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This week on the show, Alex Handy talks about the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment, a non-profit based in Oakland, California.The museum houses a growing collection of historic video games and digital ephemera. It’s mission is to preserve these games and educate the public about how video games are made and why they deserve the same artistic status as films or painting.
A few weeks ago I was on vacation and I went into a deli to use the ATM. I swiped my card and then the strangest thing happened. When the ATM did it’s “connecting” thing to verify my information, out of nowhere came a loud ping, chime and crackle. It was a sound I hadn’t heard in years, but one that I instantly recognized. The sound of a dial up modem. I guess this ATM still used a 56k modem to do it’s transactions. It was an odd sound to encounter because I didn’t realize having dial-up was even an option in 2012. This got me thinking about all the other sounds that have gone extinct with the advance of technology. Things like analog television static, a metal hammer striking a bell when a telephone rings. All these sounds that were once such an inescapable part of our sonic environment are just vanishing from the world.
My guest on the show this week is Alex Handy. He is the founder of the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment, a non-profit based in Oakland, California.The museum houses a growing collection of historic video games and digital ephemera. It’s mission is to preserve these games and educate the public about how video games are made and why they deserve the same artistic status as films or painting.

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