Poison Abbey Pays Homage to ‘James Bond’ & ‘Young Frankenstein’

She creates indie dance beats and colorful melodies designed to help you forget your worries, get down and groove.

Jess Rogleff aka Poison Abbey dons stylish daisy shades and drapes herself in metallic colors. She sings about empowerment and independence to beats similar to something you would’ve heard in Studio 54. The Australian musician says she just wants people to feel “light” when they hear her music.

“I hope people enjoy Poison Abbey and can listen to it both alone or at a party,” she tells BTRtoday. “I don’t want anyone to feel anything other than enjoyment, really.”

Rogleff got her chance to really express her love for ‘70s Hollywood by paying homage to ‘70s-era James Bond movies in her most recent music video for “Silicon Valet.” The video features her in gold paint and silk robes surrounded by extravagant and lavish home decor.

“[It’s] especially [James Bond-esque] with the set and the general mood of indulgence and excess,” Rogleff says about the music video. “That isn’t really what my life is like at all, so it was really funny to shoot.”

Watch the music video for “Silicon Valet” and read the entire interview with Poison Abbey below.

Poison Abbey, “Silicon Valet”

BTRtoday (BTR): Why call yourself Poison Abbey? What do you want people to imagine when they hear that name?

Jess Rogleff (JR): Well, the project was initially named “Abbey Normal,” which is a reference from the movie Young Frankenstein, but after realising that we shared the name with a popular Youtube psychic, the name got booted. But, an abbey is a complex of buildings used by members of a religious order and I thought that was great imagery.

BTR: Did you always listen to this kind of pop-funk style of music? What was your first musical obsession?

JR: Pop-funk and electronic funk music have always been something I’ve taken an interest in because people have been making it for ages. One of my first musical obsessions was the sounds of the French touch movement of the late ‘90s and early 2000s—super heavy and distorted kicks and snares and compressed pads and a lot of sampling from old ‘70s and ‘80s records. It sounds super crisp and doesn’t really have any agenda other than making people feel really light.

BTR:Tell me about your album Silicon Valet that just came out—what kind of emotions went into this album?

JR: The song is about finding empowerment through independence. Most of the lyrics on the record follow this central theme. I wrote them while I was living alone in the bush for a year and had a lot of time to think about a recent break-up that was particularly traumatic.

BTR: What’s your ideal reaction from your listeners?

JR: I hope people enjoy Poison Abbey and can listen to it both alone or at a party. I don’t want anyone to feel anything other than enjoyment, really. The idea was to make super saccharine pop music that is kind of a bit spacey and left-field.

BTR: What ideal situation would you be stoked to walk into and happen to hear your music playing

JR: Well, when I heard it on the radio without expecting to that was pretty good. Maybe in a Christopher Kane runway show.

BTR:Love all the style that pops in your material musically and visually—what inspires your vibe?

JR: The gold paint in the “Still Valet” video was paying homage to [James Bond] 007, especially with the set and the general mood of indulgence and excess. That isn’t really what my life is like at all, so it was really funny to shoot. I really like a lot of the campaigns Gucci is doing at the moment, especially the one scored by Dev Hynes

BTR: What should we keep an eye out for in the future of Poison Abbey?

JR: Poison Abbey’s debut LP will be out later this year, which will be something that people hopefully really like. Next year, I’m hoping to put out an R&B/slow-pop mixtape, but it’s not done yet. In the mean-time there will be a lot of shows around Sydney you can catch.

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