Archive
Kory French
Book Talk Host DJ Kory takes a look at some of the traditional books and poems read by Western and Christian households at Christmas.
Unsportsmanlike Conduct: College Football and the Politics of Rape is about a different kind of football playbook. Over the last three years, this has been a hot topic as people are wondering aloud and often about the problem of sexual assault on college campuses, especially when it involves the football players on people’s favorite teams. This book explores that playbook, the one coaches, teams, universities, police, communities, the media, and fans seem to follow whenever a college football player is accused, charged, and/or convicted of sexual assault. It’s a deep dive into how different institutions — the NCAA, athletic departments, universities, the media - run the same plays over and over again when these stories break. If everyone runs their plays well, scrutiny dies down quickly, no institution ever has to change how it operates, and the evaporation of these cases into nothingness looks natural.
With more than three million foreign-born residents today, New York has been America’s defining port of entry for nearly four centuries, a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. These migrants have brought their hundreds of languages and distinct cultures to the city, and from there to the entire country. More immigrants have come to New York than all other entry points combined. City of Dreams is peopled with memorable characters both beloved and unfamiliar, whose lives unfold in rich detail.
Chef Rossi grew up “orthodox light” (her family kept the meat and dairy dishes separate but ate McDonalds’ fish sandwiches). A rebellious daughter, she was shipped off from her Hungarian Yiddish family to live with a chasidic rabbi in Brooklyn. Feeling restless, Rossi broke free from religious and familial constraints to create a life of her own. What began as a revolt against the microwave turned into a quest to make food that is fearless, fun and, most importantly, delicious. The book features anecdotes from a life of food plus recipes- ranging from pizza bagels to tuna tartare - to close each section. This tasty memoir shows us how Chef Rossi found a way to pay tribute to her roots while staying true to herself.
Rebecca Arkin is an attorney in Manhattan. She's grounded, driven, and successful. When a legal battle breaks out for control of the company, it falls to Rebecca to keep her family from collapsing, all while trying desperately to extricate herself from their grasp. Unfortunately, she’s also the granddaughter of Ben Arkin, an artist who has never sold a piece, and the daughter of Oliver Arkin, who — along with his sisters — runs a record company that has never had a hit.
When a robbery hits police headquarters, it’s up to Frank Runtime and his extensive search skills to catch the culprits. In this detective story, you’ll learn how to use algorithmic tools to solve the case. Runtime scours smugglers’ boats with binary search, tails spies with a search tree, escapes a prison with depth-first search, and picks locks with priority queues. Joined by know-it-all rookie Officer Notation and inept tag-along Socks, he follows a series of leads in a best-first search that unravels a deep conspiracy. Each chapter introduces a thrilling twist matched with a new algorithmic concept, ending with a technical recap.
In this book, Michael D. Smith and Rahul Telang, experts on entertainment analytics, show how companies like Amazon and Apple are changing the rules in other entertainment industries, notably publishing and music.
An in-depth look into Bob Dylan’s relationship with literature and the written word over the years in celebration of his recent achievement: The Nobel Prize in Literature.
As nationwide concern grows for returning combat soldiers suffering PTSD, Silas Dent Zobal’s literary thriller, The People of the Broken Neck (Unbridled Books, October 2016), serves as a harrowing testament of the times.
Elizabeth George, “superstar of the crime fiction world” (Seattle Times) and author of the beloved Inspector Lynley series, collects the best mystery writing of the year that “will have you on the edge of your seat” (USA Today).  
A leading psychologist reveals how our most underappreciated emotion—pride—has shaped our minds and our culture, and shows how we can harness its immense power in our everyday lives.
Three college friends from the 50s blaze their own path in love and work, braving the stifling conventions of the age, and anticipating the social thaw that would arrive ten years later.
A hilarious debut novel about a wealthy but fractured Chinese immigrant family that had it all, only to lose every last cent – and about the road trip they take across America that binds them back together.
The bestselling author of Contagious explores the subtle, secret influences that affect the decisions we make—from what we buy, to the careers we choose, to what we eat—in this fascinating and groundbreaking work.
The Fortunes recasts American history through the lives of Chinese Americans and reimagines the multigenerational novel through the fractures of immigrant family experience.
Lady Cop Makes Trouble sets Constance loose on the streets of New York City and New Jersey. 
Author Tony Narducci fell in love with Tennessee Williams’ poetry when he was 14 years old. For Narducci, Williams was a genius who redefined theater in America, the greatest living playwright, and perhaps one of the greatest artists of the twentieth century. So when 33-year-old Narducci met Williams at a Key West bar in February of 1982, the encounter was more than coincidence. It was destiny. In The Frightened Heart of Me, Narducci narrates the story of how after meeting Williams he was drawn deep into the playwright’s life and work—a journey that would change Narducci’s life in every way. This biography shares how Narducci and William’s time together was an odyssey of adventure, emotional entanglement, and insight.
What can businesses do when traditional problem-solving methods no longer work? This is the conundrum today's organizations face, says strategic management expert John C. Camillus.  "More and more, the challenges we confront are so complex, so intractable, and so threatening to organizations - or entire industries - that they are best described as 'wicked,'" he contends.  In his new book, Wicked Strategies: How Companies Conquer Complexity And Confound Competitors (Rotman - UTP Publishing, August 2016), Camillus offers a comprehensive manual for identifying, responding to, and even profiting from wicked problems - by meeting them head-on with "Wicked Strategies."  
Lately, we hear more and more about how our Founding Fathers were all Christian, God-fearing men and how America is a Christian country. But, was it intended to be? According to Rev. Sarah Carpenter’s findings, the answer is no.
In this moving memoir, a woman digs into a garden and into the past and finds secrets, beauty, and acceptance.
Guapa by Saleem Haddad   Set over the course of twenty-four hours, Guapa follows Rasa, a gay man living in an unnamed Arab country, as he tries to carve out a life for himself in the midst of political and social upheaval. Rasa spends his days translating for Western journalists and pining for the nights when he can sneak his lover, Taymour, into his room. One night Rasa's grandmother — the woman who raised him — catches them in bed together. The following day Rasa is consumed by the search for his best friend Maj, a fiery activist and drag queen star of the underground bar, Guapa, who has been arrested by the police. Ashamed to go home and face his grandmother, and reeling from the potential loss of the three most important people in his life, Rasa roams the city’s slums and prisons, the lavish weddings of the country’s elite, and the bars where outcasts and intellectuals drink to a long-lost revolution. Each new encounter leads him closer to confronting his own identity, as he revisits his childhood and probes the secrets that haunt his family. As Rasa confronts the simultaneous collapse of political hope and his closest personal relationships, he is forced to discover the roots of his alienation and try to re-emerge into a society that may never accept him.
Little GANGSTER by Victor Cino   It is 1952, and in the opening pages of "Little Gangster," Joey D'Angelo, our young Sicilian protagonist, and his friend, Johnny Marino, are called late at night to First Street park where their gangster employer, Pepi Savino, is in the middle of an argument with another gangster, Nick Bonanti. Immediately after the two twelve year old boys arrive in the park, the confrontation becomes violent and Joey is told by Pepi to carry out a task which risks arrest for Joey and becomes one of the great challenges facing him in the novel. The boys have been running errands for Pepi and earning money for bets on stickball games. Joey has no moral concern about this work until he is called into the office of Peter Capra, Director of The Boys' Club of New York, and is offered an opportunity for a scholarship to a New England prep school; but there is a catch: Joey must break all ties with Pepi Savino.  
Archer’s memoir, Finding Home with The Beatles, Bob Dylan and Billy Graham is a true account of growing up inside the world of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association. For 15 years her family traversed the globe to prepare cities for Billy Graham’s large-scale, sweeping evangelistic meetings.  Her book details the gritty struggles she faced as the new kid in town and the intense anxiety of their transitory life. With humor, insight and help from two of the greatest musical forces on the planet, Archer explores the universal question of, ‘Where is home?’ Through her father’s boss, Billy Graham she finds her way toward the answer to that question.
In twenty-four absurd, lyrical, and louché episodes, “Iris Smyles” weaves a modern odyssey of trying to find one’s home in the world amid the pitfalls and insidious traps of adult life. A wickedly funny picaresque touching on quantum physics, the Donner Party, arctic exploration, Greek mythology, Rocky I, II, V, IV, VI, and III respectively, and literary immortality, Dating Tips for the Unemployed is a wistful if wry ode to that awkward age—between birth and death—when you think you know what you want but aren’t quite sure what you’re doing.
Boston is the setting for a lot of clichéd crime fiction—tough guys from Southie rob a Brink's truck, Irish-Italian gang wars, etc. Those days are over here—we’re in a post-Whitey Bulger, post- (early) Dennis Lehane Boston. In Dark Horse, Rory Flynn enters an era of smarter crime, higher corruption, different drugs, and new kinds badness. He avoids the traps and tropes. And the fake Boston accents.
If you’ve ever studied a foreign language, you know what happens when you first truly and clearly communicate with another person. As Zora O’Neill recalls, you feel like a magician. If that foreign language is Arabic, you just might feel like a wizard.
Summer 1925.  Twenty-five year-old Ernest Hemingway descended upon Pamplona, Spain, for its infamous annual bullfight fiesta with a tempestuous entourage in tow, including a femme fatale British aristocrat, a brash, handsome heir who hailed from two of New York’s great Jewish fortunes, one of America’s most celebrated comedic writers, and a down-on-his-luck childhood friend with a penchant for cynical wit.  The holiday quickly spiraled into a morass of sexual rivalry, gory spectacle, brutal hangovers, and black eyes – and gave Hemingway the material he desperately needed to make his breakthrough as a novelist.
Following his political career-ending speech before the House of Representatives, Colonel David Crockett encounters an escaped slave boy named Joseph, who teaches him that there is more to courage than flowery words, fancy shooting, and overblown legends.
In Helping Children Succeed, Paul Tough takes on a new set of pressing questions: What does growing up in poverty do to children’s mental and physical development? How does adversity at home affect their success in the classroom, from preschool to high school? And what practical steps can the adults who are responsible for them — from parents and teachers to policy makers and philanthropists — take to improve their chances for a positive future?
It’s 1942 and the Nazis are racing to be the first to build a weapon unlike any known before. They have the physicists, they have the uranium, and now all their plans depend on amassing a single ingredient: heavy water, which is produced in Norway’s Vemork, the lone plant in all the world that makes this rare substance. Under threat of death, Vemork’s engineers push production into overdrive.
How could looking at Monet’s water lily paintings help save your company millions? How can checking out people’s footwear foil a terrorist attack? How can your choice of adjective win an argument, calm your kid, or catch a thief? 
No one in Mattingly ever believed Bobby Barnes would live to see old age. Drink would either rot Bobby from the inside out or dull his senses just enough to send his truck off the mountain on one of his nightly rides. Although Bobby believes such an end possible—and even likely—it doesn’t stop him from taking his twin sons Matthew and Mark into the mountains one Saturday night. A sharp curve, blinding headlights, metal on metal, his sons’ screams. Bobby’s final thought as he sinks into blackness is a curious one—There will be stars.
Tara Marconi has made her way from Philly to "The Rock, "a remote island in Alaska governed by the seasons. Her mother's death left her unmoored, with a seemingly impassable rift between her and her father. But in this majestic, rugged frontier she works her way up the commercial fishing ladder - from hatchery assistant all the way to king crabber. Disciplined from years as a young boxer, she learns anew what it means to work, to connect, and - through an unlikely old tugboat - how to make a home she knows is her own. A testament to the places that shape us and the places that change us, The Alaskan Laundry tells one woman's unforgettable journey back to the possibility of love.
Eva and Jim are nineteen and students at Cambridge in 1958 when their paths first cross. Jim is walking along a lane when a woman approaching him on a bicycle swerves to avoid a dog. What happens next will determine the rest of their lives. We follow three different versions of their future – together, and apart – as their love story takes on different incarnations, twisting and turning to the conclusion in the present day.
The Loney is an atmospheric literary horror story. Set largely on a bleak stretch of northern coast - the Loney - it charts the strange pilgrimage to a local shrine, instigated by the narrator Smith's mother 'Mummer', of an ill assorted group, hoping to find a cure for her other son Hanny's mutism and learning difficulties. The tension builds as members of the group fall out, the locals behave oddly and a secret room is unveiled at the house where they are staying. Smith and Hanny soon find themselves embroiled in a situation beyond their comprehension, but one that will change both their lives forever.
On December 11, 1973, Mark Segal disrupted a live broadcast of the CBS Evening News when he sat on the desk directly between the camera and news anchor Walter Cronkite, yelling, “Gays protest CBS prejudice!” He was wrestled to the studio floor by the stagehands on live national television, thus ending LGBT invisibility. But this one victory left many more battles to fight, and creativity was required to find a way to challenge stereotypes surrounding the LGBT community. Mark Segal’s job, as he saw it, was to show the nation who gay people are: our sons, daughters, fathers, and mothers.
Have you ever wanted to learn a language or pick up an instrument, only to become too daunted by the task at hand? Expert performance guru Anders Ericsson has made a career studying chess champions, violin virtuosos, star athletes, and memory mavens. Peak condenses three decades of original research to introduce an incredibly powerful approach to learning that is fundamentally different from the way people traditionally think about acquiring a skill. 
Frank Delgado is no thief. He co-owns a failing Cuban restaurant in Manhattan's Upper East Side. The restaurant, like Frank, is rudderless. Lost. He decides he'll save the restaurant by traveling to Cuba to steal the legendary chicken recipe from the famed El Ajillo restaurant in Havana. The recipe is a state secret, so prized that no cook knows the whole recipe. But Frank's rationale is ironclad—Fidel stole the secret from his family, so he will steal it back. He will triumphantly bring that recipe back to Manhattan and turn his fortunes around.
Do open-floor plans really work – or do they make employees miserable? Are there companies, which really put their employees’ welfare first, and their clients second? Are annual performance reviews really necessary?
For centuries, men and women have manned lighthouses to ensure the safe passage of ships. It is a lonely job, and a thankless one for the most part. Until something goes wrong. Until a ship is in distress. In the twenty-third century, this job has moved into outer space. A network of beacons allows ships to travel across the Milky Way at many times the speed of light. These beacons are built to be robust. They never break down. They never fail. At least, they aren't supposed to.
London, 1728. Tom Hawkins is headed to the gallows, accused of murder. Gentlemen don’t hang and Tom’s damned if he’ll be the first. He may not be much of a gentleman, but he is innocent. He just always finds his way into a spot of bad luck. 
It is springtime, and two outcasts — a man ignored, even shunned by his village, and the one-eyed dog he takes into his quiet, tightly shuttered life — find each other, by accident or fate, and forge an unlikely connection. As their friendship grows, their small, seaside town suddenly takes note of them, falsely perceiving menace where there is only mishap; the unlikely duo must take to the road. 
New Orleans is a third world country in itself, a Latin, African, European (and often amoral) culture trapped in a Puritan nation. It’s everyone’s seamy underside, the city where respectable citizens go to get drunk, puke in the gutter, dance on tabletops, and go home with strangers, all without guilt. It’s the metropolitan equivalent of eating standing up—if it happened in New Orleans, it doesn’t count.
Junior year. Derrick Bowen has put in two good years getting ready for this season. He put in the work and earned his coach's trust and his role as the starting point guard for Marion East.
Allbook Books is pleased to announce the publication of Call them home by Gregory Alexander, a book over 2 years in the making. This is his debut volume of poetry. Gregory’s poems have a stream of consciousness style... evocative like a dreamscape... texturally and imagistically rich... layered with both subtle and direct emotions, and timely messages.
Today on Book Talk we look at why books are blacklisted by the American Library Association; which books have been or are currently banned; and what we should do about it.
At age forty-seven, a mother of two, Debbie Moderow was not your average Iditarod musher but that’s where she found herself when, less than 200 miles from the finish line, her dogs decided they were done running.
Every year in February, Book Talk with Kory looks at some of America’s best in African American literature. Today on Book Talk we hear excerpts from Elizabeth Hardwick’s descriptive Sleepless Nights and learn about the lives and works of Ishmael Reed, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, and James Baldwin.
One of the most reliable sources of college tuition strategies before, during, and after college that parents will ever find. Geared toward parents who are preplanning how to effectively save for their child's future college tuition as well as last-minute tuition savings advice, this invaluable resource gives no-nonsense advice from author Reyna Gobel, a recognized expert in the field of saving for college and repaying student loans. Reyna provides guidance on 529 college tuition savings plans, additional ways to save for college without breaking the bank, and repaying student loans that parents might have acquired. One of the best, most reliable sources of college tuition strategies before, during, and after college that parents will ever find!
Ruth and Nat are orphans, packed into a house full of abandoned children run by a religious fanatic. To entertain their siblings, they channel the dead. Decades later, Ruth’s niece, Cora, finds herself accidentally pregnant. After years of absence, Aunt Ruth appears, mute and full of intention. She is on a mysterious mission, leading Cora on an odyssey across the entire state of New York on foot. Where is Ruth taking them? Where has she been? And who — or what — has she hidden in the woods at the end of the road? 
When Communist Party leaders adopted the one-child policy in 1980, they hoped curbing birth-rates would help lift China’s poorest and increase the country’s global stature. But at what cost? Now, as China closes the book on the policy after more than three decades, it faces a population grown too old and too male, with a vastly diminished supply of young workers. 
From drones to Mars rovers, Our Robots, Ourselves is an exploration of the most innovative use of robots today and a provocative argument for the crucial role of humans in our increasingly technological future. David Mindell offers a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the cutting edge of robotics today, debunking commonly held myths and exploring the rapidly changing relationships between humans and machines.

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