Artist
Pylon
Latest
This week on the show U.K.-based artist Sig Waller joins me to talk about her collage work and paintings. Through the use of found images and dark humor, Sig says her work explores the "dark corners of cultural excess" and asks the question, "How will future intelligence make sense of our times?"
Sculptor Hannah Herr works with materials like hair, rubber bands, cell phone chargers, tinsel and animal flesh to create objects visually inspired by the adornments of voodoo dancers and the Masai people. Her work explores the Western gaze and the ways it perpetuates fetishized otherness. Hannah is also the co-founder of Daughters Rising, a non-profit that works with woman artisans in Nepal, Thailand and Mexico.
We've all been on Google Earth and used it's satellite view or street view tools to get directions, find our way around a new city or just explore. My guest, artist Jenny Odell, has taken these tools a step further to use them as the subject of her work. Odell scrolls around Google Satellite view collecting images of uniquely man-made structures — like swimming pools, parking lots and landfills — and arranges them on large prints, a way of re-examining the human-built landscape from the very inhuman perspective of a satellite's remote camera.
Imagine yourself on a roller coaster. You're towed up to the top of the first drop, over 500 meters off the ground -- taller than the empire state building. and you're presented with a button. If you decide you still want to go, you push it. As you fall nine times the force of gravity pins you to your seat and begins to force the air form your lungs. As you enter the first of seven 360 degree vertical loops the blood rushes to your lower extremities and you begin to experience tunnel vision. A sense of euphoria sets in, as your brain -- due to a lack of oxygen -- diverts its efforts to sustaining essential bodily functions. Color slowly drains from your vision, and by the end of the second loop you've lost consciousness. Five loops on the coaster remain, but by the time the third is complete, you're dead.
Photographer Brian Rose has been documenting New York City with his large format camera since the early 1980s. In his book Time and Space on the Lower East Side, Brian explored how we experience and come to terms with change, or lack of it, in the urban environment. It collects photographs taken on the streets of New York City's Lower East Side in the years 1980 and 2010. Now, over those 30 years, the Lower East Side has gone from being a symbol of urban blight and decay to a poster-child for urban renewal and gentrification.
I first came across the work of week's guest Jesse Hulcher's at Interstate Projects here in Brooklyn, where he had a video piece involving the film Jurassic Park. Now, apparently, the newest version of iMovie --Apple's popular video editing software --- has a preset called Jurassic Park trailer, that is supposed to take home video footage and transform it into a blockbuster trailer complete with music, quick cuts and all the rest. So, for his piece, Jesse followed the program's instructions and took clips from the actual Jurassic park to see how well the software could assemble the footage from the film it claimed to mimic.

recommendations