Archive
Rebecca Arkin is an attorney in Manhattan. She’s grounded, driven, and successful. When a legal battle breaks out for control of the company, it falls to Rebecca to keep her family from collapsing, all while trying desperately to extricate herself from their grasp. Unfortunately, she’s also the granddaughter of Ben Arkin, an artist who has never sold a piece, and the daughter of Oliver Arkin, who — along with his sisters — runs a record company that has never had a hit.
This week BTR speaks with Howie Good about his recent collection of poems “A Ghost Sings, A door Opens,” which was published by Another Calligraphy Press. Good is a poet and professor of journalism at SUNY New Paltz, and the author of numerous poetry collections and scholarly books, including: “Dangerous Acts Starring Unstable Elements,” “Girl Reporter” and “Journalism Ethics Goes to the Movies”.
This Week: Photographer Lynn Saville discusses her new book Dark City: Urban America at Night.
This week, in honor of the start of football season, a conversation with with Michael Oriard. Michael is a writer, cultural historian of football, and former offensive lineman for the Kansas City Chiefs.
Landscape architect David Seiter talks about his new project: Spontaneous Urban Plants: Weeds in NYC. David is interested in how weeds might be used by landscape designers and urban planners to improve our cities. David is the design director and founding principle of Future Green Studio.
Artist, writer, and self-described experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats talks about his new book, “You Belong to the Universe: Buckminster Fuller and the Future.” In the book Jonathon examines some of Fuller’s most well known inventions, like the Dymaxion Car, as well as some obscure ones, like Two-Way TV, to explore how Bucky’s ideas and approach to the world might be put to use in the 21st century.
In his new photo book, “War is Beautiful,” writer David Shields argues that the New York Times’ front page photographs of our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have failed to depict the true horror and destruction of war, instead opting for sanitized pictures that emphasize heroic subjects and beautiful painterly compositions.
Geoff Manaugh talks about his new book A Burglar’s Guide to the City. The book poses the question: How do we see a building or the city differently if we view it through the eyes of someone trying to to rob it? Throughout A Burglar’s Guide we hear about heists and getaways, architects turned bank robbers, and learn why the film Die Hard is “one of the best architectural films of the past three decades.” In addition to A Burglar’s Guide Geoff also writes the fantastic BLDGBLOG, a blog about architecture and the built environment.
Artist Christine Osinski has a new book of photos called Summer Days Staten Island. The project, shot in the early 1980s, documents the working class neighborhoods of Staten Island, where Christine moved after getting priced out of Manhattan. In this episode Osinski speaks about her Staten Island book, her evolution as a photographer, and what images from 30 years in the past have to tell us about our present.
We Need Diverse Books is a campaign that aims to bring equality and diversity to the publishing industry, highlighting an oft-ignored flaw in the way we share stories.
Jonathon Keats is an artist and experimental philosopher. In his book, Forged, he makes the case for why forgers are the greatest artists of our age. In his book, he looks at the history of art forgery, and tells the stories of six incredible and ambitious forgers who conned art experts, Nazi officials and entire nations into believing in their fake wares. Jonathon argues that a well perpetrated forgery forces all of us to to question our ideas about authenticity, authority and belief. This is something that most legitimate artwork fails to achieve.
In her book, Studio Life, writer and photographer Sarah Trigg documents the studio practices of artists across America, highlighting the spaces, objects, and rituals that inform the artistic process.

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