Archive
In March, world renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs joined the show to discuss his new book, the importance of sustainable development, and his faith in younger generations.
Jamison Issak creates soothing sounds for a world in pain on ‘Themes For Dying Earth.’
Torah Talk with Matt Ruby & Charles Gould. Jacqueline Soller and Charles Hinshaw on ‘Blade Runner 2049.’ Molly Knefel on Trump’s attack on birth control mandates. Sloppy Heads’ BTR Live Studio session.
John is in the studio to discuss Ta-Nehisi Coates’ essay “The First White President.” Also, what’s going on with Trump and Pelosi and Schumer, and listener mail.    Ta-Nehisi Coates photo by Eduardo Montes-Bradley courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
It’s MGG Thursdays and Melissa Gira Grant is here to talk DACA, climate refugees, and finding the weaknesses in the system. Melissa Gira Grant, via Twitter
William Cheung joins the show to discuss his recent study exploring how climate change could shrink multiple species of fish by 20 to 30 percent.
Caroline Nagy joins us to discuss flood insurance policy, and John is in the studio to talk about Molly’s essay on how we talk about Nazis and bullies.      Photo by Bill Koplitz courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Resa Blatman is an interdisciplinary Massachusetts-based artist whose work considers issues of climate change and its effect on our landscape and natural resources. She stated that her work “inhabits the terrain between the poetry of art and nature, and the future of climate dystopia.” Resa received her MFA from Boston University in 2006 and her BFA from Massachusetts College of Art and Design in 1995. She has had solo exhibitions at the Wright Art Center Gallery at the Delta State University in Mississippi, the Museum of Arts and Sciences in Georgia and the Hollister Gallery at Babson College in Massachusetts. And she has also participated in group shows at Spartanburg Art Museum in South Carolina, Chen Art Gallery at Central Connecticut State University and Gauntlet Gallery in San Fransisco. And she has upcoming shows at the Dorsky Gallery in Long Island City, the University of New Hampshire Museum of Art and the University Gallery at Western Illinois University. She was an artist in resident at the Vermont Studio Center and the Arctic Circle Residency in Svalbard Norway. All images courtesy of the artist Bleached Coral 1, 2017. Arylic, colored pencil and pen on board. 20 in x 30 in Bleached Coral 3, 2017. Arylic, colored pencil and pen on board. 15 in x 20 in Fading Reef, 2017. Acrylic, colored pencil, and pen on Mylar. 96 in x 101.25 in Dispersant, 2017. Oil on hand-cut Mylar. 112 in x 96 in x 8in Dispersant, 2017. Oil on hand-cut Mylar. 112 in x 96 in x 8in Tempest (detail), 2013. Oil and glitter on layered, laser-cut panels. 42 in x 100 in x 3 in The Fall, 2012. Oil, beads, glitter, glue, and graphite on DiBond aluminum panels. 72 in x 156 in
Ryan Schleeter joins us to discuss climate justice and Hurricane Harvey. Also, listeners weigh in on our discussion about how adults talk about kids. Photo by Planet A. courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Molly is back from her week away, Morning John on Arpaio and Gorka, Hurricane Harvey devastates southern Texas, huge counter protests push back Nazi rallies in San Francisco and Berkeley, and listener mail. Joe Arpaio photo by Gage Skidmore courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
By making something untouchable, you’re conveying your political beliefs on the matter. It limits the parameters of political discussion while willfully ignoring the larger implications of a global issue.
Jaanika Peerna is an Estonian-born artist living and working primarily in New York since 1998 as well as in Berlin and Tallinn. Her work encompasses drawing, video, installation and performance, often dealing with the theme of transitions in light, air, water and other natural phenomena. She is often involved in collaborative projects working with dancers and musicians. She has exhibited her work extensively in the entire New York metropolitan area as well as in Berlin, Paris, Tallinn, Helsinki, Venice, Moscow, Dubai, Sydney, and Cologne. Her work is in numerous private collections in the US and Europe and has been acquired by French National Art collection in Paris. Her work is represented in the United States by ARC Fine Art in Connecticut, and Galerie Ulf Larsson in Cologne. She is a member artist at Artist Pension Trust and was awarded the FID Grand Prize in 2016 for her work in drawing. All images courtesy of the artist  
John is in the studio to talk how climate change is already impacting the United States, de Blasio proposes a millionaires tax to fund the MTA, and a check in on the left conflict around Kamala Harris. Copenhagen Climate Summit Photo by Marc Kjerland courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Adrian Raftery joins the show to discuss his recent study that project the planet has little chance of meeting the goals set forth in the Kyoto Protocol or Paris Climate Agreement.
Daniel Lanzilotta is an environmental artist who repurposes plastic waste, detritus, rubbish, fragments of litter, trash, flotsam and jetsam into works of art. Daniel is also a private chef who advocates for naturally grown foods. He received his BFA from Carnegie Mellon in 1984 and has been interviewed across the media, including by networks such as Channel 12 News, Fox 61 and the Norwalk Daily Voice. He has recently had exhibitions at spaces such as  Green County Art Council in the Catskills, Creativity Caravan in Montclair NJ, Scrap Gallery in Cathedral City. And he currently has work up at Compass Realty in Brooklyn and the Westport Library. All images courtesy of the artist
It’s JAMJAM Fridays and Jesse Myerson is here to talk climate change and having children, male birth control, and updates on the AHCA. Jesse Myerson, via Twitter
This week, we welcome back contributors Ester Steinberg and Matt Ruby to discuss the ongoing issue of so-called “Fake News”. Also, Charles Hinshaw returns to discuss the new movie, Wonder Woman,…
Molly Knefel — one half of the sibling host team of the longrunning progressive politics podcast, Radio Dispatch — offers her take on the recently formed United States Climate Alliance. This alliance, formed by U.S. political figures, is a response to President Trump’s official withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord and promises to uphold the goals set in 2015 which aim to reduce carbon emissions and invest in renewable energy. Music featured in the episode: “Untitled” by Tiny Victories
John’s in the studio to talk about the broader implications of Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, plus red-baiting in Brooklyn schools, and listener mail. People’s Climate March 2017 Photo by Dcpeopleandeventsof2017 courtesy of Wikimedia Commons  
After pulling out of the Paris Climate Agreement, Trump is very pleased with himself. No one else is.
John Cook returns to discuss the impact of the United States’ withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement.
It’s JAMJAM Friday and Jesse Myerson is here to talk about Portland, white people standing up for people of color, and the upcoming the British election. Also, Morning John on the Paris climate accord.
Reuben Safire is back to discuss the South Korea elections as well as living with a chronic illness under Trump, and Laura Eyring is here to discuss the intersections of veganism and climate change.       Photo credit: Twitter (@RSafire)
John Cook joins the show to discuss his recent study regarding misinformation about climate change, the trouble with giving equal weight to contrarian views, and the importance of educating about misleading argumentation.
Peter Frase joins us to discuss his book Four Futures: Life After Capitalism, and listener mail. Photo credit: Twitter (@pefrase)
Jan Null joins the show to discuss El Niño, common misconceptions about the weather phenomenon, and how it’s one of many factors in global warming and cooling.
Jonathon Keats was stated as being a “poet of ideas” by The New Yorker and a “multimedia philosopher-prophet” by The Atlantic. Jonathon Keats is an artist, writer and experimental philosopher based in San Francisco and Northern Italy. His conceptually-driven interdisciplinary projects explore all aspects of society through science and technology. He has installed a camera with a thousand-year-long exposure – documenting the long-term effects of climate change – at Arizona State University; opened a photosynthetic restaurant serving gourmet sunlight to plants at the Crocker Art Museum;  and attempted to genetically engineer God in collaboration with scientists at the UC Berkeley. Exhibited internationally, Keats’s projects have been documented by PBS, Reuters, and the BBC World Service, garnering favorable attention in periodicals ranging from Science to Flash Art to The Economist. In recent years, he has lectured at institutions including UC Berkeley, Stanford University and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), which recently awarded him a 2015-16 Art + Technology Lab Grant. All photos courtesy of Jonathon Keats. Birds use Earth’s magnetic field to guide their flight path. However geomagnetism is relatively weak, and easily overridden by other sources of magnetism at close proximity. Research has shown that magnets can affect birds’ internal compasses. In this experimental prototype, a magnet has been attached to a toy airplane, influencing the compass needles beneath it, providing an alternate north-south orientation for birds to follow. Large cities on migratory flyways may imperil birds. Light and electromagnetic pollution can be disorienting, and urbanization may deprives them of habitat for roosting. By electromagnetically manipulating compass directions, air traffic control towers can steer birds around cities or even entire regions. This satellite map of the United States at night reveals where urbanization is most pronounced by showing where artificial light is most concentrated. The superimposed compasses show potential alterations to the geomagnetic field that will reorient flyways around human developments. Base Map Courtesy of NASA Earth Observatory Micro-vibrators titillate flowers that have to be artificially pollinated as colony collapse disorder afflicts honeybee populations. These botanical sex toys can be battery- or solar powered. This model shows several sex toys attached to a plant. A dismantled micro-vibrator is also displayed. Micro-vibrators titillate flowers that have to be artificially pollinated as colony collapse disorder afflicts honeybee populations. These botanical sex toys can be battery- or solar powered. This model shows several sex toys attached to a plant. A dismantled micro-vibrator is also displayed. Fiber optics facilitate photosynthesis in corals, providing an alternate energy source when turbid or polluted oceans prevent adequate sunlight from passing through the water. This conceptual model shows how the fiber optics cables might be illuminated by LEDs that are powered by photovoltaics on the ocean surface. The LEDs could alternately be powered by wave energy, or the fiber optics could be illuminated directly with a solar concentrator. Military camouflage designed for urban combat allows reptiles to elude detection in cities as urbanization overtakes their natural habitats. In this model, a turtle wears a camouflage fabric shell covering.    
During the second half of our conversation, Jeffrey Sachs discusses his recent opinion piece for the Boston Globe, concerns surrounding Donald Trump, and his faith in millennials.
Renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs joins the show to discuss sustainable development, the current division in our politics, and the problem with our country’s lack of forward planning.
Researchers are mapping the disappearance of bees in America, and it ain’t pretty.
Extinction isn’t just for dinosaurs anymore–according to scientists, the Earth is undergoing its sixth mass extinction, which could spell trouble for the planet.
Welcome back to Third Eye Weekly. On this podcast we try and answer the big questions with intimate, personal narratives that give insight into the human experience that others might over-look. For today’s podcast we’re joined by professor, paleontologist, and author Anthony D. Barnosky. He’s the executive director for the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve and the author of several books, including “Dodging Extinction: Power, Food, Money, and the Future of Life on Earth,” as well as 2016’s Tipping Point for Planet Earth: How Close Are We to the Edge?” He’s here today to speak with us about the earth’s sixth mass extinction in its history. Music & Poetry Tycho
Antonia Juhasz on Tillerson and Exxon, DOJ looks at Comey, and listener mail

recommendations