Archive
Kory French
Dan Sharp scours Toronto’s seamy underbelly after the murder of a notorious nightspot owner, and finds his own life on the line.
Jason Cooper is a brilliant student whose flawless academic record is jeopardized by the tribulations of pledging a fraternity. His life is further complicated by his sudden and unexpected attraction to another male student, a secret he has no intention of disclosing to his devout Christian mother. 
Our mission is to bring students together with outstanding, well-respected educators and to repurpose collaborative workspaces, offices, and bookstores in order to create unique classrooms in intellectually stimulating environments.
What motivates students to learn, work hard, and persevere through life’s toughest challenges? Why is it so difficult for the world’s wealthiest and most powerful country to build good schools in every neighborhood? In Mission High, Mother Jones reporter Kristina Rizga tells intimate stories from the four years she spent immersed in one of the nation's most diverse public high schools. She follows four teachers and their remarkable students as they struggle against closure, resist pressure to focus on test scores, and create some of the most effective classrooms in the country. The unforgettable stories in these pages offer a hopeful lesson for improving all American schools.
Ever wondered how to pan-fry a steak with a charred crust and an interior that's perfectly medium-rare from edge to edge when you cut into it? How to make homemade mac & cheese that is as satisfyingly gooey and velvety-smooth as the blue box stuff, but far tastier? How to roast a succulent, moist turkey (forget about brining!)―and use a foolproof method that works every time? As Serious Eats' culinary nerd-in-residence, J. Kenji Lopez-Alt has pondered all these questions and more. In The Food Lab, Kenji focuses on the science behind beloved American dishes, delving into the interactions between heat, energy, and molecules that create great food. Kenji shows that often, conventional methods don’t work that well, and home cooks can achieve far better results using new―but simple― techniques. In hundreds of easy-to-follow recipes with over 1,000 full-color images, you will find out how to make foolproof Hollandaise sauce in just two minutes, how to transform one simple tomato sauce into a half dozen dishes, how to make the crispiest, creamiest potato casserole ever conceived, and much more.
You should get the gold medal for your diet and exercise efforts. You’ve done it all - juice cleansing, vegetarianism, raw foodism, gluten-free, Paleo™. You have a designated spot in your yoga class and on alternate days you’re committed to Spinning®, Pilates and Zumba®. So why is the body you’re hoping for not manifesting? Before you blame genetics for not looking the way you want (and you’re positive you’ve done everything possible to drop those pesky pounds), maybe there’s something you’ve missed. Fitness and nutrition expert, Danielle Pashko’s surprising insights may astonish you when you discover what you’ve been overlooking.
Brave Girls: Raising Young Women with Passion and Purpose to Become Powerful Leaders is the story and the science behind this endeavor. After interviewing hundreds of high-achieving businesswomen, Dr. Radin discovered that even the country's most accomplished female professionals were often hampered by insecurity and afraid of being considered too aggressive in a business world run largely by men. She is dedicated to uncovering the inherent strengths, value, and skills of young girls.
Social networking has grown into a staple of modern society, but its continued evolution is becoming increasingly detrimental to our lives. Shifts in communication and privacy are affecting us more than we realize or understand. Terms of Service crystallizes this current moment in technology and contemplates its implications: the identity-validating pleasures and perils of online visibility; our newly adopted view of daily life through the lens of what is share-worthy; and the surveillance state operated by social media platforms—Facebook, Google, Twitter, and others—to mine our personal data for advertising revenue, an invasion of our lives that is as pervasive as government spying.
The Best American series is the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction. Each volume’s series editor selects notable works from hundreds of magazines, journals, and websites. A special guest editor—a leading writer in the field—then chooses the best twenty or so pieces to publish. This unique system has made the Best American series the most respected—and most popular—of its kind.
Stephanie Abrams and Courtney Spritzer knew even in the earliest days of Facebook the undeniable truth of today's business world - social media could be your greatest marketing tool.  In Like, Love, Follow, these two entrepreneurial and technology-savvy women teach readers how to take a business or brand to new heights.  This book is a slice of their personal triumphs and serves as a small effort to pay-it-forward to their strong network of supporters, as well as to empower a new age of entreprenistas.
Too many Americans die each year as a result of preventable medical error — mistakes, complications, and misdiagnoses. And many more of us are not receiving the best care possible even though it’s readily available and we’re entitled to it. The key is knowing how to access it.
It’s not that he’s just not that into you—it’s that there’s not enough of him. Using a combination of demographics, game theory, and number crunching, financial and tech journalist Jon Birger explains America’s curiously lopsided dating and marriage market—and what every single, college-educated, heterosexual woman needs to know.
Constance Kopp doesn’t quite fit the mold. She towers over most men, has no interest in marriage or domestic affairs, and has been isolated from the world since a family secret sent her and her sisters into hiding fifteen years ago. One day a belligerent and powerful silk factory owner runs down their buggy, and a dispute over damages turns into a war of bricks, bullets, and threats as he unleashes his gang on their family farm. When the sheriff enlists her help in convicting the men, Constance is forced to confront her past and defend her family — and she does it in a way that few women of 1914 would have dared.
When Mark Zuckerberg announced to a cheering Oprah audience his $100 million pledge to transform the downtrodden schools of Newark, New Jersey, then mayor Cory Booker and Governor Chris Christie were beside him, vowing to help make Newark “a symbol of educational excellence for the whole nation.” But their plans soon ran into the city’s seasoned education players, fierce protectors of their billion-dollar-a-year system. It’s a prize that, for generations, has enriched seemingly everyone, except Newark’s children.
1973. That's fourteen years of prison time after Delpha Wade killed a man who was raping her. She’d wanted to kill the other one too, but he got away. It's hard to find a decent job, but Delpha's persistence pays off. She lands a secretarial job with Tom Phelan, an ex-roughneck turned neophyte private eye. Delpha is smart, prison-wise, and together the two stumble into the dark corners of Beaumont, a blue-collar, Cajun-influenced town dominated by Big Oil. A mysterious client plots mayhem against a small petrochemical company — why? Searching for a teenage boy, Phelan uncovers the weird lair of a serial killer. And Delpha — on a weekend outing — looks into the eyes of her rapist, the one who got away. The novel's conclusion is classic noir, full of surprise, excitement, and karmic justice.
What if instead of trying to avoid the pain and uncertainty of labor, we asked what we could learn from it? In telling the intimate birth stories of her three children and miscarriage, Julia shows us how giving birth can be one of motherhood’s (and life’s) greatest teachers. Rather than giving advice on how to labor or how to parent, this book consistently offers the message that a woman can grow through the challenges that life presents her and learn to trust herself. For women who share a tendency for “getting it right,” this honest and unguarded memoir is a reminder that the pretense of control is no match for the freedom of letting go.
He was more than just a cowboy. He was the top male motion picture box-office star, 1933-34-35, as selected by Motion Picture Herald; member, Aviation Hall of Fame, International Polo Hall of Fame, most widely-read syndicated newspaper columnist by 1935; wrote more than 4,000 daily and weekly newspapers columns and dozens of articles for nationally distributed magazines; wrote six books; anchored America's first coast-to-coast radio hookup in 1928; star of highly popular Sunday evening radio program of commentary and entertainment, 1933-1935.
Marvel and a Wonder is a darkly mesmerizing epic and literary page-turner set at the end of the twentieth century. In summer 1995, Jim Falls, a Korean War vet, struggles to raise his sixteen-year-old grandson, Quentin, on a farm in southern Indiana. In July, they receive a mysterious gift—a beautiful quarter horse—which upends the balance of their difficult lives. The horse’s appearance catches the attention of a pair of troubled, meth-dealing brothers and, after a violent altercation, the horse is stolen and sold. Grandfather and grandson must travel the landscape of the bleak heartland to reclaim the animal and to confront the ruthless party that has taken possession of it. Along the way, both will be forced to face the misperceptions and tragedies of their past.
No substance on earth is as hotly debated as marijuana. Opponents claim it’s dangerous, addictive, carcinogenic, and a gateway to serious drug abuse. Fans claim it as a wonder drug, treating cancer, anorexia, AIDS, chronic pain, glaucoma, arthritis, migraines, PTSD, and insomnia. Patients suffering from these conditions need—and deserve—hard facts based on medical evidence, not hysteria and superstition.
Born out of a global expedition fearlessly undertaken by a young woman, Project Animal Farm offers a riveting and revealing look at what truly happens behind farm doors.
What if you woke up with the alarming suspicion that you were being watched?
For more than 25 years, Uncle John’s Bathroom Reader has helped readers amazing things they didn’t know (and amazing things you didn’t know you didn’t know). Now, Uncle John’s tackles one of the world’s best loved and — fastest growing interests — beer.
Twenty-one-year-old Lizzie Adler had everything a young woman could want: she was beautiful, bright, and had both a faithful best friend and a handsome boyfriend with whom she was deeply in love. In one fell swoop; calamity strikes, stripping Lizzie of all that she holds dear. While driving with her best friend, Nan, en route to a party, Lizzie collides with another car.
Before he collided with a limousine, Gabriel, an Anna’s hummingbird with a head and throat cloaked in iridescent magenta feathers, could spiral 130 feet in the air, dive 60 miles per hour in a courtship display, hover, and fly backward. When he arrived in rehab caked in road grime, he was so badly injured that he could barely perch. But Terry Masear, one of the busiest hummingbird rehabbers in the country, was determined to save this damaged bird, who seemed oddly familiar. During the four months that Terry worked with Gabriel, she took in 160 hummingbirds, from a miniature nestling rescued by a bulldog and a fledgling trapped inside a skydiving wind tunnel at Universal CityWalk, to Pepper, a female Anna’s injured on a film set. In their time together, Pepper and Gabriel form a special bond and, together, with Terry’s help, learn to fly again. Woven around Gabriel and Pepper’s stories are those of other colorful birds in this personal narrative filled with the science and magic surrounding these fascinating creatures.
Cam Scott resents his mother for uprooting him from his home in Ottawa and relocating to Vientiane, Laos, and is determined to never let her forget it. Over time he adjusts to the land and culture, but just as he has found friendship and love, tragedy strikes and he is at the mercy of a stranger to clear his name for a crime he didn't commit.
In this powerful debut novel, three American soldiers haunted by their actions in Afghanistan, search for absolution and human connection in family and civilian life. Wintric Ellis joins the Army as soon as he graduates from high school, saying goodbye to his girlfriend, Kristen, and to the backwoods California town whose borders have always been the limits of their horizon. Deployed in Afghanistan two years into a directionless war, he struggles to find his bearings in a place where allies could, at any second, turn out to be foes. Two seasoned soldiers, Dax and Torres, take Wintric under their wing.
Allan Ageman is a highly dedicated and ethical professional leader with the ability to quickly and effectively implement solutions to the long term and day-to-day business challenges that are a constant in the staffing business. Allan Ageman firmly believes that he could not have achieved all of this without a great partner, Richard Bachrach, and an outstanding management team and staff that share the same vision as he does.
Today he is the inspiration for fiction adaptations, blockbuster movies, hit television shows, raucous Twitter banter, and thriving subcultures. More than a century after Sherlock Holmes first capered into our world, what is it about Arthur Conan Doyle’s peculiar creation that continues to fascinate us? Journalist and lifelong Sherlock fan Zach Dundas set out to find the answer.
Before his life went totally off the rails, Patrick O’Neil was living the punk rock dream, working at San Francisco’s legendary Mabuhay Gardens, going on to become a roadie and then the road manager for such seminal bands as Dead Kennedys, Flipper, Subhumans, and T.S.O.L. But that was before his heroin addiction veered totally out of control. A junkie for eighteen years, O’Neil, the educated son of intellectuals, eventually turned to a life of crime, ending up the ringleader of a group of armed bank robbers, all in an increasingly out-of-control attempt to keep himself and his girlfriend in drugs. Now, after a stint in prison and fourteen years clean off drugs, O’Neil takes a look back at the experiences—moving, calamitous, and at times both hilarious and terrifying—that led to his downfall and recovery. Told in sparse prose and graphic detail, GUN, NEEDLE, SPOON examines the long road to redemption, and the obstacles along the way, demystifying the “criminal life” so often depicted in film and fiction, but seldom written about from the first-hand point of view of those who have lived it.
Why would we ever want to prohibit literature from young people? Rather than banning books and the written word in our schools and libraries across the country, wouldn’t we be better off to share controversial text and teach students how to read and think critically instead? Today on Book Talk we look at why books are blacklisted by the American Library Association; which books have been or are currently banned; and what we should do about it.
Through historical data, typewritten letters, chapter challenges and personal accounts, The Joy of Missing Out, leads us on a unique exploration of the modern world, revealing how present-ness, intentionality and limited connections are the keys to our joy.
The Turners have lived on Yarrow Street for over fifty years. Their house has seen thirteen children grown and gone—and some returned; it has seen the arrival of grandchildren, the fall of Detroit’s East Side, the loss of a father.
We struggle to manage complexity every day. We follow intricate diets to lose weight, juggle multiple remotes to operate our home entertainment systems, face proliferating data at the office, and hack through thickets of regulation at tax time. But complexity isn't destiny. Sull and Eisenhardt argue there's a better way: By developing a few simple yet effective rules, you can tackle even the most complex problems.
 
Simple Rules are a hands-on tool to achieve some of our most pressing personal and professional objectives, from overcoming insomnia to becoming a better manager or a smarter investor. Simple Rules can help solve some of our most urgent social challenges from setting interest rates at the Federal Reserve to protecting endangered marine wildlife along California’s coast. 
Wakefield spent years living in squatted buildings in Europe and New York and brings firsthand knowledge to Sid’s story: How urban homesteaders lived without plumbing or electricity, how they managed their semi-legal status, and what they cared about and fought for. With Sid, Wakefield has created a character who belongs to that world and is also entirely relatable. Sid is a resourceful, intrepid young woman with a wry sense of humor; she’s great company on our journey into the lost world of New York City’s recent past.
It’s Care Week here at BreakThru Radio and today on Book Talk I will draw a connection between the generations of change that have fought to shift the focus away from the well-oiled machine of post-war American society to the Millennial driving force behind American innovation, growth, and global leadership.
Tommy Wallach - We All Looked Up
Our first book is titled, Food Truck Road Trip: A Cookbook, published by Page Street Publishing (distributed by Macmillan). It features over 100 authentic recipes, stories, and photos from 63 amazing street food vendors in 12 cities across the country. From American comfort food, to Asian and Latin American foods, to vegetarian, and even homemade dessert pops, you’re sure to find something for everyone.
Dr. Scott Sampson - How To Raise A Wild Child: The Art and Science of Falling in Love with Nature
There are a million bad dates in the city that never sleeps. Mary Geneva has been on 999,999 of them. When she moved to Manhattan in her mid-20s, Mary imagined being single in New York City would be like something out of a Hollywood movie. And it was—a horror movie. Nicknames is a look at some of the most hopeless, horrendous, and frequently hilarious dates you can imagine. Mary shares her true-life adventures looking for Mr. Right in the treacherous New York dating scene. You'll meet men so bizarre their names have been changed to protect the guilty. Our cast of characters includes: Crazy Eyes, who didn't just resemble an escapee from the local mental hospital, but proved he probably belonged there; James Bond, the mysterious South African with the secret life; Germ Sperm, a guy so classy, he actually named himself Germ Sperm! And many, many, many more. Part memoir, part self-help book, Nicknames will have you laughing out loud... and possibly abstaining from dating forever.
You are under surveillance right now. Your cell phone provider tracks your location and knows who’s with you. Your online and in-store purchasing patterns are recorded, and reveal if you’re unemployed, sick, or pregnant. Your e-mails and texts expose your intimate and casual friends. Google knows what you’re thinking because it saves your private searches. Facebook can determine your sexual orientation without you ever mentioning it.
A tense Western and an assured debut, Black River tells the story of a man marked by a prison riot as he returns to the town, and the convict, who shaped him.
Brian Chen, Shane Harris, and Dave Crenshaw
It’s What I Do, What Pet Should I Get, and The Road Less Traveled
The Other Side of The Wall is a paranormal memoir/psychological thriller set in Venice, Italy. The stories deal with the duality of life, light and dark. I believe that the light always is there and prevails if you let it. As humans we feel and experience it all. We understand one by the presence of the other. I have also expanded on many of the beautiful aspects of life-hope, belief, love, magic, self-empowerment, a higher power, angels, ghosts, humor, and the power in “giving.”
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions focuses on conceptual issues like the practice of “Normal Science,” influence of historical events, emergence of scientific discoveries, nature of scientific revolutions and progress through scientific revolutions. Kuhn's book argues that the evolution of scientific theory does not emerge from the straightforward accumulation of facts, but rather from a set of changing intellectual circumstances and possibilities.
When Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a prosperous Syrian-American and father of four, chose to stay through the storm to protect his house and contracting business. In the days after the storm, he traveled the flooded streets in a secondhand canoe, passing on supplies and helping those he could. A week later, on September 6, 2005, Zeitoun abruptly disappeared.
Drawing on his own battles with post-traumatic stress, David J. Morris — a war correspondent and former Marine — has written a humane, unforgettable book that will sit beside The Noonday Demon and The Emperor of All Maladies as the essential account of an illness.  Through interviews with people living with PTSD; forays into the rich scientific, literary, and cultural history of the condition; and memoir, Morris crafts a moving work that will speak not only to those with PTSD and their loved ones, but to all of us struggling to make sense of an anxious and uncertain time.
After losing her mother to breast cancer and having an absent father, Danielle Pashko was living as a teenager on her own in Manhattan. She worked as a model to support herself, although much of her free time was spent studying yoga, massage, holistic nutrition, and healing modalities.
Even in a parallel universe, Cleveland is still the world capital of sporting misery. So, imagine the forlorn city’s surprise when their long-suffering RFC football team is on the receiving end of the ultimate Hail Mary. It’s pure pandemonium in Brunts Stadium with just seconds to play, as the home team is on the brink of beating archrival Pittsburgh to reach the playoffs. But that’s where CIRCUS CATCH takes the strangest bounce of all time.

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