Episode 11 / Pretty Purgatory

Premiere DateJan 13, 2017
Categories Indie Music Rock
00:00 // SubInev on BTR
01:30 “Pyramids” Burning Palms
03:32 “I Don’t Think She Cares” White Reaper
05:29 “As I Saw Her Off” Johnny V. Lewis
09:10 “Summer Shades” Carnivores
11:14 “Start All Over” Dott
14:38 // SubInev on BTR
15:41 “Naked” Monogold
19:34 “Blood Bath” Kino Kimino
22:46 “Woman” Timber Timbre
26:30 “Hey Hey” High Waisted
29:33 “Big Hands” Flowerss
33:12 “Flight” Son Lux
36:25 “Body Of Work” The Mynabirds
39:22 // SubInev on BTR
40:35 “Life Without Skin” Lumerians
46:27 “Head banging In The Mirror” Ducktails
49:53 “Snowed In” Pronoun
54:16 “Savage Victory” Thee Oh Sees
58:13 // SubInev on BTR / Pretty Purgatory feature
60:58 ”St. Thomas" The Milkman's Union
65:00 ”Salvation" Jacob Augustine
68:42 ”New Home" Ada
75:46 ”Citizens Vain" Yairms
78:53 “Guilty” Snaex
83:40 // SubInev on BTR / Pretty Purgatory feature
87:23 ”The Light Will" Lisa/Liza
90:59 ”Visions from the Holy Cross Cemetary" Afraid
95:38 ”The Golden Room" Afraid
98:26 ”Cloudbedded" Jared Fairfield
101:30 // SubInev on BTR / Pretty Purgatory feature
104:10 ”Peeping Tom" Wei Zhongle
107:17 “Glory, Glory” Bad Braids
113:37 “Maple Syrup” Family Panning
115:59 ”Razor Blade" Snaex
120:06 // SubInev on BTR
121:46 “Waiting For Saints To Arrive” Company
123:57 // SubInev on BTR / outro
124:04 // FINISH

This week on the Sub-Inev show, we take a trip up to Portland, Maine to check out the label/collective, Pretty Purgatory.  Below is some info on the label courtesy of its founder, Peter McLaughlin.

When and how did the label start, and who exactly is involved directly in operating it?
Pretty Purgatory was born in 2014. It had existed in my brain for several years at that point, but it took getting laid off of a job I hated to get me to take the time and actualize this dream in some way. It grew out of a tight-knit pseudo-collective of Maine bands and visual artists that shared projects, band members, bills, houses, studios, and perhaps a certain sort of aesthetic, as well. At a certain point, it made sense to formalize that relationship and put some of work together under a banner. It was a pretty natural thing. It’s always been something of a one-person operation though. It had a bit of a ‘not-another-artist-collective’ ethos from the beginning. Collectives are beautiful things, but often do not have longevity, for good reason. Collective governance is hard stuff. I do the curating of Pretty Purgatory. It’s really my baby. Ultimately, I’m the boss, albeit a highly benevolent one. That said, every project is a collaboration, and I’ve had immense help along the way from the bands themselves, many artists, designers, photographers, engineers, and lots of friends, volunteers, assistants and well-wishers of all types.

Are there any labels that served as inspiration for how you’ve chosen to do things with PP?
I’m not sure there’s been any model for me. I’ve figured things out as I’ve gone (or not figured things out). The music industry’s figuring itself out as it goes these days. The models are all mostly dead anyhow… I’ve certainly been hugely inspired by many labels that I’d love to someday be able to legitimately call peers: NNA, Skirl Records, OSR Tapes, Don’t Trust The Ruin, Exploding in Sound, Feeding Tube, and so many others. Models may be dead, but there’s no shortage of incredible DIY labels in 2017.
What’s coming up for PP in 2017?There’s a new Snaex record produced by Caleb Mulkerin (Larkin Grimm, Big Blood, Swans) coming out in March. I normally don’t tend to put out follow-up releases by bands so quickly, as I just can only handle putting out so many things a year. But I took one listen and I decided I had to release it two songs in. Last year’s In the Heart of the City was a total career record for Chris (Teret) & Chriss (Sutherland), musicians, who’ve been making incredible records for incredible labels for years and years (Chris with Company/Jagjaguwar and Chriss with Cerberus Shoal & Fire on Fire/Temporary Residence Ltd & Young God). This one’s a step further. It just sounds like breathing. These guys have reached old master status, writing the best songs of their life and capturing them effortless.

The debut record from Woodpainting is due out sometime in the first half of the year. It’s a half-NYC/half-Maine-based ensemble that includes singer/guitarist/composer Akiva Zamcheck (DTROTBOT/Spritzer/The Milkman’s Union), videographer Stephanie Gould, singer Jerusha Robinson (South China/Plains/Brown Bird), bassist Nate Allen (Friend Roulette), and myself on drums. Its got a chamber-folk vibe steeped in melodrama. Deeply song-based, but lots of narrative. The album’s a sort of unpretentious operetta. Yes, I do realize ‘unpretentious operetta’ could be an oxymoron. It’s fun though. The chamber music geeks will think we’re a rock band, and the rockers definitely won’t think we’re one of them. We’re probably not. It was recorded by Julian & Carlos from Ava Luna at the Silent Barn, mixed by Paul Hogan in Brooklyn, and then mastered on a reel-to-reel in South Portland by the aforementioned genius Caleb Mulkerin.

There are several other records that I’m incredibly excited about… I have a feeling 2017 will be the busiest & best year yet for the label.


Anything else about the label or yourself you’d like to share?
Labels (at their best) help bands make music and help deliver music to ears, where it belongs. Bands are usually good at the making part, but often not the delivery part, and all the other steps between their guitars and your ears. So, if you like music, you should support labels. Some things are antiquated and obsolete in 2017. Labels are not. Very, very, very few people are making any discernible money in this game. So if the labels in your scene are likely in it for the right reasons. There aren’t really any other reasons left. Support labels. Support magic in your communities. Simple as that. Soapboxing over.

Bryan has been blogging about, photographing, and making music for the better part of two decades. As a Senior Video Producer on the BTRtv video team, he works closely with artists, labels, and the music industry…

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