BreakThru News, Ep. 43: New Year’s Resolutions

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTORS Charlotte Thun-Hohenstein

By Charlotte Thun-Hohenstein

Do any of these sound familiar: lose weight, volunteer, quit smoking, or manage stress? Perhaps the most curious thing about New Year’s resolutions is how little they change year to year. The United States government compiled a list of 13 of the most popular ones, complete with online resources for anyone attempting them. They are all customary ways to improve life, and all the more recognizable because we seem to encounter the same ones every year, which after a while might raise some questions about the point of the whole practice.

Maybe that’s why the majority of people don’t actually make New Year’s resolutions. If the yearly ritual were indicative of our discipline at large the result would be pretty damning; one study shows that only eight percent of people actually achieve their New Year’s goals. The difference between success and failure apparently boils down to four pointers: keep the objectives simple, tangible, obvious, and stay positive. A complete life-makeover is setting yourself up for disappointment. Going by these objectives, the government’s list is strong on simplicity, but any of the categories would need to be made more specific for the hopeful actor.

This week BreakThru News chatted with Dane Feldman and Molly Freeman of BTR’s The Hash. It turns out no-one in the room makes serious resolutions, though Dane has an alternative suggestion: New Year’s reflections. Taking stock of the year gone by is presumably a necessary part of any thoughtful agenda for future self-improvement. On a more serious level, the emphasis on contemplation before action would be a practical approach in and of itself. But on a lighter note, rather than drawing up to-do lists for the months ahead (which one could do at any point in the year), why not curl up next to a fireplace and reminisce?

Video Credits
Host, Writer – Charlotte Thun-Hohenstein
Video Editor – Andy Morell

with guests – Dane Feldman, Molly Freeman

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