Archive
In Part II, Adam Johnson talks about the media's tendency to frame the United States in a benevolent light and the cultish ideology surrounding American war.
Anna Lekas Miller joins us to discuss her reporting on families living in Mosul in the aftermath of ISIS. Also, catching up on listener mail.
It’s MGG Thursdays and Melissa Gira Grant is here to talk news consumption, distraction, and reliability. Also, John checks in on the attack in Iran. Photo credit: Twitter (@melissagira)
Benjamin Friedman returns to discuss domestic tumult's effect on foreign policy, how the U.S. can afford to start wars in the Middle East, and why the current administration shouldn't be trusted with wars.
Benjamin Friedman joins the show to discuss what President Trump's unpredictability means for our allies and adversaries, the lack of strategy in Syria, and why the president has become more of a traditional hawk.
Darren Samuelsohn is back to discuss Donald Trump's dogged commitment to campaign promises and the conflicts of interest created by the president's businesses.
Joe discusses the current unpredictability of American foreign relations, as well as Donald Trump's interview with Reuters, where the president admitted he thought the job "would be easier."
John is in the studio to catch up on the waking nightmare we live in now, the NYT messes up an op-ed on gender, and listener mail. Photo credit: Wikipedia commons
In the second part of our conversation, Dr. Steve Billet discusses the troublesome nature of President Trump's unpredictability with foreign affairs, his shift toward mainstream Republican foreign policy, and the media's curious reverence for military intervention.
A white supremacist has been charged with murder as an act of terrorism after killing a black man in New York City, John checks in on the US bombing in Iraq that killed hundreds of civilians, and listener mail. Photo credit: Wikipedia Commons
Benjamin Friedman discusses the oddity of Donald Trump's connections to Russia and whether they're cause for concern, as well as what decades-old defense deals might look like during and after a Trump presidency.
Benjamin Friedman discusses why it's so hard to predict an incoming president's foreign policy and why he believes Donald Trump will be "conventionally hawkish."