Artist
Sun Araw
Latest
Los Angeles bands, punk, shoe-gaze and tons of new music on the show today including Sarah Bethe Nelson and Mr Elevator and the Brain Hotel
Happy Weird Wednesday! On today’s God Bless Weirdmerica, we start off with what is technically, I suppose, a hip-hop track from Blood Orange (aka Lightspeed Champion aka Devonte Hynes), but I think his amazing blend of electronic elements make it an excellent candidate for an out-of-genre experience. Plus, new music from deColalge and No One Mind, and old favorites like Dan Deacon.
Happy Weird Wednesday! It’s God Bless Weirdmerica, and it’s time for another strange set of great music. This is the show where we play freak folk, New Weird America, psychedelic and any songs that just don’t a genre, like our friends on the show today dunkelbunt. We’ve also got a very psychedelic track from Sun Araw, and some dreamy pop folk from Deradoorian. And don’t forget to follow BTR on Facebook, Twitter, tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram, and SoundCloud.
Happy Halloween!!! I’ve put together a very spooky Halloween show for you today. If you want the type of sexy costume Halloween, then this show is not for you. If you want a creepy, spooky, are spirits real kind of Halloween, then you’re definitely going to want to put this on on your party. We’ve got songs like Killr Punx, Scary Demons, Blood Runs, and the very Halloween Chicken Shit. So let’s get spooky, today on BTR!
It’s probably the last week all in 2015 (and a good portion of 2016) that we’re going to see 70 degrees, so I put together a nice, breezy playlist in celebration. We’ve got a lot of electronic sounds on the show today that are perfect to space out to while you’re taking a walk enjoying what’s left of the not-terrible weather! And as always, don’t forget to follow BTR on Facebook, Twitter, tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram, and Sound Cloud!
In his book, Disappearance of Darkness: Photography at the End of the Analog Age, Robert Burley documents the infrastructure that for nearly 100 years supported film photography. Robert was granted access to shuddered film factories to photograph the massive machines and interior spaces where thousands of workers once made film in total darkness. He visited Dwanye's photo lab in Kansas: the last photo lab in the world to process Kodak's iconic Kodachrome film. And, for the most dramatic pictures in the book, Robert photographed the demolitions of film manufacturing buildings at Kodak's headquarters in Rochester New York.

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