Artist
Max Tundra
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Jonathan Monaghan makes short films that combine high end computer animation, with surreal and fantastical scenes drawn from religious themes, popular culture and history. In one of his pieces we watch a polar bear that resembles one of those from the popular coca-cola ad campaign, slowly staggering around in a shapeless black space, only to realize after three minutes, that we've been watching the bear as it slowly dies. Another piece, which Jonathan discusses on the show, features a lion, a black eagle, some medical devices, and a beheading. His piece Escape Pod was shown as part of a solo show at Bitforms Gallery here in New York.
In her work, artist Carmen Tiffany combines experiences from her childhood in rural Wyoming with the aggressively cheerful imagery of children's products, television and advertising. The result are funny, grotesque videos, installations and drawings that feature an array of characters including a rapping macaroni noodle and lisa frank characters with an unquenchable thirst for moonshine.
This week on Art Uncovered a conversation with artist Carrie Mae Rose. I visited her at her Bushwick studio to talk about her interest in fashion, technology and the interactive wearable sculptures she makes from items confiscated at airport security. Carrie Mae has exhibited around the United States, and she is currently a Computational Fashion Fellow at Eyebeam.
This week on Art Uncovered Italian curator Domenico Quaranta talks about his exhibition Collect the WWWorld: The Artist or Archivist. For Collect the World Domenico has assembled a group of artists who appropriate, re-mix, collect and manipulate the cultural material of the web in an attempt to hold up a mirror up to our always-connected information society. These artists try to figure out what to make of the deluge of data, videos, images, text, social networking, and e-commerce that have reshaped our lives. The question that emerges from this show is whether the flood of information actually leads to knowledge and meaning or confusion, anxiety and identity crisis. The answer I got from the videos, installations, objects and other works in the show was all of the above. Last Sunday I spoke with curator Domenico Quaranta over Skype about Collect the World which is on view through November 4th at 319 Scholes in Brooklyn. Playlist 00:00 Thomas Intro 02:03 Domenico Quaranta Interview pt 1 04:20 Totally Stoked (On You) - Y.A.C.H.T. 06:19 Domenico Quaranta Interview pt 2 08:35 Slow With Horns Run For Your Life - Dan Deacon 11:14 Domenico Quaranta Interview pt 3 13:37 Comfy in Nautica - Panda Bear 16:42 Domenico Quaranta Interview pt 4 21:07 The Entertainment - Max Tundra 24:05 Domenico Quaranta Interview pt 5 27:51 The Struggle Against Unreality - Matmos 30:33 Domenico Quaranta Interview pt 6 34:50 Outro/Luke Vibert  - Thurston Moore 36:23 Finish
A few weeks ago I was on vacation and I went into a deli to use the ATM. I swiped my card and then the strangest thing happened. When the ATM did it's "connecting" thing to verify my information, out of nowhere came a loud ping, chime and crackle. It was a sound I hadn't heard in years, but one that I instantly recognized. The sound of a dial up modem. I guess this ATM still used a 56k modem to do it's transactions. It was an odd sound to encounter because I didn't realize having dial-up was even an option in 2012. This got me thinking about all the other sounds that have gone extinct with the advance of technology. Things like analog television static, a metal hammer striking a bell when a telephone rings. All these sounds that were once such an inescapable part of our sonic environment are just vanishing from the world.
Ralph Pugay's paintings depict scenes from everyday life that have been turned on their heads, and infused with humor, heavy doses of the absurd, and a general sense of existential dread. He mines ideas from philosophy, pop culture, and conversations with friends to inspire these bizarre scenes that in some ways are reminiscent of Gary Larson's Far Side comics for their use of both visual and verbal plays on words. However, Ralph's colorful tableaus seem like they're most interested in the sincere yet often futile ways that us humans try to control the unpredictable and unforgiving world that we live in.

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