Categories
Culture
Learning about how enhancing the productivity and incomes of smallholder family farmers is key to progress, according to Barbara Ekwall.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's disingenuous charity scam, our end-of-the-year round-up, and listener mail.
We learn about the state of food insecurity in the world and how about 793 million people are undernourished globally, down 167 million over the last decade.
The US has a new name for its endless war, and listener mail.
Barbara Ekwall begins with the various ways FAO of The United Nations defines hunger and what regions are primarily focused in its initiatives.
Congress finally jettisons the punishments imposed by No Child Left Behind, and listener mail.
Ann Fensterstock is the author of the book Art On The Block. The book charts the history of the New York art world over the last sixty years. Unlike other cultural and business districts in New York, the hub of the art scene has had a tendency to pick up and move. Over the last six decades artists and galleries have moved from uptown to downtown, spread across lower Manhattan, and set up shop across the East River in Brooklyn. Art on the Block tells the story of this migration and explores why the art world doesn't stay put.
We speak with Barbara Ekwall, Senior Liaison Officer at the North America Office of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
Obama expands the ground war in Iraq, and listener mail.
To cut back on the food we waste, Dana Gunders gives some simple steps, like making strategic grocery lists or putting leftovers in plain sight in the fridge.
A love story about second chances, and also Merry Christmas.
Main causes of waste occurs due to poor planning and overbuying as well as from food being stored improperly, according to Dana Gunders, Staff Scientist on Food and Agriculture.
We revisit two of our favorite holiday segments, the insecure chef and a story about being a gift wrapper at Cartier.
Practical strategies, checklists, and educational infographics on reducing waste with recipes like Sour Milk Pancakes and Buried Chocolate Avocado Mousse.
Jesse Myerson joins us to discuss how and why we should do away with private housing, robots who can say no to humans, and listener mail.
Dana Gunders talks with us about why she wrote the Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook and how 40 percent of food in America goes to waste.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Bad Decisions" and features Matt Dennie, Jessica Williamson, Laura Willcox and Adam Wade.
We run down some of our favorite Christmas movies.
Hannah Barrett is a painter based in Brooklyn. Her work draws from a range of subject matter including old cookbooks, vintage fashion, 1960s advertising imagery, characters from classic literature, and really anything else that strikes a chord in Hannah's visual imagination. All these elements are brought together in portraits, still lives, and domestic scenes that blend the surreal with the everyday and seem to imply an entire world in each painting. To me, there's something both familiar and strange about Hannah's paintings, and it's a quality that allows the viewers imagination to run just as wild as I'm sure Hannah's does when she's painting.
Dana Gunders, staff scientist focused on food and agriculture, speaks with us about reducing food waste and her book, Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook.
The got to go list and the importance of keeping the most challenging students, and listener mail on education.
Dr. Azra Raza discusses how the FDA has created inertia as it continues to recognize these models as the gold standard for predicting the utility of drugs.
Julia Carrie Wong joins us to discuss a fatal police shooting in San Francisco, Paige Shell-Spurling joins us to discuss auto workers compensation in Colombia, and listener mail.
Dr. Azra Raza discusses her decision early on to concentrate research on freshly obtained human cells and not to rely on mice or petri dishes alone.
Ayesha Siddiqi joins us to discuss Islamophobia in the US, Britney Summit Gil joins us to discuss the empathy gap in the corporate media, and reactions to the GOP debate.
Dr. Azra Raza speaks with us about the case of Sepsis where mice modeling proved to be a useless tactic in developing a drug for humans.
Ryan Schleeter joins us to discuss the Paris Climate Summit, sex panic over a Serena Williams magazine cover, and listener mail.
Part 2 with Dr. Azra Raza, the Director of the MDS Center at Columbia University, discusses the history and standardization of the synthesized model system used in cancer research.
The final agreement from the Paris climate summit is historic but leaves much to be desired, details on the end of No Child Left Behind, and Cuomo's task force walks away from Common Core.
Video artist Janaye Brown makes single-shot videos based around the surreal and mundane moments of everyday life. In a four minute piece called Cocktail Hour, a room filled with fog slowly clears to reveal two figures sitting awkwardly in a living room as a clock is heard ticking off screen. In another video, called Late Spring, we watch for two minutes as insects swarm around a brightly lit bell tower. The Lynchian piece Rocks, With Salt frames a blank patch of sand on the beach that appears to be breathing.
Dr. Azra Raza, the Director of the MDS Center at Columbia University in New York, NY, speaks with us about the hazard in using mouse models for drug research.
Anna Lekas Miller joins us to discuss how Syrians are reacting to Trump's proposal to ban Muslims, former cop Daniel Holtzclaw is found guilty of sexually assault, and Donald Trump on the death penalty.
Dan Sharp scours Toronto’s seamy underbelly after the murder of a notorious nightspot owner, and finds his own life on the line.
The struggle to sustain quality international reporting in a digital age, yet it's importance in understanding international leaders.
A new poll shows GOP voters overwhelmingly support Trump's plan to ban Muslims from entering the US, a political science theory that attempts to explain xenophobia in the GOP, and white nationalists get a Trump bump.
Marvin Kalb continues the conversation on how to build future relations with Russia despite Putin's purely nationalistic motives.
Trump's rhetoric and the US media's struggle to retain the veneer of objectivity.
Part 3 with Marvin Kalb on the world was stunned when Vladimir Putin invaded and seized Crimea in March 2014.
Maysoon Zayid joins us to discuss Donald Trump's latest comments on banning Muslims from entering the US, our thoughts on Obama's Oval Office speech, and listener mail.
Part 2 with Marvin Kalb, a former journalist and Harvard professor, wrote a book called Imperial Gamble: Putin, Ukraine, and the New Cold War.
Todd Miller joins us to discuss his time at the Paris Climate Summit, thoughts on Texas' anti-Syrian refugee lawsuit, and listener mail on Divergent.
This week on the show I speak with multi-media artist Orlando Estrada. Orlando creates installations, sculptures, and performances inspired by his years living in Florida, his background in queer theory, and experiences he had growing up in a family of spiritual mediums.
We speak with Marvin Kalb, a former journalist and Harvard professor, wrote a book called Imperial Gamble: Putin, Ukraine, and the New Cold War.
Mariame Kaba joins us to discuss the police killing of Laquan McDonald in Chicago, Texas sues to keep the government from resettling any more refugees there, and listener mail.
The outrageous Maria Heinegg pays George a visit to discuss her active bisexual-vegan-crossfit-and-many-more-hyphens lifestyle. They talk about hangovers, Maria's fashion sense, and celebrities that have done jail time!
Jason Cooper is a brilliant student whose flawless academic record is jeopardized by the tribulations of pledging a fraternity. His life is further complicated by his sudden and unexpected attraction to another male student, a secret he has no intention of disclosing to his devout Christian mother. 
Learning how LeanPath Inc. creates a technological system that addresses the food waste crisis in America.
Reactions to the mass shooting in San Bernardino, Texas sues federal government to halt Syrian refugee resettlement, and listener mail.
Part 2 with Andrew Shakman, the CEO of LeanPath, Inc., on personal ways to prevent food waste.
World AIDS Day and the continuing criminalization of people with HIV, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel fires police chief, and listener mail.
We speak with Andrew Shakman, a food waste prevention advocate and the CEO of LeanPath, a food-saving technology service.
Peter Cole joins us to discuss how unions can combat xenophobia, Paris clamps down on climate summit protests.
David and Austin have continued the collaborative work. Fallen Fruit began by mapping fruit trees growing on or over public property in Los Angeles.
Thoughts on the Planned Parenthood shooting, and Trump and Cruz each put forward total falsehoods.
Stephen Fan is a designer and adjunct assistant professor in the Art History and Architectural Studies department at Connecticut College. His latest project is a traveling exhibition and book called Sub-Urbanisms: Casino Urbanization, Chinatowns and the Contested American Landscape. The project studies the ways that immigrant Chinese casino workers in Connecticut have converted single family homes into multi-family communities. In his project, we see how the social and aesthetic norms of American suburban living are transformed and re-interpreted to suit the cultural beliefs and lifestyles of immigrant workers. For example, in these homes, a patio space becomes an extra kitchen for communal cooking, extra walls are added to the living room to create new bedrooms, and front lawns are repurposed as gardens for growing Chinese produce.
The collective seeks to bring reflection and activism in taking an artistic approach to agriculture in America.
We spend the hour on listener mail.
Our mission is to bring students together with outstanding, well-respected educators and to repurpose collaborative workspaces, offices, and bookstores in order to create unique classrooms in intellectually stimulating environments.
Part 2 with Scott Zdrazil discusses shareholder engagement with fossil fuel companies and The Accountability Project.
The most exciting activism at a recent drug reform conference, and listener mail about teaching.
Scott Zdrazil, Director of Corporate Governance at Amalgamated Bank, discusses shareholder engagement with fossil fuel companies.
John went to a surveillance conference for the third year straight, and listener mail about classroom management techniques.
Reid Capalino coordinates and advises the firm’s work on behalf of companies seeking to make New York City more resilient and sustainable.
White supremacists are suspected of shooting five black protesters in Minneapolis, and Turkey shoots down a Russian fighter Jet.
Helen Rosenthal discusses the responsibility of public officials and calls for a financial study on the detriment of fossil fuel investments.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Sports" and features Jeff Hiller, Jim O'Grady, Silvija Ozols and Adam Wade.
Natasha Lennard and Lukas Hermsmeier join us to discuss Germany's treatment of refugees, and catching up on Trump and Rubio.
Mika Kaurismäki is the director of the new film The Girl King. The film tells the story of Queen Kristina of Sweden, who in the 17th century at the age of eighteen attempted to modernize Sweden and has become known as one of the earliest feminist figures in Europe.
We speak with Austin Young, cofounder of Fallen Fruit, an art collaboration bringing people together with fresh fruit.
The FBI is tasked with preventing ISIS-inspired rampage shooting but not other gun violence, the media response to violence world wide, and listener mail.
The hilarious Joe Zimmerman drops in for a visit with George at the Spit Take Comedy studio. They discuss the highs and lows of the Spin Doctors catalog, as well as play and exciting game of Andrew Jackson: Did He Do That?
What motivates students to learn, work hard, and persevere through life’s toughest challenges? Why is it so difficult for the world’s wealthiest and most powerful country to build good schools in every neighborhood? In Mission High, Mother Jones reporter Kristina Rizga tells intimate stories from the four years she spent immersed in one of the nation's most diverse public high schools. She follows four teachers and their remarkable students as they struggle against closure, resist pressure to focus on test scores, and create some of the most effective classrooms in the country. The unforgettable stories in these pages offer a hopeful lesson for improving all American schools.
Cynthia Ogden, epidemiologist and expert in obesity, discusses results from a study on the prevalence of obesity in adults and youth from 2011 to 2014.
Indiana's governor attempts to block a Syrian family scheduled to be resettled in Indianapolis, and listener mail in response to Ali Gharib's segment earlier this week.
Part 2 with Robert Blum from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public health on the corporate and political influences in US dietary guidelines.
The increasingly hawkish US press calls on Obama to intensify war against ISIS, anti-refugee historical parallels in the 20th Century, and listener mail.
Everything from advertisement to undisclosed sugar additives in food are some of the leading causes of the childhood obesity epidemic in America.
Ali Gharib joins us to discuss the Paris attacks, and our thoughts on the anti-refugee aftermath.
Part 2 with a member of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public health on the advertising strategies used by Food companies influencing obesity in children.
The US enters a new phase in the war against ISIS, Boston looks to charterize 36 public schools, and listener mail. Today's show was recorded before the attacks in Paris.
Artist Roxanne Jackson has taken an unconventional approach to her life as an artist. Before going to grad school to study art she worked as a river guide in California, got a degree in botany and spent winters teaching snowboarding in Colorado.
Professor of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public health discusses corporate advertising and the strategies used to influence the food choices of American children.
Ryan Schleeter on Obama's rejection of the Keystone Pipeline, the selective conservative defense of free speech, and listener mail.
Ever wondered how to pan-fry a steak with a charred crust and an interior that's perfectly medium-rare from edge to edge when you cut into it? How to make homemade mac & cheese that is as satisfyingly gooey and velvety-smooth as the blue box stuff, but far tastier? How to roast a succulent, moist turkey (forget about brining!)―and use a foolproof method that works every time? As Serious Eats' culinary nerd-in-residence, J. Kenji Lopez-Alt has pondered all these questions and more. In The Food Lab, Kenji focuses on the science behind beloved American dishes, delving into the interactions between heat, energy, and molecules that create great food. Kenji shows that often, conventional methods don’t work that well, and home cooks can achieve far better results using new―but simple― techniques. In hundreds of easy-to-follow recipes with over 1,000 full-color images, you will find out how to make foolproof Hollandaise sauce in just two minutes, how to transform one simple tomato sauce into a half dozen dishes, how to make the crispiest, creamiest potato casserole ever conceived, and much more.
Ksenia Gnedeva, from the Laboratory of Sensory Neuroscience at Rockefeller University , on research into super-fine ear hair restoration.
Catching up on the GOP debate, and listener mail.
Part 2 of our interview with Allen Gibbs who has been conducting an unusual series of studies on obese fruit flies.
Dave Zirin joins us to discuss the protests at the University of Missouri, the Senate torture report is in a bizarre limbo, and listener mail.
Allen Gibbs, a professor of Life Sciences at the University of Nevada who has been conducting an unusual series of studies on obese fruit flies.
The student protest at Mizzou forces top school two administrators to resign, and the ethics of media interacting with protesters.
Part 2 with Blaire van Valkenburgh, a paleontologist, on how hyper-carnivores, such as the sabre-tooth tiger, used their super-strengths to regulate herbivores.
MSF releases its investigation into the US bombing of its hospital in Kunduz, a tasteless Bronx is Burning party in the south Bronx, and listener mail.
Photographer Carolyn Russo has been traveling the world photographing the architecture of air traffic control towers. These essential, but often overlooked, structures are the subject of Carolyn's new book and National Air and Space Museum exhibition Art of the Airport Tower.
Valkenburgh uncovers Pleistocene-era teeth and examines them to determine exactly how these giant predators survived.
Parker Molloy joins us to discuss a loss for trans rights in Houston, and the ethics of autonomous machines.
You should get the gold medal for your diet and exercise efforts. You’ve done it all - juice cleansing, vegetarianism, raw foodism, gluten-free, Paleo™. You have a designated spot in your yoga class and on alternate days you’re committed to Spinning®, Pilates and Zumba®. So why is the body you’re hoping for not manifesting? Before you blame genetics for not looking the way you want (and you’re positive you’ve done everything possible to drop those pesky pounds), maybe there’s something you’ve missed. Fitness and nutrition expert, Danielle Pashko’s surprising insights may astonish you when you discover what you’ve been overlooking.
Part 2 of our interview with Matthias Ruth on NASA-sponsored study that points to the interrelated factors that cause human civilizations to collapse.
The continuing disgrace of family detention, the similarities between de Blasio and Bloomberg on school segregation, and listener mail.
Matthias Ruth is speaking us about a new study partly-sponsored by NASA that highlights the unsustainable human-nature dynamics that lead to a civilization's collapse.
Sarah Leonard and Atossa Abrahamian join us to discuss austerity, Greece, and buying and selling citizenship.
Kathryn Morris, a chemical ecologist at Xavier University, speaks with us about her study of interconnected fungi.
Will Potter joins us to discuss CMUs, otherwise known as Little Guantanamo Bay prisons, restarting negotiations on how to end the Syrian Civil War, and listener mail.
Part 2 of our interview with Dr. Eran Tauber on the potential in finding a synergy of how ancient DNA sequences influence animal behavior during seasonal changes.
Frontline's AC Thompson joins us to discuss his investigation into a string of murders in the 1980s that targeted Vietnamese-American journalists, and Success Academy's “got to go” policy.
Jenni Olson is the director of the new film, The Royal Road. She describes the film as a cinematic essay, and it's structure is simple: patient static shots of urban California landscapes captured on 16 mm film, and a voiceover narration written and spoken by Jenni.
We speak with Dr. Eran Tauber on his research into 700 million year-old DNA sequences from ancient animals and how they influenced modern species.
Anna Lekas Miller joins us to discuss Turkey's crackdown on the press and leftists in advance of the election, the US releases Shaker Aamer from Guantanamo, and listener mail.
Brave Girls: Raising Young Women with Passion and Purpose to Become Powerful Leaders is the story and the science behind this endeavor. After interviewing hundreds of high-achieving businesswomen, Dr. Radin discovered that even the country's most accomplished female professionals were often hampered by insecurity and afraid of being considered too aggressive in a business world run largely by men. She is dedicated to uncovering the inherent strengths, value, and skills of young girls.
We look into the potential benefits of electronic health services for chronic diseases and the future of healthcare.
The GOP debate leaves all of us a little worse off, the secret story of how four lawyers gave the OK on the bin Laden raid, following up on a NYC school diversity story, and listener mail.
Listen to part 2 of our interview with Dr. Abdel-Kader, an assistant professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University.
The DOJ opens an investigation into a school officer's assault of a young black woman in a South Carolina high school, SXSW succumbs to a heckler's veto, the Senate passes CISA, and listener mail.
Listen to part 1 of our interview with Dr. Abdel-Kader, an assistant professor at the school of Medicine at Vanderbilt University.
A school cop assaults a child in a South Carolina high school, Jim Comey repeats allegations of the so-called “Ferguson Effect,” and Obama weighs deepening troops' mission in Iraq and Syria.
Listen to part 2 of our interview with Vanessa Mason, founder of Riveted Partners, on the need for more diversity in digital health development.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Work" and features Josh Sharp, Michael Kayne and Jo Firestone.
Frontline's Martin Smith joins us to discuss his new documentary Inside Assad's Syria, the Obama administration decides it will move to limit testing, and listener mail.
Photographer Brian Ulrich has spent the last 15 years photographing the landscape of American consumerism. After 9/11, when the Bush administration encouraged all of us to go shopping, Brian travelled the country making images of big box chains, thrift stores, and later the abandoned shopping complexes that started popping up as the economy slid into the Great Recession.
We speak with Vanessa Mason, a digital health product strategist, on how e-health products can help underserved communities.
Climate change is threatening the security of Iraq, Clinton testifies before the Benghazi committee, and more listener mail on wheelhouses.
Social networking has grown into a staple of modern society, but its continued evolution is becoming increasingly detrimental to our lives. Shifts in communication and privacy are affecting us more than we realize or understand. Terms of Service crystallizes this current moment in technology and contemplates its implications: the identity-validating pleasures and perils of online visibility; our newly adopted view of daily life through the lens of what is share-worthy; and the surveillance state operated by social media platforms—Facebook, Google, Twitter, and others—to mine our personal data for advertising revenue, an invasion of our lives that is as pervasive as government spying.
Allison Sutter, a certified coach, best selling author, and entrepreneur talks with us about overcoming the fear of public speaking.
Cora Currier on the Kill Chain and the Drone Papers, fact checking MSNBC's apology for its Israel map, and the difference between gentrification and integration.
Listen to part 2 of our interview with Dr. Edward Day, Chair at the Department of Sociology at Chapman University on Americans and their fears for 2015.
PBS runs a story critical of Success Academy, Benjamin Netanyahu blames a Palestinian mufti for the holocaust, and listener mail.
Dr. Edward Day, Chair at the Department of Sociology at Chapman University talks about his study into the top fears of Americans for 2015.
Ryan Devereaux joins us to discuss Operation Haymaker and the Drone Papers, a defendant in the 9/11 trial at Guantanamo wants to defend himself, and another school integration battle in NYC.
Part 2 of our interview with David Altheide on how much of the fear around us is unwarranted.
Frontline's Michael Camerini joins us to discuss his new documentary on immigration reform, a US drone strike kills an al Qaeda figure in Syria, and listener mail.
This week on the show I talk with filmmaker and anthropologist J.P.Sniadecki about his new documentary The Iron Ministry. J.P. spent three years traveling through China by train, and in the film, he weaves countless trips into one impressionistic journey of people, sound, and clanking metal. We talk about trains in China, non-narrative documentary, and what it's like to make a documentary on a train.
Professor David Altheide speaks with us about fear-mongering in American media.
Obama's delayed drawdown in Afghanistan means the next president can scale back up, NYPD cop gets felony for lying about arrest of NYT photographer, Success Academy wants that sweet city money with no oversight, and Molly's triumphant return.
The Best American series is the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction. Each volume’s series editor selects notable works from hundreds of magazines, journals, and websites. A special guest editor—a leading writer in the field—then chooses the best twenty or so pieces to publish. This unique system has made the Best American series the most respected—and most popular—of its kind.
Listen to part 2 of our interview with Zi Jing Wong in creating a scalable invisibility cloak for potential military use.
Anna Lekas Miller joins us to discuss the worsening Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon, the Intercept publishes a new set of leaked documents on the drone war, artists sneak anti-Homeland graffiti onto the set of Homeland, and listener mail.
Listen to Zi Jing Wong speak about the breakthrough research at UC Berkeley in creating a scalable invisibility cloak.
Meredith Clark joins us to discuss the first Democratic presidential debate, catching up on the violence in Israel and Palestine, and listener mail.
Listen to our interview with Dr. Steve Croft from the SETI Center at UC Berkeley and his work on advanced radio telescopes to survey the sky.
The wife of a jailed Saudi blogger speaks out against her husband's imprisonment, and listener mail.
Listen to part 2 of our conversation with professor Ann Ross, an anthropologist at North Carolina State University on forensic anthropology.
GOP in disarray after leading replacement for Boehner drops out of speaker race, and listener mail.
Rodney Asher is the director of the new documentary, The Nightmare. The film tells the stories of eight people who chronically suffer from a terrifying disorder called sleep paralysis. During sleep paralysis sufferers wake up to find themselves unable to move or speak, and many experience extremely vivid and frightening visual and auditory hallucinations.
Listen to our conversation with professor Ann Ross who led a forensic-anthropological study on fingerprints.
A Guantanamo Bay art exhibit goes where Obama fears to tread, activists claim potential Internet domains for Eva Moskowitz, and listener mail.
Stephanie Abrams and Courtney Spritzer knew even in the earliest days of Facebook the undeniable truth of today's business world - social media could be your greatest marketing tool.  In Like, Love, Follow, these two entrepreneurial and technology-savvy women teach readers how to take a business or brand to new heights.  This book is a slice of their personal triumphs and serves as a small effort to pay-it-forward to their strong network of supporters, as well as to empower a new age of entreprenistas.
Solutions on mending a system of many holes as our justice system by Sean Arthurs, Harvard Professor.
Mike Konczal joins us to discuss free college, Afghanistan is the deadliest country in the world for aid workers, and listener mail.
Part 2 of speaker Sean Arthurs, a Doctoral Candidate in the Education Leadership Program at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
US keeps changing its story on how it bombed a hospital in Afghanistan, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is leaving the Obama administration, and listener mail.
A discussion on the many existing cases of the U.S. federal government's policy of preemptive prosecutions of innocent people.
Obama waives sanctions for the sixth year for countries that use child soldiers, and advice from one listener to another about leaving an unfulfilling job.
Listen to part 2 of Harvard Law Professor on the faults in America's justice system and recounting stories of false incarcerations.
A parable about integration in Dumbo, Brooklyn, thoughts on the mass shooting in Oregon, and the US bombs a Doctors Without Borders hospital in Afghanistan.
Michael Madsen is an artist and filmmaker. In his new documentary The Visit, he tackles perhaps one of the biggest questions of all: What would happen if intelligent life from another world landed on Earth?
Seán Arthurs, a Doctoral Candidate at Harvard Law School, discusses the problematic holes in America's justice system.
Anna Therese Day and Mouaz Moustafa join us for Radio Dispatch Live to discuss the war in Syria and the resulting humanitarian and refugee crisis.
Too many Americans die each year as a result of preventable medical error — mistakes, complications, and misdiagnoses. And many more of us are not receiving the best care possible even though it’s readily available and we’re entitled to it. The key is knowing how to access it.
Makers at the faire explain their showcases of different technology, from funky piano synthesizers to different fun gadgets to toy with using technology.
Victoria Law joins us to discuss the lack of prenatal care in prisons, Russian airstrikes target rebels instead of ISIS, and listener mail.
We speak with a host of scientists, engineers, and innovators on cutting edge technology at the Maker Faire in Flushing, Queens.
Laurie Penny joins us to discuss Jeremy Corbyn's election to head of the Labour party in Britain, a Congressional hearing on Planned Parenthood illustrates the GOP's continuing war on women, and listener mail.
We speak with a host of scientists, engineers, and innovators on cutting edge technology at the Maker Faire in Flushing, Queens.
Ryan Devereaux joins us to discuss the latest developments in the disappearance of 43 students from a school in Mexico, and police pre-crime units spread throughout the country.
We speak with representative of Google's drone-delivery system and learn a bit more on the advancing technology of laser cutting machines.
Ben Carson and Jeb Bush show their true selves, and a Brooklyn story about how gentrification works.
Artist Rithika Merchant's new series, Luna Tabulatorum, tell a story inspired by the moon. In the paintings human-like figures, animals, plant life, and other strange beings interact in symbolic rituals that evoke both religious and folk art tradition as well as the work of painters like Frida Khalo. Myths and Folklore inform a lot of the imagery in Luna Tabulatorum and Rithika is drawn to the fact that moon has played a significant role in the stories of gods, creation and the universe in ancient cultures from Greece to India. Rithika's series is on view now at Stephen Romano Gallery in Bushwick, and last week Rithika joined me via Skype from Barcelona to talk about her work, the moon, and ways that woman and femininity are portrayed in art and mythology.
We speak with the president of an Italian digital company creating some of the fastest 3D printers and also developing a 3D printer for smart phones.
We spend the hour catching up on listener mail.
It’s not that he’s just not that into you—it’s that there’s not enough of him. Using a combination of demographics, game theory, and number crunching, financial and tech journalist Jon Birger explains America’s curiously lopsided dating and marriage market—and what every single, college-educated, heterosexual woman needs to know.
Check out people spilling the details on what makes them the most stressed and the tactics they use to mitigate that stress.
Obama has promised to allow ten thousand Syrian refugees into the US in the coming year, police response to the arrest of Ahmed Mohamed, and listener mail.
Listen to people from New York City explain the greatest stressors in their life and give helpful tips on how to manage stress.
Newspaper editorial boards criticize the opt-out movement, and listener mail.
Listen in to part 2 of our interview on the uses of neurological research to create wearable technology that relieves stress.
Black children get fewer painkillers in the ER than white kids, Matt Damon is wrong on the importance of black directors and showrunners, and listener mail.
We speak with representatives of Thync, the first wearable technology to influence how you feel.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Nightmares" and features Mike Kelton, Silvija Ozols, Laura Willcox and Adam Wade.
A Slate piece on the first-person essay economy, thoughts on Biden, Hillary, and Bernie, and listener mail.
For the several years photographer Daniel Cronin attended The Gathering of the Juggalos, an annual festival for die-hard fans of the horrorcore rap group The Insane Clown Posse. In his photographs, Daniel depicts Juggalos of every stripe, likening his approach to that of early 20th century German photographer August Sander who made egalitarian portraits of his countrymen. These photographs have been published in a book by Prestel, and I spoke with Daniel over the phone from Portland about his experiences at Gathering, misconceptions about Juggalo culture and some of his other projects.
We speak with Lee Rainie, the director of internet, science and technology research at Pew Research Center.
Alexis Goldstein joins us to discuss the second GOP debate, and Molly's latest story on how what happened to Ahmed Mohamed.
The delightful Maeve Higgins pays a visit to the Spit Take Comedy couch to discuss living in NYC, her prowess at pranks and the best Summer jams of 2015. George also reveals Maeve’s amazing psychic abilities in a segment called “Does Maeve Higgins Have Psychic Powers?”
Constance Kopp doesn’t quite fit the mold. She towers over most men, has no interest in marriage or domestic affairs, and has been isolated from the world since a family secret sent her and her sisters into hiding fifteen years ago. One day a belligerent and powerful silk factory owner runs down their buggy, and a dispute over damages turns into a war of bricks, bullets, and threats as he unleashes his gang on their family farm. When the sheriff enlists her help in convicting the men, Constance is forced to confront her past and defend her family — and she does it in a way that few women of 1914 would have dared.
Climate change activists share stories of protesting and demand the building of a renewable future.
Jeff Abbott joins us to discuss the latest developments in Guatemala, a round up of the second GOP debate, and listener mail.
We hear from a senior climate change activist who shares stories about protesting with 350.org in Washington DC.
Texas police officers arrest a Muslim teenager for building a clock, the Assad regime continues to bomb the suburbs of Damascus, and predictions for the second GOP debate.
We learn from the Climate Change rally the greatest obstacles towards using renewable energies and how to combat them for the future.
Anna Lekas Miller joins us from Turkey to discuss the refugee crisis, the Seattle Teacher Strike enters its second week, and the Assad regime continues to indiscriminately bomb suburbs of Damascus.
Bill McKibbens and Naomi Klein lay out the calculations on fossil fuel's damage to the environment and how July was the hottest recorded month in history.
New study says age of criminal responsibility should be 21, are top officials cooking the books on airstrikes against ISIS, and listener mail.
Fred Ritchin is an authority on the future of photography. He's written several books on the subject, and his newest, Bending the Frame: Photojournalism, Documentary and the Citizen, is published by Aperture. In the book Ritchin takes a critical look at the state of documentary photography and visual journalism in the twenty-first century media landscape. Richin wonders, do photographs still have any power in a world where billions of images are made, shared, linked, and liked every day? Bending the Frame also asks the question: how can photojournalists and citizens use photography to help solve some of the world's problems, rather than just document them?
Hear from Bill McKibbens and Naomi Klein on the global movement in demanding climate change action from world leaders.
Obama promises to accept 10,000 Syrian refugees in the coming year, Biden goes on Colbert for an emotional interview, and Molly saw the new Black Panther documentary.
When Mark Zuckerberg announced to a cheering Oprah audience his $100 million pledge to transform the downtrodden schools of Newark, New Jersey, then mayor Cory Booker and Governor Chris Christie were beside him, vowing to help make Newark “a symbol of educational excellence for the whole nation.” But their plans soon ran into the city’s seasoned education players, fierce protectors of their billion-dollar-a-year system. It’s a prize that, for generations, has enriched seemingly everyone, except Newark’s children.
Check out part 2 of our interview with Brian Nosek about how open source software connects scientists like never before.
Nearly a decade and a half after 9/11 it's clear bin Laden changed the US forever, update on the citywide Seattle teachers' strike, Trump mocks Fiorina's face, REM blasts Trump and Cruz, and Walker says no more Syrian refugees.
Learn about the Center for Open Science with Executive Director, Brian Nosek and the changing transparency in science.
Obama's drone policy gets adopted by Britain and Pakistan, schools in NYC propose an integration plan, and listener mail on how gender gets expressed in all kinds of different ways.
Listen to part 2 of our interview with Jason Hibbets on the possibility of an Open Source City.
David Petraeus’s weird, wild plan to defeat ISIS, white people on Trump, the wrong ways that coupled people talk to single people, and listener mail.
Listen to our interview with Jason Hibbets, a senior community evangelist in Corporate Marketing at Red Hat where he is a community manager for Opensource.com.
Secretary of Defense Carter is tepid on closing Guantanamo Bay, a historic victory against indefinite solitary confinement at Pelican Bay prison, and a liberal argument for charter schools falls short.
Photographer Ryan Spencer spent about two years watching dozens of disaster movies. As he went he photographed stills from these epic-destruction fests using black and white film and a polaroid land camera.
Listen to our Labor Day Special episode as Lisa Autz hits the streets of NYC to learn about the best and worst jobs out there--everything from Lobster fishing on a boat in Maine to working in Finance and cleaning up nasty burger grease.
It’s back to school season! We finally get to Jelani Cobb’s beautiful New Yorker article on the history of a recently shuttered New York City high school. Also, lots of fun listener mail!
1973. That's fourteen years of prison time after Delpha Wade killed a man who was raping her. She’d wanted to kill the other one too, but he got away. It's hard to find a decent job, but Delpha's persistence pays off. She lands a secretarial job with Tom Phelan, an ex-roughneck turned neophyte private eye. Delpha is smart, prison-wise, and together the two stumble into the dark corners of Beaumont, a blue-collar, Cajun-influenced town dominated by Big Oil. A mysterious client plots mayhem against a small petrochemical company — why? Searching for a teenage boy, Phelan uncovers the weird lair of a serial killer. And Delpha — on a weekend outing — looks into the eyes of her rapist, the one who got away. The novel's conclusion is classic noir, full of surprise, excitement, and karmic justice.
Listen to part 2 of our interview with Eileen Appelbaum, Senior Economist for the Center for Economic and Policy Research, on the overall benefits of fair wage for both employers and employees.
Mike Konczal joins us to discuss the ups and downs of the stock market, Obama’s legacy with Dodd Frank, and the presidential candidates’ economic platforms. Also, John has a funny story he’s wanted to read Molly since yesterday, and listener mail.
Check out our interview with Eileen Appelbaum, Senior Economist for the Center for Economic and Policy Research, on employee turnover costs and the role minimum wage plays in benefitting both employer and employee.
Jeff Abbott joins us to explain the latest protests in Guatemala and the political scandal that preceded them. Also, keeping up with Kanye, and listener mail.
Listen as we speak with people on the streets on NYC about raising the minimum wage to $15/hour.
Hocine Dimerdji joins us to discuss the protests in Beirut and the history and context behind them. Also, John and Molly watched the VMAs and feel 150 years old.
Check out part 2 of our interview with Willy C. Shih, professor of management practice at Harvard Business School's technology and operations management unit.
Yana Kunichoff joins us to discuss the Dyett hunger strike for a public school in Chicago, homelessness amongst NYC’s children surges, and listener mail.
This week we speak with Jane Brown, editor of the new photo book Both Sides of Sunset. The book examines how photographers have documented the geography, landscape, architecture and people of Los Angeles.
Check out our interview with Willy C. Shih, prof. of management practice at Harvard Business School, on the changing landscape of manufacturing and the effects of wage rates.
Ryan Schleeter joins us to talk about the intersection of the environment and social justice, checking in on the migrant crisis in Europe, and homelessness amongst NYC students is at an all time high.
Comedian, writer, and rock aficionado Dave Hill gets his mettle AND metal tested as he and George discuss the soothing power of candles. They also play a game of “Metal Or Made Up” and dissect Black Sabbath album covers.
What if instead of trying to avoid the pain and uncertainty of labor, we asked what we could learn from it? In telling the intimate birth stories of her three children and miscarriage, Julia shows us how giving birth can be one of motherhood’s (and life’s) greatest teachers. Rather than giving advice on how to labor or how to parent, this book consistently offers the message that a woman can grow through the challenges that life presents her and learn to trust herself. For women who share a tendency for “getting it right,” this honest and unguarded memoir is a reminder that the pretense of control is no match for the freedom of letting go.
We speak with Dina Dicenso, owner of a vegan tattoo shop called Gristle, on the entire vegan process in tattooing and more about ethical tattoo ink.
The journalist who Donald Trump kicked out of a press conference was Univision host Jorge Ramos, a horrific shooting in Virginia on live television, and listener mail from great friend of the show Hocine on the protests in Beirut.
Part 2 of our interview with Bruce Klitzman, senior director of Duke's Kenan Plastic Surgery Research Laboratories, about his invention of a new tattoo ink called Freedom-2.
It’s our first show without a guest all month, so John and Molly can catch up on the news. Also, there’s always more listener mail!
We speak with surgeon Bruce Klitzman about his development of a less harmful tattoo ink alternative.
David Banks joins us to discuss the Atlantic’s tired, tired cover story on supposedly coddled college students and why everyone is wrong. Also, catching up on all the news we missed last week, and listener mail.
Listen to part 2 of our interview with Monona Rossol, chemist, artist, and industrial hygienist, on the health hazards of inking up your body.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Coming Clean" and features Mike Kelton, Jim O'Grady, Jo Firestone and Adam Wade.
Justin Tyme joins us to discuss his project “I Wore Lipstick,” which invites people of all genders to share their stories and experiences with makeup. Also, our belated conversation about marking the year since the US started war with ISIS.
Marc Fischer is the administrator of Public Collectors an online archive dedicated to preserving cultural artifacts that don’t get attention from libraries, museums and other collecting institutions. Marc is known for organizing events and exhibitions around the Pubic Collectors archive, but even if you’re stuck behind a computer screen the collection of digital images and PDF scans of weird books and zines is truly one of the gems of the internet. I’ve spent many an hour looking at stuff like photo collections of vandalized cacti, an erotic comic about amputees, and a heart wrenching book of drawings of by atomic bomb survivors.
Listen to Monona Rossol, chemist, artist, and industrial hygienist, speak about the researched dangers of tattoo ink.
Todd Miller joins us to discuss the Republican and Democratic presidential candidates’ immigration policies, as well as the sociopolitical, economic, and environmental reasons for migration. Also, it’s been a year since the war on ISIS began.
He was more than just a cowboy. He was the top male motion picture box-office star, 1933-34-35, as selected by Motion Picture Herald; member, Aviation Hall of Fame, International Polo Hall of Fame, most widely-read syndicated newspaper columnist by 1935; wrote more than 4,000 daily and weekly newspapers columns and dozens of articles for nationally distributed magazines; wrote six books; anchored America's first coast-to-coast radio hookup in 1928; star of highly popular Sunday evening radio program of commentary and entertainment, 1933-1935.
We talk with your average gym-goer and fitness instructors on the effects of soda on the body when working out.
Michelle Chen joins us to discuss how childcare and early childhood education workers are undervalued and underpaid. Also, Netflix workers get selective parental leave, and listener mail.
Part 2 of our interview with Niraj Naik who explains what soda does to the body and healthier alternatives.
Parker Marie Molloy on Caitlyn Jenner, inclusive language around reproductive rights, and what happened with the journalist who wrote the disturbing Dr. V story. Also, a super belated venting about Trump, and listener mail.
We speak with Niraj Naik, former pharmacist and holistic health practitioner, on the pervasive addiction to sugar drinks.
Anna Lekas Miller on the Lebanese diaspora, mixed identity as identity, and the Syrian refugee crisis in Lebanon. Also, Molly is channeling her inner beach bum, and listener mail.
We speak with Anahad O'Connor, NY Times writer on health, diet and nutrition, about his latest article on the details of Coca-Cola's scientific funding.
Sarah Jaffe joins us to discuss why politicians are not our friends, a beautiful Guardian essay on how the victors are the authors of history, and listener mail.
Photographer Meryl Meisler grew up on the South Shore of Long Island, and in the 1970s she began photographing her family, friends and neighbors around her suburban home town. As a photographer, Meryl is drawn to the antics of everyday life, and in her intimate and often hilarious photos we’re treated to scenes like a man juggling cardboard boxes after the prom, her young cousin grimacing at the camera from atop a toilet seat, or an amazing image of a couple smiling to the camera from a bedroom decked out in butterfly print wallpaper and matching bedspread.
We speak with Marion Nestle, expert nutritionist at NYU, on Coca-Cola funding scientists to shift the blame for obesity away from sugary drinks.
Sarah Jeong joins us to discuss her new book The Internet of Garbage, tech, law, and Lenny Kravitz. Also, so much listener mail.
The dazzling Becky Yamamoto visits George to show off her German accent, talk about her award-winning web series, Uninspired, and weigh in on the show's latest sponsor: bacon.
Marvel and a Wonder is a darkly mesmerizing epic and literary page-turner set at the end of the twentieth century. In summer 1995, Jim Falls, a Korean War vet, struggles to raise his sixteen-year-old grandson, Quentin, on a farm in southern Indiana. In July, they receive a mysterious gift—a beautiful quarter horse—which upends the balance of their difficult lives. The horse’s appearance catches the attention of a pair of troubled, meth-dealing brothers and, after a violent altercation, the horse is stolen and sold. Grandfather and grandson must travel the landscape of the bleak heartland to reclaim the animal and to confront the ruthless party that has taken possession of it. Along the way, both will be forced to face the misperceptions and tragedies of their past.
We speak with an environmentalist on the EPA disaster in the Colorado river.
Sarah Leonard joins us to discuss the debt crisis in Greece, why austerity doesn’t work but won’t die, and how Greeks are showing solidarity with one another. Also, listener mail.
We speak with an environmentalist on the recent Gold King Mine defunct that has lead to a massive contamination of the Animas River and Colorado River.
Kambri Crews on her community space in Astoria Queens offering “after-school for grown ups,” This American Life takes on school segregation, and listener mail.
Activists discuss some of the greatest polluted waterways in America.
Emily Schorr Lesnick joins us to discuss diversity in comedy, talking about racism as a white person, and teaching anti-racism to youth. Also, protests in Ferguson on the year anniversary of the killing of Mike Brown, and listener mail.
Part 2 of our interview with Christopher Swain, an activist that has been swimming and advocating for our waterways since 1996.
Josh Eidelson joins us to discuss where unions stand so far in the presidential race, Molly has an essay on sports, of all things, up at the Toast, and de Blasio starts a new effort to address homelessness in New York City.
This week on Art Uncovered I talk with artist Sarah Rothberg. Her virtual reality installation Memory/Place: My House is part of the exhibition Memory Burn, on view now at Bitforms Gallery in New York.
We speak with environmental activist, Christopher Swain, whose been swimming and advocating for our waterways since 1996.
Will Potter joins us to discuss the recent decision ruling Idaho’s AgGag laws unconstitutional, a teacher sues New York State over value added evaluation methods, and Molly watched some of the Kids Table debate before we started recording.
No substance on earth is as hotly debated as marijuana. Opponents claim it’s dangerous, addictive, carcinogenic, and a gateway to serious drug abuse. Fans claim it as a wonder drug, treating cancer, anorexia, AIDS, chronic pain, glaucoma, arthritis, migraines, PTSD, and insomnia. Patients suffering from these conditions need—and deserve—hard facts based on medical evidence, not hysteria and superstition.
Lara Aknin, professor of psychology at Simon Fraser University whose research focuses on generosity, money and happiness.
Melissa Gira Grant joins us to discuss Amnesty’s new recommendations to support the human rights of sex workers, and the celebrity backlash against it. Also, John’s last story from Beirut about art therapy for refugee children, a teacher sues New York State over the teacher evaluation system, and the NYPD releases a video about drugs that isn’t about the drugs it says it was about.
We hear from Peter Stearns, a professor at George Mason University who researches the historical culture of happiness.
Andrea Grimes joins us to discuss attacks on Planned Parenthood and abortion access in Texas and across the country, the NYPD asks a woman who was sexually assaulted if she was a “party girl,” and Peak Chait comes to us in a debate about office air-conditioning.
Learning through positive psychologists the ability to balance work-life and happiness.
Chepe joins us to discuss reform versus revolution, connecting social movement in the United States to movements in other Western countries, and when to be skeptical of police reform. Also, John’s got a new hussle, and listener mail.
We hear part 2 of our interview with Sonja Lyubomirsky on building an architect of sustainable happiness.
Collier Meyerson and Ned Resnikoff join us for the live show.
If you lived in Romania in the 1980s and happened to catch a government sanctioned screening of a foreign film or TV show, your viewing experience would have been much different than someone watching in the West. Anything deemed western was cut: scenes with swimming pools, depictions of too much food, marital infidelity, freedom of religion. Even kisses could only last for three seconds on screen. The 80s were some of the harshest years for communism in Romania and the dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was considered one of the most brutal in the soviet bloc. The secret police kept tight control over all aspects of Romanian life and cinema was no exception.
Dr. Lyubomirsky speaks with us about her research on developing a science of human happiness.
A federal judge says the US can continue to hold an accused Taliban member at Guantanamo, NYC millionaires donate millions for ed reform, and Molly has an announcement.
Only a guest like Jacqueline Novak would have the zest for living that would inspire her to lie, rather than sit, on the Spit Take Comedy couch. Listen as she and George discuss pizza, depression and their hair.
Born out of a global expedition fearlessly undertaken by a young woman, Project Animal Farm offers a riveting and revealing look at what truly happens behind farm doors.
Uber is getting a lot of heat for it's aggressive disregard for the existing yellow cabbies, but how are they treating their own drivers?
Alexis Goldstein on financial regulation, two animal rights activists are charged as terrorists under a terrible 2006 law, Bloomberg still exerts a disturbing amount of influence over NYC schools, and listener mail.
We hear from the New York Taxi Workers Alliance on their strategy to fight Uber.
New York Magazine puts 35 women who have accused Cosby of rape on their cover, the Trump show continues unabated, and the FBI is accelerating their investigations into alleged ISIS sympathizers.
Javaid Tariq, NYC yellow cab driver of more than 20 years, struggles to maintain his only source of income in face of Uber.
Indiana authorities shut down a holographic performance of Chief Keef, Cleveland police pepper spray activists outside a national Black Lives Matter conference, and a principal commits suicide after her schools test scores come under investigation.
Part II with Sarah Lacy focuses on the questionable morals of Uber's culture in impacting the larger culture of Silicon Valley.
Some of the funniest writers in New York are getting together to let you know about the nights of their lives - those nights that stand out a cut above the rest, that left behind stories so full of hilarity and wonder that they're worth sharing. This performance was recorded on August 31, 2011 at the UCB Theater in NYC. Hosted by David Martin Theme: "Scars"
A deputy sheriff’s lies lead to a SWAT raid that injured a baby with a flashbang, NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo's has to reveal his disciplinary history, and listener mail.
This week on Art Uncovered I sit down with artist Eileen Maxson. Her new solo show at Microscope gallery in Bushwick is called I was really gonna be something by the age of twenty-three, and it's a collection of videos, objects, and installation pieces based on the classic 90s film Reality Bites. In our interview we talk about Eileen's experience growing up in Houston, where Reality Bites is set, and how the film's central conflict of corporate culture vs. authentic artistic expression has manifested itself in the 21st century.
Sarah Lacy, founder and editor of PandoDaily, speaks with us about the cautionary culture of Uber as one of Silicon Valley's most successful start-ups.
Jesse Myerson joins us to discuss the reasons why Bernie Sanders should run as a proper Socialist, a white man commits a mass shooting at a theater in Louisianna, and coverage of the death of Sandra Bland continues to veer into the absurd.
What if you woke up with the alarming suspicion that you were being watched?
We hear the ideas of a re-imagined city that cares better for the soil, ecosystem and environment.
Maya Schenwar on Obama's prison visit and mass incarceration, an essay by Lindy West on being a fat bride, and listener mail.
We hear part 2 of our interview with Starhawk, author and permaculture designer and teacher and director at Earth Activist training.
New disturbing video in the Sandra Bland case, state guidelines for how schools should protect trans students, Obama's attempts to close Guantanamo continue to stall, and listener mail.
We hear from Starhawk, author and permaculture designer and teacher and director at Earth Activist training.
A website that facilitates affairs gets hacked, Gen Wesley Clark calls for a new round of internment camps, efforts to desegregate NYC public schools, and new state guidelines for protecting trans students.
Today we hear part 2 of our interview with Claudia Joseph on perma-design techniques and it's importance in an urban space like Brooklyn.
Black Lives Matter protesters interrupt Bernie Sanders and Martin O'Malley at NetRoots, Gawker posts and then retracts a story outing a married man, and listener mail.
Michael Kamber is a veteran photojournalist and founder of the Bronx Documentary Center. His is also co-curator of the BDC's new exhibition Altered Images: 150 Years of Posed and Manipulated Documentary Photography. The show comes at a time when Michael says the photojournalism profession faces a "crisis in credibility," as illustrated by numerous high profile incidents of photographers staging images or manipulating their pictures excessively in photoshop. Just last year judges of the prestigious World Press Photo competition disqualified 20% of their semifinalists for altering their photographs. In this years competition the photographer Giovanni Troilo was disqualified for staging a photo of his cousin and his girlfriend having sex in a car.
Founder and Director of New York Permaculture Exchange, Claudia Joseph, talks with us about permaculture and sustainable living.
Early thoughts on the shooting at two military offices in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Angela Merkel makes a Palestinian girl cry, and David Brooks would like you to shut up and believe in the American Dream.
The fashionably bespectacled and hilarious Luke Thayer swings through the Spit Take Comedy studios to chat with George and use the bathroom. They discuss how to manipulate Siri, CVS customer service, and whether George is a racist or not. He assures you, he’s not.
For more than 25 years, Uncle John’s Bathroom Reader has helped readers amazing things they didn’t know (and amazing things you didn’t know you didn’t know). Now, Uncle John’s tackles one of the world’s best loved and — fastest growing interests — beer.
The discussion gets into the complex cultural tensions in the neighborhood of Brooklyn and importance of public debate.
Ryan Devereaux joins us to discuss the escape of drug kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, Molly's new piece about Fun, and Caitlyn Jenner's amazing speech at the ESPYs.
We hear part 2 of our interview with Olasov on elevating civic conversation in Brooklyn with Brooklyn Public Philosophy.
Katie Klabusich joins us to discuss the efforts to affirmatively protect abortion rights, a doctored video of Planned Parenthood causes a manufactured scandal, and Julia Carrie Wong tweets other on-demand economy information at us.
We speak with Ian Olasov, the founder of Brooklyn Public Philosophy, on bridging academia and public philosophy.
Ali Gharib joins us to discuss the historic Iran nuclear deal, the US military takes steps to allow trans people to serve openly, and a new report finds the American Psychological Association was complicit is facilitating torture during the Bush administration.
Part two of our interview with Jonah Minkoff-Zern brings to light the realities that public debate has in terms of bringing ideas and opposing views into attention.
Frontline's Edward Watts joins us to discuss his new documentary Escaping ISIS, the American Federation of Teachers endorses Hillary Clinton, and a new deal for Greece looks worse than ever.
Artist Danielle DeJesus was born and raised in Bushwick. About ten years ago, when she was in high school, she realized her neighborhood starting to change, starting to gentrify. She noticed "bodegas turning into swanky bars, supermarkets blaring english rock music instead of salsa", and her mom was getting calls from landlords offering her cash to move out of her apartment.
We speak with Jonah Minkoff-Zern, co-director of Public Citizen’s Democracy Is for People campaign.
Above-board weed delivery comes to California, Greece takes steps toward austerity, debating Hillary Clinton's brand of feminism, and listener mail.
Twenty-one-year-old Lizzie Adler had everything a young woman could want: she was beautiful, bright, and had both a faithful best friend and a handsome boyfriend with whom she was deeply in love. In one fell swoop; calamity strikes, stripping Lizzie of all that she holds dear. While driving with her best friend, Nan, en route to a party, Lizzie collides with another car.
Part two of our interview with the host of Shanghai Mermaids in NYC leads to a discussion on the reflective enjoyment of celebrating an era of the past.
Jeff Sharlet on a police killing on Skid Row in LA, FBI director Jim Comey testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee, and the great Glitch of July 2015.
We speak with a woman who has managed to host extravagant, underground parties throughout NYC.
New York City will offer non-bail options for non-violent offenses rather than sending every arrestee to Rikers, released documents show Cosby admits to drugging women, additional thoughts on Greece, and listener tweets.
We speak with an 81 year-old yoga instructor who has been flexing her limbs for years to retain youth.
Parents share their experiences with Success Academy, US law enforcement agencies have a shady relationship with a spyware company called Hacking Team, and listener mail.
Part two of our interview with Isabel Allende gives us a perspective in how attitude and health have the greatest impact on passionate living at older age.
Greek voters reject austerity in weekend referendum, the ed reform origins of stressing grit and perseverance in classrooms, and Maria from Sesame Street leaves the show.
In Japan 3/11 refers to the earthquake, tsunami and meltdown off the Fukishima nuclear power plant that occurred on March 11th 2011. That day the deadly tsunami wave killed more than 15000 people and radiation from the nuclear plant has left large swaths of land uninhabitable to this day. In The Wake explores how Japanese photographers have addressed the large scale death and distruction, as well as the impact it's had on the Japanese psyche. The images in the show range from annonymouse family photographs, to images that speak to Japan's complex history with nuclear energy.
We speak with Isabel Allende, a Chilean writer who has given speeches about living more passionate lives as people age.
The UK government has admitted to spying on Amnesty International, less weigh on standardized tests meaning more students passing to the next grade, and listener mail.
Comedian Abbi Crutchfield takes a break from her hosting gig at People Now to fill George in on her favorite celebrity encounters, tweeting strategies, and how she shows R-E-S-P-E-C-T to the great Aretha Franklin.
Before he collided with a limousine, Gabriel, an Anna’s hummingbird with a head and throat cloaked in iridescent magenta feathers, could spiral 130 feet in the air, dive 60 miles per hour in a courtship display, hover, and fly backward. When he arrived in rehab caked in road grime, he was so badly injured that he could barely perch. But Terry Masear, one of the busiest hummingbird rehabbers in the country, was determined to save this damaged bird, who seemed oddly familiar. During the four months that Terry worked with Gabriel, she took in 160 hummingbirds, from a miniature nestling rescued by a bulldog and a fledgling trapped inside a skydiving wind tunnel at Universal CityWalk, to Pepper, a female Anna’s injured on a film set. In their time together, Pepper and Gabriel form a special bond and, together, with Terry’s help, learn to fly again. Woven around Gabriel and Pepper’s stories are those of other colorful birds in this personal narrative filled with the science and magic surrounding these fascinating creatures.
We speak with Matt Schultz, founder of the Generator, a manufacturing hub for artists and large-scale architecture.
JW Mason joins us to discuss the on-going financial chaos in Greece, the fight for marriage equality for people with disabilities is far from won, and listener mail.
We are looking into Part 2 of our interview with Steven Barrison about the specific policy work being made to support local job growth.
The US remains vague on the status of a detained ISIS widow, Cuomo and de Blasio trade barbs over control of city policy, and listener mail.
We talk with the Small Business Congress on how they are working to develop more domestic jobs in New York City.
The Supreme Court rules that unreliable drugs can still be used to execute death row inmates, data mining children, returning to CNN's ISIS dildo story, and listener mail.
Today we continue our conversation with Willy Shih on the paradigm shift of US manufacturing into highly technical production.
Frontline's Karen O'Connor joins us to discuss her new documentary Growing Up Trans, two New York Times columnists write regrettable columns, and CNN's ISIS/dildo story is too hilarious for words.
This week on the show, artist Jessamyn Lovell talks about photography, surveillance and what it was like tracking down the woman who stole her identity. Jessamyn's work is currently on view at CENTER in Santa Fe and SCA Contemporary in Albuquerque. Her new book, in which she chronicles her efforts to find her identity thief, is available now from SF Camerawork.
We will be speaking with Harvard professor, Willy Shih on his perspective and skepticism in the urge to bring manufacturing back home.
Moira Meltzer-Cohen and William Eric Waters of Just Info join us to discuss how they're providing legal information to communities most likely to be targeted by the criminal justice system.
Cam Scott resents his mother for uprooting him from his home in Ottawa and relocating to Vientiane, Laos, and is determined to never let her forget it. Over time he adjusts to the land and culture, but just as he has found friendship and love, tragedy strikes and he is at the mercy of a stranger to clear his name for a crime he didn't commit.
Today we wrap up the week understanding the instability Puerto Rico faces throughout these challenges.
Today we wrap up the week understanding the instability Puerto Rico faces throughout these challenges.
The ACLU argues for more drone memos before the appeals court in lower Manhattan, Obama backs off his promise to move the drone program from the CIA to the military, and listener mail.
We look at the crippling dependence of Puerto Rico on US currency and goods.
We look at the crippling dependence of Puerto Rico on US currency and goods.
Collier Meyerson joins us to discuss her reporting from Charleston, Gov Andrew Cuomo fails to raise the age in New York, and listener mail.
Today on we hear about the history of US colonization and why freeing Oscar Rivera is so monumental.
Today on we hear about the history of US colonization and why freeing Oscar Rivera is so monumental.
South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley calls for state legislators to bring down the Confederate flag, Obama's interview on Marc Maron's podcast breaks the media, and listener mail.
Today we hear stories of Puerto Rican war veterans fighting for the US without representation.
Today we hear stories of Puerto Rican war veterans fighting for the US without representation.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Money" and features Ophira Eisenberg, Jim O'Grady, Catie Lazarus and Peter Aguero.
Frontline's Andres Cediel joins us to discuss his documentary Rape on the Night Shift, catching up on the shooting in Charleston, and listener mail.
Carla Gannis, The Garden of Emoji Delights, 2015 This week on the show, Brooklyn multi-media artist Carla Gannis talks about some of her new projects. One is an interpretation of Heronimous Bosch's 16th century painting The Garden of Earthly Delights made with emojis. The piece is on view at the Hudson River Museum. The second project is a series of self portraits that Carla calls "selfie drawings." In our interview we touch on the language of emojis, the "gothic internet", the singularity, and growing up in Appalachia. Hieronymus Bosch, Garden of Earthly Delights, circa 1450–1516 Selfie Drawing 33 “Dreaming the Singularity” Selfie Drawing 24 “AKIN” Playlist 00:00 Intro 00:50 Carla Gannis 03:10 Emoji Delights 06:40 Transcription 12:01 Discrete Emoji 13:31 Selfie Drawings 17:47 Singularity 21:45 Appalachia 24:35 Making Art 26:26 The Future 33:03 Finish
Today on we hear from protesters in front the UN asking for the release of Oscar Rivera and the independence of Puerto Rico.
Today on we hear from protesters in front the UN asking for the release of Oscar Rivera and the independence of Puerto Rico.
Julia Carrie Wong joins us to discuss the on-demand economy, a report from Amnesty International finds that not a single US state complies with international law regarding police using deadly force, and listener mail.
Shalewa Sharpe drops in at Spit Take Comedy to talk about 90's slang, record store sexism, and recording her new live album. Things take a real turn for the saucy, though, when she reviews the best emoji stand-ins available for genitalia in a fun round of "Sext or Text."
In this powerful debut novel, three American soldiers haunted by their actions in Afghanistan, search for absolution and human connection in family and civilian life. Wintric Ellis joins the Army as soon as he graduates from high school, saying goodbye to his girlfriend, Kristen, and to the backwoods California town whose borders have always been the limits of their horizon. Deployed in Afghanistan two years into a directionless war, he struggles to find his bearings in a place where allies could, at any second, turn out to be foes. Two seasoned soldiers, Dax and Torres, take Wintric under their wing.
Today we finish our week-long investigation into fracking with a conversation with Dr. Ingraffea about a greener tomorrow.
The top AQAP commander is killed in a US air strike, Israel's weird video criticizing foreign media's coverage of Gaza, and listener mail.
We hear from Dr. Anthony Ingraffea, a civil and environmental engineer who examines the environmental detriment of shale rock drilling.
Ned Resnikoff joins us to discuss class war in Iceland, the relative danger of right-wing terrorism compared with Islamic terrorism, and listener mail.
Today we get an inside perspective of worker conditions and safety on oil rigs and fracking sites.
More on Rachel Dolezal, and listener mail on the history of the word gender and deadname.
We end on a discussion about how the EPA and other oil companies are working to undermine the hazardous effects.
David Banks on Reddit banning a disparaging subreddit, and thoughts on Rachel Dolezal.
Sharon Shattuck's father came out as transgender and changed her name to Trisha when Sharon was in middle school. As a kid just wanting to fit in in a small mid-western community, adjusting and understanding Trisha's new identity proved difficult. It was also hard for Sharon's straight-identified mother Marcia. In Sharon's new documentary From This Day Forward she sets out to create a portrait of Trisha and to understand how her parents marriage endured such radical change.
Today we look into the work of NYPIRG in helping to ban fracking in New York State.
We devote the hour to listener mail. That's it. Nothing but listener mail.
Allan Ageman is a highly dedicated and ethical professional leader with the ability to quickly and effectively implement solutions to the long term and day-to-day business challenges that are a constant in the staffing business. Allan Ageman firmly believes that he could not have achieved all of this without a great partner, Richard Bachrach, and an outstanding management team and staff that share the same vision as he does.
Today on the Daily Beat we wrap it up learning about the humanitarian art of journalism and it's ability to build a community.
Cora Currier joins us to discuss the powerful friends of David Petraeus, initial thoughts on the case of Usaama Rahim, the importance of playing for kindergarteners, and listener mail.
Today on the Daily Beat we continue to discuss the benefits and disadvantages of freelance work and the importance of civic journalism.
FBI intrusion into defense teams at Guantanamo further delays the 9/11 trial, an education reform spokesperson says testing is important for property values, and a teacher test in NY is deemed racist.
Today on the Daily Beat, we discuss some of the blurred boundaries of journalism in the technological age.
Mychal Denzel Smith joins us to discuss a recent video of Dallas police assaulting black teenagers at a pool party, and a young man held at Rikers for 3 years prior to trial has committed suicide.
Today on the Daily Beat Molly Knefel discusses her work in writing about the US juvenile justice system and how to use new media to help fuel research.
Mychal Denzel Smith joins us to discuss a recent video of Dallas police assaulting black teenagers at a pool party, and a young man held at Rikers for 3 years prior to trial has committed suicide.
In his book, Disappearance of Darkness: Photography at the End of the Analog Age, Robert Burley documents the infrastructure that for nearly 100 years supported film photography. Robert was granted access to shuddered film factories to photograph the massive machines and interior spaces where thousands of workers once made film in total darkness. He visited Dwanye's photo lab in Kansas: the last photo lab in the world to process Kodak's iconic Kodachrome film. And, for the most dramatic pictures in the book, Robert photographed the demolitions of film manufacturing buildings at Kodak's headquarters in Rochester New York.
On today's episode, we dissect some of the in-depth reporting that has beat the odds by the day's journalistic standards.
It's the two year anniversary of the Edward Snowden revelations, a ridiculous New York Times debate on whether police accountability has increased crime, and listener mail.
The sharply dressed and sharp witted Colin Burgess pays a visit to Spit Take Comedy to chat with George about his unusually tiny baby and what he is and isn't willing to put on his pee pee. Things really get rowdy when a forced argument breaks out, though all ends well.
Today he is the inspiration for fiction adaptations, blockbuster movies, hit television shows, raucous Twitter banter, and thriving subcultures. More than a century after Sherlock Holmes first capered into our world, what is it about Arthur Conan Doyle’s peculiar creation that continues to fascinate us? Journalist and lifelong Sherlock fan Zach Dundas set out to find the answer.
Today's break down: We wrap up our week-long discussion with Steven Weinberg on the future of the evolving modern scientific method.
Faiza Patel joins us to discuss the recently approved NSA reform known as the Freedom Act, class trumps ability when it comes to graduation rates, and listener mail.
Today's break down: We hear about the complicated interplay of science and religion during the scientific revolution by physicist, Steven Weinberg.
Mike Konczal joins us to discuss the war on higher education and the new rules for the economy, the USA Freedom Act becomes law, and listener mail.
Today's break down: We learn about the scientific methods of the golden age of Alexandria compared with New York City.
Dave Zirin joins us to discuss the ongoing FIFA scandal and the reelection of Sepp Blatter, Molly's latest story on how Obama's police plan effects schools, and listener mail.
Today's break down: Steven Weinberg speaks about some of the greatest ideas we had to "unlearn" in order to develop the modern science we know today.
Murtaza Hussain of The Intercept and Danny Gold of Vice join us for our latest Radio Dispatch Live, in which we talk about the war in Syria, the rise of ISIS, and the role of the US in both.
My guest this week is Antwerp-based photographer Jan Kempenaers. Jan broke out on the photography scene in 2010 when he published a book called Spomenik. The book documents the giant geometric sculptures that were built across the countryside of the former Yugoslavia in the 60s and 70 as monuments to various sites and battles from World War Two. Jan traveled to these isolated sites to photograph these alien-looking sculptures. Before Jan's project these monuments were largely unknown except to the people in the small towns where they're located.
Today's break down: Steven Weinberg begins us on a the journey of human scientific thought with the pre-socratic era of the scientific hypothesis.
Jamil Smith joins us to discuss the rampant police abuse in Ohio, going beyond the simplistic reactions to trigger warnings, and listener mail.
Before his life went totally off the rails, Patrick O’Neil was living the punk rock dream, working at San Francisco’s legendary Mabuhay Gardens, going on to become a roadie and then the road manager for such seminal bands as Dead Kennedys, Flipper, Subhumans, and T.S.O.L. But that was before his heroin addiction veered totally out of control. A junkie for eighteen years, O’Neil, the educated son of intellectuals, eventually turned to a life of crime, ending up the ringleader of a group of armed bank robbers, all in an increasingly out-of-control attempt to keep himself and his girlfriend in drugs. Now, after a stint in prison and fourteen years clean off drugs, O’Neil takes a look back at the experiences—moving, calamitous, and at times both hilarious and terrifying—that led to his downfall and recovery. Told in sparse prose and graphic detail, GUN, NEEDLE, SPOON examines the long road to redemption, and the obstacles along the way, demystifying the “criminal life” so often depicted in film and fiction, but seldom written about from the first-hand point of view of those who have lived it.
Today's break down: Listen in to Sara Chipps, developer and entrepreneur creating interactive jewelry with LED lights and helps high schools program drones.
Jason Leopold joins us to discuss his latest stories on the CIA's internal torture report, Molly trolls herself with some exciting new thought-leaders, we finally deliver on the crap cannon, and listener mail.
Today's break down: We hear from women CEOs on starting their own tech and media companies despite obstacles.
John's latest story from Beirut on the LGBT Syrian refugees who often wait months or years for asylum in a third country, Cleveland police will no longer taser people's genitals at will, and listener mail.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are checking out all things digital and tech at The Internet Week Festival.
John's first major story from Beirut examines the crisis of Syrians born in Lebanon without proper identification and the risks that statelessness carries, Ohio cop Michael Brelo is found not guilty after police shot and kill two unarmed African Americans, and listener mail.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are checking out all things digital and tech at The Internet Week Festival.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Passion" and features Mike Kelton, Danny Artese, Laura Willcox and Adam Wade.
Frontline's Martin Smith joins us to discuss his new documentary on the Obama administration's response to the Syrian civil war, the NYT's decision to name CIA agents, and listener mail.
When photographer Patrick Gookin moved to Los Angeles he found himself spending a lot of time in the car. Driving to work he began to notice how strange and out of place the pedestrians looked. Often alone, these figures seemed totally enveloped by an urban environment designed primarily for motorists.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are checking out all things digital and tech at The Internet Week Festival.
Alexis Goldstein joins us to discuss the negotiated plea deal that will keep individual bankers out of jail despite admitting to felonies, the six cops involved in Freddie Gray's killing have been indicted, and listener mail.
The charming comedian and writer Alison Leiby swings by the Spit Take Comedy studio to discuss her self-help parody books, cooking shows, and how to train your child to kill you.
Why would we ever want to prohibit literature from young people? Rather than banning books and the written word in our schools and libraries across the country, wouldn’t we be better off to share controversial text and teach students how to read and think critically instead? Today on Book Talk we look at why books are blacklisted by the American Library Association; which books have been or are currently banned; and what we should do about it.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at New York's next healthcare revolution with technology, digitization and affordability.
Jeff Abbott joins us to discuss protest and corruption in Guatemala, five international banks plead guilty to felonies for rigging currency markets, and the president of Columbia doesn't shake Emma Sulkowicz's hand at graduation.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at New York's next healthcare revolution with technology, digitization and affordability.
The increasingly revised history of the build up to the war on Iraq, restorative justice in NYC schools, and listener mail about creeping Sharia.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at New York's next healthcare revolution with technology, digitization and affordability.
Obama plans to limit transfer of some military weapons to local police departments, belated thoughts on the Tsarnaev death penalty sentence, and climate change is going to kill us all.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at New York's next healthcare revolution with technology, digitization and affordability.
Frontline's Michael Kirk joins us to discuss his new documentary on secrecy and torture, ISIS captures a key city in Iraq days after a US raid in Syria, and Obama will limit transfer of some military weapons to local police departments.
Jonathan Monaghan makes short films that combine high end computer animation, with surreal and fantastical scenes drawn from religious themes, popular culture and history. In one of his pieces we watch a polar bear that resembles one of those from the popular coca-cola ad campaign, slowly staggering around in a shapeless black space, only to realize after three minutes, that we've been watching the bear as it slowly dies. Another piece, which Jonathan discusses on the show, features a lion, a black eagle, some medical devices, and a beheading. His piece Escape Pod was shown as part of a solo show at Bitforms Gallery here in New York.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at New York's next healthcare revolution with technology, digitization and affordability.
Families respond to Hillary Clinton's criticism of mass incarceration, Jeb Bush waffles on Iraq war, and Marco Rubio loves Taken.
Through historical data, typewritten letters, chapter challenges and personal accounts, The Joy of Missing Out, leads us on a unique exploration of the modern world, revealing how present-ness, intentionality and limited connections are the keys to our joy.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at violence and the city and investigating the nature and effects of various types of urban warfare.
Thoughts on Sy Hersh's blockbuster account of the untold story of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden, a tech castle is the new epitome of ridiculousness, and listener mail.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at violence and the city and investigating the nature and effects of various types of urban warfare.
John is back from Beirut, and listener mail.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at violence and the city and investigating the nature and effects of various types of urban warfare.
Page May joins us to discuss the Chicago Torture reparations package, Melissa Gira Grant joins us to discuss the labor side of the Times' nail salon story, and Molly eagerly awaits John's return home.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We are looking at violence and the city and investigating the nature and effects of various types of urban warfare.
David E. Hoffman joins us to discuss Fronline's upcoming documentary “The Trouble with Chicken.” Also, a listener joins us to discuss crowd funding top surgery, and the New York Times nail salon story has already lead the state to intervene.
In the 1960s singer Ros Serey Sothea was one of the biggest stars in Cambodia. In those days the capital Phnom Penh was the hub of a buzzing music scene, full of musicians who, like Ros Serey Sothea were combining traditional Cambodian sounds and themes with western rock and roll. There were surf bands, crooners, garage, punk and psych acts --- all with a distinctly Cambodian character. As the scene grew through the 60s and into the 70s numerous bands clubs and record labels sprung up to meet the demand for new music. In fact, music was such a big part of Cambodian life that even the country's leader Norodom Sihanouk, was an accomplished singer and performer.
This week theme on the Daily Beat we are looking at violence and the city--investigating the nature and effects of various types of urban warfare.
John joins us from Beirut to discuss his visit to an art therapy program for teen refugees, the New York Times exposes the horrific costs of the mani/pedi industry, Molly is channeling Christian Slater, and listener mail.
George invites funny dude and overall great guy Jason Saenz to Spit Take Comedy to show off his new desk and classic talk show moves. The hordes of teen girls in the studio audience thrill over Jason as he plays a game of "Would You Get High?" and discusses his ever clever Saenz Signs.
The Turners have lived on Yarrow Street for over fifty years. Their house has seen thirteen children grown and gone—and some returned; it has seen the arrival of grandchildren, the fall of Detroit’s East Side, the loss of a father.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We take a look at the FOMO phenomenon from people on the streets as well as experts in the fields of psychology and technology.
Katharine Heller joins us for an impromptu Friday Funday to discuss bartending, storytelling, and New York's most notorious standardized tests. Also, rethinking “The Wire” after Baltimore's uprising, and listener mail.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We take a look at the FOMO phenomenon from people on the streets as well as experts in the fields of psychology and technology.
Ryan Devereaux joins us to discuss his two part story on 43 disappeared students in Mexico, and John skypes from Beirut after visiting a refugee camp near the Syrian border.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We take a look at the FOMO phenomenon from people on the streets as well as experts in the fields of psychology and technology.
Ben Ramos joins us to discuss Puerto Rican political prisoner Oscar Lopez Rivera, John Oliver covers standardized testing better than most major newspapers, and listener mail.
This week theme on the Daily Beat: We take a look at the FOMO phenomenon from people on the streets as well as experts in the fields of psychology and technology.
Dan Edge joins us to discuss his new Frontline documentary Outbreak about the Ebola crisis, John skypes in from Beruit, and the 6 officers involved in Freddie Gray's death have been indicted in Baltimore.
Artist Tuur Van Balen is interested in the grey areas between art and science, biology and technology, mass production and the natural world.
This week on the Daily Beat we take a look at the FOMO phenomenon from people on the streets as well as experts in the fields of psychology and technology.
Bill de Blasio tells New York protesters to listen to the police, the second prisoner in the Freddie Gray van speaks out, David Brooks' getting worse is like a perpetual motion machine, and listener mail.
We struggle to manage complexity every day. We follow intricate diets to lose weight, juggle multiple remotes to operate our home entertainment systems, face proliferating data at the office, and hack through thickets of regulation at tax time. But complexity isn't destiny. Sull and Eisenhardt argue there's a better way: By developing a few simple yet effective rules, you can tackle even the most complex problems.
 
Simple Rules are a hands-on tool to achieve some of our most pressing personal and professional objectives, from overcoming insomnia to becoming a better manager or a smarter investor. Simple Rules can help solve some of our most urgent social challenges from setting interest rates at the Federal Reserve to protecting endangered marine wildlife along California’s coast. 
This week on the Daily Beat we take a look at the breakthrough investigations from across the globe on political corruption.
New York City takes to the streets in solidarity with Baltimore, Baltimore police claim that Freddie Gray injured himself, and we're joined by Jesse Myerson to discuss it all.
This week on the Daily Beat we take a look at the breakthrough investigations from across the globe on political corruption.
Bryce Covert and Sarah Jaffe join us for our live show to discuss the fight for a living wage, the uprisings in Baltimore and Ferguson, and what Nixon had to say about a universal basic income.
This week on the Daily Beat we take a look at the breakthrough investigations from across the globe on political corruption.
Residents of Baltimore take to the streets to protest the police killing of Freddie Gray, and Molly's new story on how incarcerated youth are denied an education.
This week on the Daily Beat we take a look at the breakthrough investigations from across the globe on political corruption.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Delusions" and features Anna Roisman, Laura Willcox, Josh Sharp and Adam Wade.
Parker Molloy joins us to discuss Diane Sawyer's interview with Bruce Jenner, protests continue in Baltimore following the death of Freddie Gray, and a US drone strike kills two Western hostages held by Al Qaeda.
Photographer Tessa Traeger has been using a trove of victorian glass negatives to create her new project The Chemistry of light. For the project she rephotographed these old plate negatives as still lives using natural light and mirrors to highlight the dramatic forms of chemical decay that have transformed the negatives over their hundred plus years in storage. The result are ghostly, dreamlike views of Victorian England. Some photographs in the project show everyday scenes like a crowd at the beach. Other images are abstractions in which the negative's curled or damaged emulation creates a rainbow of color and folds of texture that nearly obscure the photograph's subject. According to Tessa, the Chemistry of Light project is also about photography itself. She says that as chemical processes give way to digital technology, her collection of damaged and decaying photographs serve as a metaphor for the death of analog photography as a medium.
This week on the Daily Beat we take a look at the breakthrough investigations from across the globe on political corruption.
Jesse Myerson joins us to discuss how to cope when liberals get angry about protests inconveniencing them, Saudi halts and then resumes its bombing of Yemen, and listener mail.
The hilarious Nick Naney drops by and helps instigate the filthiest installment of Spit Take Comedy yet! Nothing is off limits as Nick discusses the time he guest-hosted the Naked Comedy Show at NYC comedy hotspot The Creek and the Cave, as well as unfortunate offers of oral sex and so-called “sperm parties” -- all with equal enthusiasm and insight. Nick also gives heartfelt advice to President Obama and others in a segment we call "Just In The Nick of Time."
Wakefield spent years living in squatted buildings in Europe and New York and brings firsthand knowledge to Sid’s story: How urban homesteaders lived without plumbing or electricity, how they managed their semi-legal status, and what they cared about and fought for. With Sid, Wakefield has created a character who belongs to that world and is also entirely relatable. Sid is a resourceful, intrepid young woman with a wry sense of humor; she’s great company on our journey into the lost world of New York City’s recent past.
This week on the Daily Beat we look at Tribeca Film Institute's Interactive Summit for 2015 and the immersive, new approaches to storytelling.
Germany's role at the center of the US drone campaigns, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat we look at Tribeca Film Institute's Interactive Summit for 2015 and the immersive, new approaches to storytelling.
Gideon Oliver joins us to discuss policing in de Blasio's New York, Jonathan Chait has no idea how charter schools work, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat we look at Tribeca Film Institute's Interactive Summit for 2015 and the immersive, new approaches to storytelling.
Melissa Gira Grant joins us to discuss how a tech start up appears to be helping cops investigate sex workers, the cop who shot Rekia Boyd is found not guilty, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat we look at Tribeca Film Institute's Interactive Summit for 2015 and the immersive, new approaches to storytelling.
The US State Department approves a one billion dollar arms sale to Pakistan, examining a study that finds black and Latino students have lower rated teachers, and listener mail.
Julia Haslett is the director of the documentary An Encounter with Simone Weil. The film tells the story of French Philosopher and activist Simone Weil, who spent her short yet prolific life grappling with a single question: What response does seeing human suffering demand of us? Before making this film Julia had never hear of Simone Weil, but she was familiar with this question. She grew up watching her father struggle with depression, and when Julia was 17 he took his own life. The suicide left her acutely sensitive to people in pain, but it was many years later that Julia read these words that would lead her to make her latest film. This week I speak with Julia Haslett about the life of Simone Weil and how the philosopher inspired this personal documentary.
This week on the Daily Beat we look at Tribeca Film Institute's Interactive Summit for 2015 and the immersive, new approaches to storytelling.
NY Mag asks what is the Bronx, diversity in media matters for a whole host of reasons, and US officials have begun describing the Saudi-led bombing of Yemen as a disaster.
It’s Care Week here at BreakThru Radio and today on Book Talk I will draw a connection between the generations of change that have fought to shift the focus away from the well-oiled machine of post-war American society to the Millennial driving force behind American innovation, growth, and global leadership.
This week on the Daily Beat we look into NYC's vanishing local, small businesses and the action taking to save them.
Officials from Iraq and Saudi Arabia spar over the bombing of Yemen, protests nationwide on fight for 15 and Black Lives Matter, and a listener blog keeping Pride queer.
This week on the Daily Beat we look into NYC's vanishing local, small businesses and the action taking to save them.
The new AUMF has died in Congress, thoughts on public shaming, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat we look into NYC's vanishing local, small businesses and the action taking to save them.
Four former Blackwater contractors are sentenced to lengthy prison terms, and listener mail about our ethics in media debate.
This week on the Daily Beat we look into NYC's vanishing local, small businesses and the action taking to save them.
The Staten Island DA's office continues to mess with the man who filmed Eric Garner's death, an Oklahoma reserve deputy shoots and kills a black man, and listener mail about accents.
This week on the show, I talk with Brooklyn-based artist Sara Marie Miller. Sara works primarily in printmaking and her work explores the connections between perception and the subconscious as well as the tensions between figurative and abstract forms. When I visited Sara Marie's studio last week, we talked about her printing process, "blind contour drawing," alternate realties, and her experience translating a psychic reading into a new work.
This week on the Daily Beat we look into NYC's vanishing local, small businesses and the action taking to save them.
Analyzing media coverage of the shooting of Walter Scott, and the practice of listing the criminal history of black victims of police violence.
The delightful Sue Smith pays a visit to the new Spit Take Comedy headquarters to discuss how she gets through bleak winters and her aversion to crowd work. Of course they dig into some death talk, as well as play a game of "Tatt-oops!" in which Sue has to decide which real tattoos are the most regrettable!
Tommy Wallach - We All Looked Up
This week on the Daily Beat we learn about the rally taking place across the country to shine light on corrupt money in politics.
Micah Uetricht joins us to discuss Rahm Emanuel's reelection as Chicago mayor, Dzhokar Tsarnaev is found guilty on all 30 counts in the Boston Marathon bombing trial, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat we learn about the rally taking place across the country to shine light on corrupt money in politics.
A white police officer is facing murder charges after shooting and killing an unarmed black man and falsifying his report on the incident, the US is accelerating weapons shipments to Saudi Arabia, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat we learn about the rally taking place across the country to shine light on corrupt money in politics.
Sarah Macaraeg joins us to discuss her report on Chicago cops mischaracterizing police-involved fatal shootings, a horrifying close look at Success Academy in the NYT, and thoughts on the report on the Rolling Stone UVA story.
This week on the Daily Beat we learn about the rally taking place across the country to shine light on corrupt money in politics.
Safa al Ahmad joins us to discuss her documentary on the Houthi movement in Yemen and the continuing political unrest, John Oliver interviews Edward Snowden, and listener mail.
San Francisco based photographer Jin Zhu's project Endless Stream looks at California's Central Valley. Jin has been documenting the ways that water --- and lack of it --- transforms the landscape and the ways that humans live on the land.
This week on the Daily Beat we learn about the rally taking place across the country to shine light on corrupt money in politics.
Flint Taylor joins us to discuss the history of Chicago Police abuses, the US and Iran reach a preliminary nuclear deal, al Shabab kills 147 students in Kenya, and listener mail.
Our first book is titled, Food Truck Road Trip: A Cookbook, published by Page Street Publishing (distributed by Macmillan). It features over 100 authentic recipes, stories, and photos from 63 amazing street food vendors in 12 cities across the country. From American comfort food, to Asian and Latin American foods, to vegetarian, and even homemade dessert pops, you’re sure to find something for everyone.
This week on the Daily Beat we are looking at the tenure debate in our education system: Is it unconstitutional or not?
The increasing criminalization of people who can get pregnant, US-backed Saudi strikes in Yemen may amount to violations of the laws of war, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat we are looking at the tenure debate in our education system: Is it unconstitutional or not?
Lynne Rosenberg joins us to discuss horrible casting notices, the continuing controversy over Trevor Noah, and an NPR-hosted debate about the president's powers leaves John frustrated.
This week on the Daily Beat we are looking at the tenure debate in our education system: Is it unconstitutional or not?
Jeff Abbott joins us to discuss the environmental impacts of the TPP, New York State will not tax the purchase of private planes, and Saudi-led airstrikes kill 40 civilians in a refugee camp in Yemen.
This week on the Daily Beat we are looking at the tenure debate in our education system: Is it unconstitutional or not?
The worst parts of Gov Cuomo's school budget have been deflected or delayed, how to respond to the Indiana law that could permit discriminating against gay people, and listener mail.
Amy Franceschini is an artist and one of the founders of Future Farmers, an collective of artists, designers, architects, and thinkers who share an interest in places and how we live in them today. Future Farmers projects come in many shapes and sizes from museum exhibitions, site specific installations, community projects, books, videos, you name it. Running through all this work is an interest in things like land use, agriculture, food traditions, pollution and development and how all these things impact communities.
This week on the Daily Beat we are looking at the tenure debate in our education system: Is it unconstitutional or not?
Sarah Jaffe joins us to discuss the differences between politics and feelings, Yemen draws ever closer to a proxy war, and listener mail.
Comedian Matt Ruby pays a visit to the Spit Take Comedy lair to discuss his transition from the music world to the comedy world, as well as to fill George in on what it was like to grow up with two parents who had opposing lifestyles. Also, in a new installment of “Topical Topics.” both Matt and George rip the Grammys a new one.
Dr. Scott Sampson - How To Raise A Wild Child: The Art and Science of Falling in Love with Nature
This week on the Daily Beat, in honor of Women's History Month, we will be looking at global feminization and gender equality in the workforce.
Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl will be charged with desertion by the US military, a sportswriter with a history of domestic abuse is hired by a San Francisco paper, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat, in honor of Women's History Month, we will be looking at global feminization and gender equality in the workforce.
An outrageous Hollywood magazine questions whether too many actors of color are getting cast, David Brooks' not so subtle war mongering against Iran, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat, in honor of Women's History Month, we will be looking at global feminization and gender equality in the workforce.
Pardiss Kebriaei joins us to discuss her story on two Guantanamo detainee's lives after leaving the prison, the FBI is up to the same old entrapment tactics, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat, in honor of Women's History Month, we will be looking at global feminization and gender equality in the workforce.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Luck" and features Jim O'Grady, Sharon Spell, Peter Aguero, and Adam Wade.
The US pulls all its people out of Yemen as the security situation deteriorates, the Jinx is a totally wild documentary, and listener mail about tombstones.
Jill Bugajski and John Paul Murphy are the curators of the exhibition The Left Front: Radical Art in the Red Decade 1929 to 1940, on view now at New York University's Grey Art Gallery. The show looks how American leftist artists responded to the chaotic and uncertain decade between the beginning of the great depression and the start of World War II.
This week on the Daily Beat, in honor of Women's History Month, we will be looking at global feminization and gender equality in the workforce.
Bill de Blasio unveils a new plan to subject NYC schools to the controversial compstat program, and David Petraeus continues to promote the myth of the surge.
There are a million bad dates in the city that never sleeps. Mary Geneva has been on 999,999 of them. When she moved to Manhattan in her mid-20s, Mary imagined being single in New York City would be like something out of a Hollywood movie. And it was—a horror movie. Nicknames is a look at some of the most hopeless, horrendous, and frequently hilarious dates you can imagine. Mary shares her true-life adventures looking for Mr. Right in the treacherous New York dating scene. You'll meet men so bizarre their names have been changed to protect the guilty. Our cast of characters includes: Crazy Eyes, who didn't just resemble an escapee from the local mental hospital, but proved he probably belonged there; James Bond, the mysterious South African with the secret life; Germ Sperm, a guy so classy, he actually named himself Germ Sperm! And many, many, many more. Part memoir, part self-help book, Nicknames will have you laughing out loud... and possibly abstaining from dating forever.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at 3D printing and all the technological advances from biomedical engineering to printing in your home.
Starbucks wants baristas to help solve racism, the French government is attempting to block websites that promote terrorism, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at 3D printing and all the technological advances from biomedical engineering to printing in your home.
Parker Molloy joins us to discuss badly named make-up and trans-exclusive all women's colleges, Benjamin Netanyahu's ugly win in Israel, and students says adults just don't get it.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at 3D printing and all the technological advances from biomedical engineering to printing in your home.
Perpetual war is unlikely to end and we need to find ways to reign it in anyway, parent fundraising at wealthy public schools, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at 3D printing and all the technological advances from biomedical engineering to printing in your home.
Emanuel Sferios on MDMA the movie, protests in NYC around Cuomo's education agenda, and listener mail.
Australian artist Tega Brain is interested in re-imagining the systems, infrastructures, and networks that govern our technologically enhanced world. In her works she's converted data into smells, searched for signs of climate change in images on Flickr, and constructed a hybrid eco-system that joins a coin-operated laundromat with a miniature wetland. This in addition to many other playful and throughout provoking pieces that ask questions like: how much could you get for an ancient artifact from the Metropolitan Museum if it were listed on craigslist?
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at 3D printing and all the technological advances from biomedical engineering to printing in your home.
Does native advertising mean the death of outrage, Congress debates whether to authorize a 7-month-old war, and listener mail.
Joe Rumrill stops by for this episode of Spit Take Comedy and charms both George and his mom. This nice young man not only proves he has what it takes to be the first comedian featured on a Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade float, but also gives George's mom some nickname pointers. And, sadly, the crew lets George down...
You are under surveillance right now. Your cell phone provider tracks your location and knows who’s with you. Your online and in-store purchasing patterns are recorded, and reveal if you’re unemployed, sick, or pregnant. Your e-mails and texts expose your intimate and casual friends. Google knows what you’re thinking because it saves your private searches. Facebook can determine your sexual orientation without you ever mentioning it.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the changing landscape of universities in our world of information technology.
Hillary Clinton admits to deleting 30,000 emails from her private email system, the politics of media outlets publishing mugshots, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the changing landscape of universities in our world of information technology.
Morning Joe hosts blame rappers for racist frat boy chants, Lindy West's column on how frats perpetuate male domination, and continuing fallout from Tom Cotton's letter to Iran.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the changing landscape of universities in our world of information technology.
Ali Gharib joins us to discuss Senator Tom Cotton's letter to Iran, The Intercept reveals the CIA is attempting to break Apple's encryption, and David Brooks has some advice for poors.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the changing landscape of universities in our world of information technology.
Obama celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of the Selma march, thoughts on International Women's Day, and listener mail.
This week on the show my guest is artist Doug Young. Doug has just begun a new body of work of paintings on glass, using a technique called reverse painting. The images in Doug's paintings depict strange and fantastical places including a vintage Disneyland Attraction, a lethal injection room and a view of the Death Star's equatorial trench which Luke Skywalker famously navigates at the end of the film Star Wars.
This week the Daily Beat will be looking at the changing landscape of universities in our world of information technology.
The Department of Justice issues a scathing report on the Ferguson Police Department, examining Hillary Clinton's email problems, and feminism in the classroom.
A tense Western and an assured debut, Black River tells the story of a man marked by a prison riot as he returns to the town, and the convict, who shaped him.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the legalization of Medical Marijuana.
Elissa Eisenberg on how Gov Cuomo's teacher evaluation system will hurt students, Molly's new essay on growing up and growing old on the Internet, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the legalization of Medical Marijuana.
Jamil Smith joins us to discuss his latest article on how newspapers do or don't cover race, former general David Petraeus pleads guilty to one misdemeanor count of mishandling classified information, and listener mail about SIM cards.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the legalization of Medical Marijuana.
Laura Hanna joins us to discuss a new student debt strike, old and new abuses at Attica prison, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the legalization of Medical Marijuana.
Joel Handley joins us to discuss how Chicago police are using license plate readers and cell phone trackers, attempting to explain the Gemalto SIM card heist, and listener mail.
Creepiness by Adam Kotsko, Zero Books
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the legalization of Medical Marijuana.
On today's Radio Dispatch, we spend the hour with ONE PERSON, for the first time in our live show history. Rick Perlstein is the author of 3 literally epic books about Barry Goldwater, Richard Nixon, and Ronald Reagan, so get your puke buckets ready. We'll also talk about yesterday's election in Chicago, the Battering Rahm, and why Emmanuel's game may be faltering.
The inimitable Dave Rosinsky drops by for a spirited conversation with George that covers everything from his advanced karate skills to his former career as bassist for Smash Mouth. Things get really heated when George presses Dave on where exactly he hides his porn these days.
Brian Chen, Shane Harris, and Dave Crenshaw
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at NYC's attempt to compete with Silicon Valley with growing tech community.
Sarah Leonard joins us to discuss the rise of the left-wing Syriza in Greece, three men are arrested in Brooklyn for allegedly attempting to join ISIS, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at NYC's attempt to compete with Silicon Valley with growing tech community.
The dangers of using the word muscular to describe pro-war foreign policies, Taylor Swift donates $50,000 to NYC public schools, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at NYC's attempt to compete with Silicon Valley with growing tech community.
Naureen Shah joins us to discuss the flaws in Obama's countering violent extremism summit, the bizarre backstory of a GamerGate figure, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at NYC's attempt to compete with Silicon Valley with growing tech community.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. The theme for this month's show is "Addiction" and features Josh Sharp, Tara Clancy, Peter Aguero and Adam Wade.
Josh Eidelson joins us to discuss the almost-union at Volkswagen's plant in Tennessee, DHS head warns shoppers at the Mall of America to be extra safe, and the Oscars are super weird.
The documentary My Brooklyn, directed by this week's guest Kelly Anderson, examines the forces that are rapidly transforming the neighborhood of downtown Brooklyn, . The film centers around the Fulton Mall, a long-time African American and Caribbean shopping district that in the early 2000s was rezoned by the city to make way for luxury condos and chain retail stores. This rezoning, and others like it in the neighborhood, displaced many of the residents and small business who had been there for decades. At the same time, the development plan used public money to grant hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks and subsidies to wealthy residents and big developers.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at NYC's attempt to rival Silicon Valley with a growing tech community.
Cops continue a decades-long practice of surveilling and harassing methadone patients outside their clinics, and why feelings journalism must end.
It’s What I Do, What Pet Should I Get, and The Road Less Traveled
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the community garden protests in NYC.
A cop brings torture techniques from Chicago to Guantanamo, additional thoughts on Kanye West courtesy of Arthur Chu, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the community garden protests in NYC.
The US announces new rules to allow armed drone exports, a cis-gender woman argues that women's colleges are under attack by trans rights, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the community garden protests in NYC.
NYC charter school policy violates state and federal law, Beauty and the Beast, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the community garden protests in NYC.
Molly Crabapple joins us to discuss her latest series of sketches from an ISIS-controlled city in northern Iraq, an ISIS affiliate in Libya executes 21 Coptic Christians, and listener mail.
How would you go about writing a 1000-year long piece of music? Jem Finer has figured out at way to do just that. The artist, musician and founding member of the Pogues began thinking about the idea of a long-running artwork in the late 90s when culture had turned it's attention to the coming millennium. Jem found that among the hype and celebrations no one was really taking the time to think about what 1000 years actually meant. What is a millennium in terms of our every day lives? Why is it we give the passing of an arbitrary amount of time such significance? Longplayer is an attempt to get us to think aobut some of these questions. As a piece of music, Longplayer is constructed from a single 20 minute piece of source music, written for Tibetan singing bowls. When you listen to the piece you're actually hearing six tracks of this source music playing simultaneously. Each version proceeds through the source score at a different speed and according to different rules, creating an ebb and flow of tones, harmonies that Jem likens to changes in the weather. After 1000 years the six simultaneous tracks will come together again and start the next 1000 year cycle.
Brendan McLaughlin drops by to chat with George about his recent appearance in Wasted Frasier, as well as being named one of the Top 1000 Comedians of 2014. Brendan, who has written for MTV and Best Week Ever, offers some writing advice and plays a fun round of “The Replacements Game.”
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at the community garden protests in NYC.
Sarah Jeong joins us to discuss the recently concluded Silk Road trial, night raids surge in Afghanistan, David Carr is dead at 58, and listener mail.
The Other Side of The Wall is a paranormal memoir/psychological thriller set in Venice, Italy. The stories deal with the duality of life, light and dark. I believe that the light always is there and prevails if you let it. As humans we feel and experience it all. We understand one by the presence of the other. I have also expanded on many of the beautiful aspects of life-hope, belief, love, magic, self-empowerment, a higher power, angels, ghosts, humor, and the power in “giving.”
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at civic data hacking and the strive to create more transparency on government websites.
Alexis Goldstein joins us to discuss the latest accusations against international bank HSBC, Obama calls for another limitless war, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at civic data hacking and the strive to create more transparency on government websites.
Ayesha Siddiqi joins us to discuss the killing of three Muslims in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, by a white self-described anti-theist. Also, US lawmakers desperately want to send lethal arms to Ukraine, and listener mail.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at civic data hacking and the strive to create more transparency on government websites.
Mychal Denzel Smith is back to discuss what's wrong about the ways people hate Kanye West and Marshawn Lynch. Also, Better Call Saul starts off strong, an essay from a writer with autism on the anti-vaccine movement, and listener mail.
Obama lays out his new national security agenda, and a ton of listener mail.
Artist Fernando Orellana may have invented a device to help ghosts reconnect with the world of the living. In a new project called Shadows Fernando is designing interactive devices for the ghosts of the recently deceased. He calls them "techno effigies." To make these devices, Fernando visits estate sales and picks a single item that he feels may have been important to the person recently passed. Then he constructs the device to help the ghost use the object. For example, one device called Her Bell is equipped with a simple mechanism that rings the brass bell Fernando found at the home of a deceased bell collector. To detect the presence of ghosts, Fernando's devices continuously monitors the immediate environment for changes in temperature, infrared light, and electromagnetic waves --- factors believed by paranormal researchers to indicate the presence of a spirit. If a a ghost is detected, the device is triggered.
This week on the Daily Beat will be looking at civic data hacking and the strive to create more transparency on government websites.
Phillip Anderson joins us to discuss the fallout after Sheldon Silver's indictment on corruption charges, fewer graduates are joining Teach for America, and listener mail. Also, a huge announcement from the land of Radio Dispatch.
The Structure of Scientific Revolutions focuses on conceptual issues like the practice of “Normal Science,” influence of historical events, emergence of scientific discoveries, nature of scientific revolutions and progress through scientific revolutions. Kuhn's book argues that the evolution of scientific theory does not emerge from the straightforward accumulation of facts, but rather from a set of changing intellectual circumstances and possibilities.
This week is Disruptive Week at BreakThru Radio, the Daily Beat will be investigating gentrification.
News presenter Brian Williams lied for years about being in a helicopter that had been shot down in Iraq, what the new nominee for Secretary of Defense might mean for Guantanamo, and listener mail.
This week is Disruptive Week at BreakThru Radio, the Daily Beat will be investigating gentrification.
Nick Pinto joins us to discuss his Rolling Stone story on the Albuquerque Police Department's violent history, what does the collective revulsion at ISIS's latest execution say about the US, and listener mail.
This week is Disruptive Week at BreakThru Radio, the Daily Beat will be investigating gentrification.
Arun Kundnani joins us to discuss the response in Europe to the Charlie Hebdo shooting, Chris Christie's hypocrisy on public health, and listener mail.
This week is Disruptive Week at BreakThru Radio, the Daily Beat will be investigating gentrification.
Cora Currier joins us to discuss attempts in St Paul and Minneapolis to use community outreach programs to spy on Muslim communities, anti-vaccine parents will be the death of us all, and a bunch of listener mail.
This week on the show U.K.-based artist Sig Waller joins me to talk about her collage work and paintings. Through the use of found images and dark humor, Sig says her work explores the "dark corners of cultural excess" and asks the question, "How will future intelligence make sense of our times?"
This week is Disruptive Week at BreakThru Radio, the Daily Beat will be investigating gentrification.
Jeff Abbott joins us from Guatemala to discuss the Central American Free Trade Agreement and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, Bratton announces the formation of a new NYPD unit that equates protest with terrorism, and listener mail.
Reid Faylor is not only a comedian, but a national treasure of absurdity. In this episode of Spit Take Comedy he sits down with George to discuss his web series The Undone Sweaters, working in the flavor industry and despised fonts. Then George and Reid play a new game called "The Relax Off.”
When Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans, Abdulrahman Zeitoun, a prosperous Syrian-American and father of four, chose to stay through the storm to protect his house and contracting business. In the days after the storm, he traveled the flooded streets in a secondhand canoe, passing on supplies and helping those he could. A week later, on September 6, 2005, Zeitoun abruptly disappeared.
This week, the Daily Beat will be tackling the growing national student debt.
Todd Miller joins us to discuss the Israeli border security company helping to up-armor the border between the US and Mexico, the US government has begun classifying virtually every element of Afghan reconstruction, and listener mail with Molly from the past.
This week, the Daily Beat will be tackling the growing national student debt.
Maysoon Zayid joins us to discuss Palestine's move to join the International Criminal Court, the myth of terrorist safe havens, Jonathan Chait has been silenced by being given a huge platform, and listener mail.
This week, the Daily Beat will be tackling the growing national student debt.
Bryce Covert joins us to discuss President Obama's economic policies as laid out in his State of the Union, the FBI disrupts a Russian spy ring, and former CIA operative Jeffrey Sterling is found guilty of espionage, and listener mail.
This week, the Daily Beat tackles the growing national student debt.
The best of the best comedians and writers in New York get together at the end of every month to share their wild and crazy stories, hosted by David Martin. This month's theme is "Religion" and features Anna Roisman, David Bluvband, Josh Sharp and Adam Wade.
How to fix America's broken juvenile justice system, plus more thoughts on what the Sheldon Silver arrest means for New York's public schools.
Jenny Vogel is a new media artist working in video, photography, printmaking, performance and installation. She's interested in the world as seen through communication technology --- web cameras, morse code, fax machines --- and the way we use these tools to overcome distance, alienation and loneliness. Her work exposes the glitches and limitations of technology and reveals the strange miscommunications it can produce. Jenny is especially interested in the video feeds from web cameras that are placed in city centers and homes around the world. These cameras broadcast ghostly pictures of places that seem to be devoid of human activity, and Jenny uses images from these broadcasts to construct her own narratives in her videos and prints.
This week, the Daily Beat will be tackling the growing national student debt.
Yemen descends into chaos, Lindy West says Billy Crystal is wrong about Hollywood, and a horrifying story in the New York Times about animal experimentation.
Drawing on his own battles with post-traumatic stress, David J. Morris — a war correspondent and former Marine — has written a humane, unforgettable book that will sit beside The Noonday Demon and The Emperor of All Maladies as the essential account of an illness.  Through interviews with people living with PTSD; forays into the rich scientific, literary, and cultural history of the condition; and memoir, Morris crafts a moving work that will speak not only to those with PTSD and their loved ones, but to all of us struggling to make sense of an anxious and uncertain time.
This week on the beat: The Daily Beat will be tackling the affordable housing crisis.
Cuomo's terrible education agenda, Darren Wilson won't face charges from DOJ, Sheldon Silver is arrested by the feds on corruption charges, and the new Senate Intelligence Committee chairman wants the torture report back.
Today on the Daily Beat: We will be tackling the affordable housing crisis.
Alex Pareene joins us to discuss President Obama's state of the union speech, and we take a look at some of the policies Obama laid out.
This week on the Daily Beat: We will be tackling the affordable housing crisis.
Reflections on James Risen's Pay Any Price, MLK day at after school, and Gov Cuomo says he wants to raise the minimum wage in New York.
This week, the Daily Beat will be tackling the affordable housing crisis.
Racial justice and civil rights activist Linda Sarsour and Vince Warren, the executive director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, join us for what might be our best Radio Dispatch live ever. We discuss Muslim surveillance, Black Lives Matter, and the aftermath of the Paris shooting.
Since ancient times, humans have been making images as a way to understand the cosmos. Our illustrations, maps, diagrams and paintings are a way of bringing the infinite into the realm of our senses, with the hope that, through picturing the heavens, we can understand how the universe works and our place in it.
George kicks off a fresh new season of Spit Take Comedy with the very funny Taylor Clark. Not only has Taylor hilariously hosted great Brooklyn comedy shows like Castle Comedy and Big Ups, but he's also recently become a new dad. Taylor recounts the birth of his child and George quizzes him on his baby smarts, but they also delve into the wild world of extreme skateboarding.
Today's top stories: Pakistan protests, Chinese corruption, and more.
An Ohio man is arrested under dubious circumstances after allegedly threatening to attack the US capitol, a report argues that requiring kindergarteners to read is harmful, and listener mail.
After losing her mother to breast cancer and having an absent father, Danielle Pashko was living as a teenager on her own in Manhattan. She worked as a model to support herself, although much of her free time was spent studying yoga, massage, holistic nutrition, and healing modalities.
Today's top stories feature new Israeli defense system, intensities in Ukraine, and more.
The Oscar nominations are so white it hurts, a terrifying number of men say they would rape someone, and listener mail.
Today's top stories: Pope says free expression is limited, low crude oil prices confuse Banks and more.
Mike Konczal joins us to discuss President Obama's proposal to offer two years of free community college to some students, and French authorities arrest an offensive comedian after an offensive facebook post.
Today's top stories: AlQaeda leaders taking responsibility, nuclear talks in Iran, and more.
Phillip Anderson joins us to discuss the candidate running for Michael Grim's seat in Staten Island, Joe Scarborough is outraged at a BBC journalist for invoking the suffering of Palestinians, and listener mail.
Today's top stories: Mobilization of Russian troops, Declining Russian economy, and more.
Over a million people march in France following the shooting at Charlie Hebdo, new reports suggest former top general David Petraeus could face criminal charges for leaking classified information, and listener mail.
New York-based artist Ross Racine creates aerial views of fictional suburban landscapes. This month his work is part of an upcoming exhibition at the International Print Center in New York. I met with Ross to look over some of his prints and talk about his drawing technique and his interest in aerial views and suburban geography.
Today's top stories: Egypt overturns Mubarak, economic slowdown of Britain, and Pope in Sri Lanka.
Bill Maher and Don Lemon channel the worst in punditry, NYC courts get quiet following the NYPD work slowdown, and listener mail and tweets.
Even in a parallel universe, Cleveland is still the world capital of sporting misery. So, imagine the forlorn city’s surprise when their long-suffering RFC football team is on the receiving end of the ultimate Hail Mary. It’s pure pandemonium in Brunts Stadium with just seconds to play, as the home team is on the brink of beating archrival Pittsburgh to reach the playoffs. But that’s where CIRCUS CATCH takes the strangest bounce of all time.
Today's top stories feature the killings of two Paris terrorists, transgenders banned from driving in Russia and more.
Cartoonist Susie Cagle joins us to discuss the shooting at the office of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, the drone rules in Afghanistan stay the same despite the formal end of the war, and free speech is under attack in the US following the shooting of two NYPD officers.
Today's top stories follow the search for terrorists in Paris, violent Bangladesh protests, measles outbreak in Disney theme park.
An attack at a satirical newspaper in Paris leaves 12 dead, an attack on an NAACP building in Colorado luckily doesn't kill anybody, and listener mail.
Today's top stories feature the terrorist attack in France, AirAsia jet tail found, and US upgrading tactical missiles.
More thoughts on what the formal end of the US war in Afghanistan does and doesn't mean, NYPD commissioner Bill Bratton says Broken Windows is good policy despite recent evidence to the contrary, and listener mail from the break.
You've just tuned in to The Daily Beat! The Daily Beat is a daily news podcast! Tune in Monday through Friday at 7 p.m. hosted by Lisa Autz as she culls web bringing the top international and national news of the day. Not to mention, we'll also feature some of BTR's top tracks. Don't miss a beat! 00:00 The Daily Beat Intro 00:33 The Daily Beat pt. 1 04:25 PROMO 05:05 The Daily Beat pt. 2 08:26 PROMO 09:10 The Daily Beat pt. 3 10:15 Didn't it rain - Cross the Road 15:20 Finish It's your daily news roundup courtesy of BTR! Today on the beat: GOP takes charge as new congress convenes, gay couples marry in Florida, and postponed SpaceX launch. GOP takes charge as new congress convenes Gay marriage ban ends as couples wed throughout Florida Islamic State 'police' official beheaded: Syria monitor Thai PM urges action on human trafficking as U.S. deadline looms Rocket problem postpones SpaceX launch to space station
Frontline's Michael Kirk joins us to discuss his latest documentary on the NRA and gun violence in America. Also, it's been a weird few weeks for the NYPD, and the war in Afghanistan kind of ended.
Brian Belott makes collages, collects found audio, and is an all around great and talented dude. A while back he invited me to over to his studio in Brooklyn to hang out, chat, and listen to some of the audio in his collection. We talked about collages, Michael jackson, cassette tapes and lots of other good stuff. While you listen do yourself a favor and spend some time on his website.
Today we look at Indonesia's attempt to crack down on aviation sector, Lebanon's changing refugee policies, and the jury selection for the Boston Bombing trail.
Revisiting our amazing interview with Maya Schenwar on her new book Locked Down, Locked Out, on why prisons don't work. Also, listener mail.
You've just tuned in to The Daily Beat! The Daily Beat is a daily news podcast inspired by the power of social media to spark social change. Tune in Monday through Friday at 7 p.m. as BTR's social media director, DJ Jen, culls the "Twitterverse" and "blogosphere" to bring you the top stories regarding social justice and human rights issues. Not to mention, we'll also feature some of BTR's top tracks. Don't miss a beat! 00:00 The Daily Beat Intro 00:45 The Daily Beat pt. 1 04:17 PROMO 04:32 The Daily Beat pt. 2 06:40 PROMO 06:55 The Daily Beat pt. 3 11:04 Rokkurro - The Backbone 15:31 Finish It's your daily news roundup courtesy of BTR! Today on the beat: The Daily Beat's Year in Review featuring your new host Lisa Autz.
We revisit our amazing interview with Ayesha Siddiqi on Kanye West, and spend a bunch of time on listener mail.
We celebrate the New Year by re-airing part 2 of our live show with Jeremy Scahill and Ryan Devereaux, and reading listener mail.

recommendations