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For the several years photographer Daniel Cronin attended The Gathering of the Juggalos, an annual festival for die-hard fans of the horrorcore rap group The Insane Clown Posse. In his photographs, Daniel depicts Juggalos of every stripe, likening his approach to that of early 20th century German photographer August Sander who made egalitarian portraits of his countrymen. These photographs have been published in a book by Prestel, and I spoke with Daniel over the phone from Portland about his experiences at Gathering, misconceptions about Juggalo culture and some of his other projects.
My guest this week is Antwerp-based photographer Jan Kempenaers. Jan broke out on the photography scene in 2010 when he published a book called Spomenik. The book documents the giant geometric sculptures that were built across the countryside of the former Yugoslavia in the 60s and 70 as monuments to various sites and battles from World War Two. Jan traveled to these isolated sites to photograph these alien-looking sculptures. Before Jan’s project these monuments were largely unknown except to the people in the small towns where they’re located.
New York-based artist Ross Racine creates aerial views of fictional suburban landscapes. This month his work is part of an upcoming exhibition at the International Print Center in New York. I met with Ross to look over some of his prints and talk about his drawing technique and his interest in aerial views and suburban geography.
Brooklyn based painter Hiro Kurata paints hallucinatory scenes and portraits that revolve around a single character — a baseball player wearing thick black and white pin stripes that he calls the Slugger. His works take the slugger through surreal worlds rendered in vibrant colors and populated by sumo wrestlers, samurai warriors and greek gods. Hiro grew up in Japan, but moved to Chicago as a kid. For him baseball was important not so much as a sport, but as a cultural bridge between his two homes.
Over the last decade Gregory Crewdson has become a household name in contemporary art for his large-scale staged photographs. The creation of just one Crewdson photograph requires the work of over 50 crew members including actors, electricians, set designers and a cinematographer. The artist shoots on location in sleepy towns in Western Massachewsettes, often shutting down entire city blocks to use as his set.
Sundays with DJ Drew on BTR

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