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Blending sparse acoustics and glistening synth, Brooklyn’s Snowmine make indie-rock music that evokes both the aching sentimentality and darling harmonies of Fleet Foxes, and the body moving tribal beats and electronics of Yeasayer. The five-piece — led by new-classical composer Grayson Sanders — knows how to assemble songs that are well-textured and emotional, but it’s their real knack for building upon strong pop melodies that makes their work so appealing.
The folk-pop tinged music of Brooklyn singer-songwriter Kelli Scarr is pure and poignant, smooth and seductive, reminiscent at times of Neil Young or Gillian Welch. Scarr — who has toured and worked with Moby and been nominated for an Emmy for her soundtrack work on HBO’s In a Dream — wears her heart on her sleeve lyrically, and her cool and soothing vocals are especially soul-stirring.
Jesse Marchant, or JBM as he’s more commonly known in the music world, creates delicate, subdued and moving indie rock. Written mostly on an acoustic guitar, his songs are sparse, though never simplistic — he’s classically trained on the guitar and quick with his fingers — and overall the music often conveys a haunting, yet beautiful emotional quality. He’s shared the stage with well-known acts like St. Vincent and The Tallest Man On Earth.
This Is The Kit is the project of English-born singer-songwriter Kate Sables. Based out of Paris and often accompanied by longtime collaborator Jesse Vernon, she plays folk-rock that is sparse, stripped-down, and marked by a captivatingly tender and calm ambiance. Sables has been lauded by artists like Sharon Van Etten, and she is currently signed to Brassland Records, the label co-founded by The National’s Aaron and Bryce Dessner.
Originally a duo featuring Holly Laessig and Jess Wolfe, Brooklyn’s Lucius now has four permanent members and performs with a rotating fifth. Their charming indie-pop borrows mostly from country and folk, but their songs vary in mood and style — some are quirky and frenetic (reminiscent of St. Vincent), while others are sparse and delicate (like Feist). Though they sing heartbreaking tales, it’s the powerful, yet tender, harmonies of Laessig and Wolfe that make the music especially poignant.
Bird Courage is a folk-rock duo who perform their moving, mellow folk-rock in subway stations all over New York City. The pair — made up of New Zealand artist Samuel Saffery and Bushwick musician Erik Meier — teamed up after originally competing for busking spots. Together they create acoustic music that’s full of raw emotion, especially with the group’s fragile, almost hushed, vocals.
Here we present an extra video from our BTR Live Studio session with You Won’t, featuring a performance of their song, “Three Car Garage.”
Originally from Cambridge, Mass., You Won’t mix lo-fi rock and stripped-down folk. Beneath the layers of raw distortion, their songs are strewn with sincere lyrics and endearing twangy-pop melodies. The band — made up of Josh Arnoudse, Raky Sastri, Tony Leva — released their debut full-length, Skeptic Goodbye, earlier this year.
Blending sparse acoustics and glistening synth, Brooklyn’s Snowmine make indie-rock music that evokes both the aching sentimentality and darling harmonies of Fleet Foxes, and the body moving tribal beats and electronics of Yeasayer. The five-piece — led by new-classical composer Grayson Sanders — knows how to assemble songs that are well-textured and emotional, but it’s their real knack for building upon strong pop melodies that makes their work so appealing.
Shenandoah and the Night is a dreamy indie-pop group from New York City. Led by sultry vocalist Sheah Ableman (formerly of San Francisco’s Yard Dogs Road Show), the band sometimes incorporates Doo-wop and folk into their music, channeling the sounds of Nina Simone, Janis Joplin and The Black Keys. Ableman is an especially captivating frontwoman, full of endless flair and personality. Here, the group performs at the bar Brooklyn Social in Carroll Gardens.
Hailing from Sheffield, UK, Slow Club — a music duo consisting of Charles Watson and Rebecca Taylor — play charming, sentimental folk-pop. Their mix of melancholy lyricism and toe-tap worthy melodies call to mind an English version of Mates of State. Taylor’s graceful vocals sound especially delicate and airy, as though they drift seamlessly over the synth-tinged songs. Here they perform as a four-piece.
Low Roar is Ryan Karazija, former singer of West Coast band Audrye Sessions. Originally from San Francisco, he moved to Reykjavik, Iceland, and recorded his first full-length under the new moniker. The album’s beautiful and ambient indie-folk has a haunting chilliness that seems borrowed from the frigid, isolated surroundings, while Karazija’s voice, eerily similar to Thom Yorke’s, is yearning and vulnerable. The songs are simple — adorned only with bells, accordions and occasional electronic bits — yet filled with emotional depth.