus, Brooklyn-based trio of Lindsay Baker, Chris Diken, and Robbie Guertin (formerly of Clap Your Hands Say Yeah). In addition to pumping out great pop jams accompanied by only the most excellent artwork, the band professes their appreciation for "gummy snacks, hitting the fizz, snoozin’ on Sundays, meditation, meditating on pizza, pizza itself, sunglasses, friends, all-time peace, and the search for the attainment of the transcendence of coolness." We can get behind that. Oh, and the music rules, too.
Katie Mullins is a Brooklyn-based singer/songwriter with a background as an opera singer and actress. Not your typical “girl with guitar,” she’s known for utilizing the mbira, a thumb-piano in the Zimbabwean tuning that she made herself, as well as a baritone ukulele and looping pedals to sculpt lush soundscapes to deliver her hauntingly beautiful songs. The recent addition of a keyboard to her arsenal has opened up new creative worlds for Katie, who spent a summer afternoon with BTRtv, hanging out in a rooftop pool in Gowanus, Brooklyn, using her new instrument to play the song "Boats And Buoys."
Radical Dads are the Gowanus, Brooklyn-based trio of Lindsay Baker, Chris Diken, and Robbie Guertin (formerly of Clap Your Hands Say Yeah). In addition to pumping out great pop jams accompanied by only the most excellent artwork, the band professes their appreciation for "gummy snacks, hitting the fizz, snoozin’ on Sundays, meditation, meditating on pizza, pizza itself, sunglasses, friends, all-time peace, and the search for the attainment of the transcendence of coolness." We can get behind that. Oh, and the music rules, too.
Opened in May 2011 in Jersey City, Mana Contemporary is a multi-dimensional art complex that provides services and space for artists, art patrons, collectors, and the local community. BreakThruTV’s Lauren Hawker attended the exclusive first look at one of their new shows, Ray Smith: Here | Now. The New York and New Jersey area is still recovering from Hurricane Sandy. Among those affected was Ray Smith, a Mexican-American artist whose Brooklyn studio suffered major flooding. Mana offered Smith refuge by offering studio space and an exhibition to showcase his waterlogged work.