Archive
Stephanie Land is a Brooklyn-based artist whose practice is built upon a traditional photography background and developed through an acquired printmaking process. She received her B.A. in Photography at Columbia College Chicago and her M.F.A. in Printmaking at the Royal College of Art, London. Throughout the conversation Stephanie and Kimberly spoke about Stephanie’s project titled White: Silence, an installation-based exploration of her own whiteness. They also talk about anti-racism*, family histories and the importance of communication. Suggested links Color of Change SURJ Building Black Bed Stuy  Medium Tings Equator Productions TaraAura Ashya All images courtesy of the artist Stephanie Land, Alginate and Copper Wire, 2019, 168 x 96 x 12 Inches Stephanie Land, Tending To was developed as part of Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Process Space program and photographed at LMCC’s Studios in the Arts Center on Governor’s Island. Stephanie Land, Tending To was developed as part of Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Process Space program and photographed at LMCC’s Studios in the Arts Center on Governor’s Island. Stephanie Land, Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle Stephanie Land, Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle
Kimberly speaks with Matt Hulse about his recent feature length film titled ‘Sound of the Future’ and his award winning photo series.
Nicholas is a reductive painter living and working in Grand Rapids, Michigan.
This week Kimberly speaks with Philippa Tapada, a New York based attorney who talks about her experience of leaving the art field to pursue a career in law.
This week Kimberly speaks with Gelah Penn, who recently had a solo show titled Uneasy Terms at Undercurrent in Brooklyn. Throughout their conversation Gelah and Kimberly talk about Galah’s work in relation to narrative, sculpture, materiality and literature. All images by Etienne Frossard All images courtesy of the artist Ebb Tide (Site-responsive installation), 2019 Various synthetic materials, dimensions variable At ODETTA, Chelsea, NYC I/LXVI (from Clarissa Collages), 2019 I/XLVIII (from Clarissa Collages), 2019 Notes on Clarissa (Volume I), 2019 Installation of 99 collages Exhibition cards, various synthetic materials Various dimensions In “Uneasy Terms” at Undercurrent, Brooklyn, NY Notes on Clarissa (Volume II), 2019 Installation of 99 collage Exhibition cards, various synthetic materials Various dimensions In “Uneasy Terms” at Undercurrent, Brooklyn, NY Uneasy Terms by Gelah Penn at Undercurrent Uneasy Terms by Gelah Penn at Undercurrent Stele #9, 2019 Polyester mesh, lenticular plastic, plastic garbage bags, plastic mesh, silicone tubing, staples, Styrofoam ball, Velcro, eyelets, T-pins 90 x 49 x 30 inches Stele series, installation view, 2019 Various synthetic materials, dimensions variable In “Uneasy Terms” at Undercurrent, Brooklyn, NY Stele series, installation view, 2019 Various synthetic materials, dimensions variable In “Uneasy Terms” at Undercurrent, Brooklyn, NY
Edward V Kelley is an Ohio-based artist whose work explores notions of technology, memory and the absurd.
Nicole Finley is a Tulsa-based artist whose work surrounds ideas of personal narrative, home and the American Dream.
This week Kimberly speaks with Richard Bottwin, an artist and art educator who works with wood and abstraction.
Kristen Racaneillo, a partner and curator at Field Projects Gallery, an independent artist, activist and academic, talks about the Field Project’s  Corona + project, Black Lives and her thoughts on the role that art plays during difficult and distressing times. MarcelinaGonzales_CoronaCare comp from Field Projects.  
Kimberly speaks with filmmaker Megan Sperry about her current film Beyond Shelter, a documentary that explores the struggles formerly incarcerated women face when trying to reintegrate into society.
This week Kimberly speaks with Garett Yahn, a Massachusetts-based artist working in drawing. Throughout the conversation they talk about abstraction, drawing his artistic process and, of course, emojis. All images courtesy of artist
This week Kimberly speaks with UK-based Salma Ahmad Caller and NY-based artist and educator Jalilah Jackman.
This week Kimberly speaks with Elisabeth Smolarz about her at-home photography gallery Spectral Lines and  the video art exhibition she curated in the window of her apartment building and Maria Rapicavoli about her project Home Made.    
This week Kimberly speaks with Marco North about COVID’s effect on filmmaking and his new still photography project “When The World Was Small,” which consists entirely of images taken at home.
This week Kimberly speaks with Noah Gomez about his COVID-inspired video “Finding Comfort Through Lack of Control” and Erin LaSorsa about Feed the Freelancers.
This week’s episode is part one of a series of episodes highlighting the work of artists who are responding to COVID.
Aika is a second-year graduate student in Columbia’s New Genre program. Their work, a combination of sculpture and performance, explores notions of identity, tradition and the body.
Reyna Hernandez is a South Dakota based artist whose work explores ideas of identity hybridity in relation to her Indigenous bloodlines and westernized education.
Lara Americo is a transgender artist and activist who fights for social justice and LGBTQ rights.
Chrissy LaMaster is an artist whose work explores notions of motherhood, domesticity and the history and theory of craft.
Jamezie, a Boston-based transgender artist, recently graduated from The New England School of Art & Design where they concentrated in sculpture, performance, printmaking, and philosophy.
Cleo Arevalo is a conceptual artist who produces pieces that analyze the pre-established meaning of language as perceived through a multicultural filter.
Juan Rodriguez Sandoval’s work investigates and documents the ideologies and themes of locality, transnationalism, metaphysics and environmental/historical preservation.
Hedwig Brouckaert is a New York based Belgian-American artist who works with mass media imagery to create highly personal works
Kim Engelen is an international artist, art teacher, and former TEDx speaker.
Ian Swanson is a New York based artist whose monochromatic paintings embody a sense of reticent nihilism and sentimentality. Ian’s work was featured in solo and two-person exhibitions at Ashes/Ashes (New York & Los Angeles), MX Gallery (New York), Jack Barrett Gallery (New York), David Shelton Gallery (Houston, TX), Hot Wheels (Athens, GR), Simone DeSousa Gallery (Detroit, MI), among others. A Detroit native, Swanson organized exhibitions at Debt Collective (2007-2008) prior to founding ORG (2008-2010). After moving to New York City, he co-founded and directed hotelart.us from 2013-2014; and sex objex (2013-2015), a multi-disciplinary, aural/visual extension of his curatorial efforts and commitment to DIY community ethos. All images courtesy of the artist     
This week Kimberly reports from the 2020 Spring Break Art Fair.
Jeremy Dennis (b. 1990) is a contemporary fine art photographer and a tribal member of the Shinnecock Indian Nation in Southampton, NY. In his work, he explores indigenous identity, culture, and assimilation.
Nyugen E. Smith is a first generation Caribbean-American whose work considers imperialist practices of oppression, violence, and intergenerational trauma.
Michael Brennan is a New York based painter and instructor of color theory at Pratt Institute. His minimalist and abstract paintings are often influenced by cinema and film history.
Jean Rim is a New York based artist whose work explores personal memories through an abstract process of layering.
William Norton is a New York based artist whose autobiographical work connects his roots of growing up in Japan with his complex history of dealing with the disappearance of his 4-year-old son in 1990.
Christina Graham is a New York-based painter.
Christine Tyler is a Brooklyn-based artist who received her MFA from Brooklyn College in 2019
Ninth Street Collective is a group of art administrators, gallerists, curators, writers and critics who want to help artists succeed. With a focus on professional development, we offer one-on-one consultations with artists in-person and online, and serve as a hub for resources for artists. Project Members of Ninth Street Collective, include: Courtney Childress Audra Lambert Shama Rahman Melinda Wang Heather Zises Images of past projects courtesy of Ninth Street Collective Courtney Childress SPRING/BREAK Art Show Audra Lambert The Subtle Image Curated by Antecedent Projects at Dejavu Gallery Melinda Wang Margaret Inga Urias at Equity Gallery Heather Zises Melinda Wang 2017: 1947 at Equity Gallery Audra Lambert Domicile at Fountain House Gallery Curated by Antecedent Projects Heather Zises Reflective Pool at The Cluster Gallery Courtney Childress Yours, mine & ours Melinda Wang Evening Red at MW Projects Audra Lambert Marking Time, Shifting Space Solo Exhibition in DUMBO (featuring artist Victoria Manganiello) Curated by Antecedent Projects Melinda Wang Karen Lee Williams at Equity Gallery 50 Contemporary Women Artists by Heather Zises
Michelle Brandemuehl is a Brooklyn-based artist whose abstract and minimal paintings explore the relationship between subtlety and the sublime. Michelle has had two solo shows at ATA Gallery in San Fransisco in 2018 and 2015 and she was in a two person exhibition with Michele King at Avenue, also in San Fransisco. Other group exhibitions include, Everyday Animals at Ulterior Gallery, JuxtaPositions at the Painting Center, and Introductions 2018 at Trestle Gallery, all located in New York City. She was an artist in residence at: PADA Studio Residency in Lisbon, Portugal; Edward F. Albee Foundation in Montauk, NY; and CCA Residency at AICAD Studios in Brooklyn. She received her BS in painting from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. She currently has work up at Ulterior Gallery All images courtesy of the artist Roundabout spray paint and acrylic on board, 24×20, 2018 Go Go Go acrylic and spray paint on board, 30×24, 2019 Vicious Circle acrylic and spray paint on panel, 18×14, 2019 Shake It spray paint and acrylic on board, 40×30, 2019 acrylic, spray paint and marble dust on board, 24×18, 2015 It Goes Something Like This 1 acrylic, spray paint and marble dust on board, 24×18, 2015 This is How We Survive the Universe acrylic, spray paint and marble dust on board, 10×8 each, 2016 Elevator Hum spray paint, acrylic, molding paste and marble dust on linen, 24×18, 2017 It Goes Something Like This 4 acrylic, spray paint and marble dust on board, 24×18, 2015 It Goes Something Like This 3
Kimberley Acebo Arteche (she/they) is an educator, cultural worker, and interdisciplinary artist. Her work explores the hybrid cultures formed by technology, movements of immigrants in America, and the way movements through space and spaces has been affected by these two. Arteche received her BFA from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and MFA from San Francisco State University where she received the School of Art’s Distinguished Graduate award. She has been awarded the Murphy Cadogan Contemporary Art Award by the San Francisco Foundation, was Kearny Street Workshop’s Featured Visual Artist in the 2015 APAture Festival, and residencies at the Vermont Studio Center and the Growlery. She has shown at East Tennessee State University, SOMArts Cultural Center and at the Wailoa Arts & Cultural Center in Hilo, Hawaii. Arteche is committed to collaboratively creating decolonial practices within arts institutions, while creating visibility and providing resources for emerging Asian Pacific American and BIPOC Artists. All images courtesy of the artist  

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