Artist
John Fahey
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In his book, Disappearance of Darkness: Photography at the End of the Analog Age, Robert Burley documents the infrastructure that for nearly 100 years supported film photography. Robert was granted access to shuddered film factories to photograph the massive machines and interior spaces where thousands of workers once made film in total darkness. He visited Dwanye's photo lab in Kansas: the last photo lab in the world to process Kodak's iconic Kodachrome film. And, for the most dramatic pictures in the book, Robert photographed the demolitions of film manufacturing buildings at Kodak's headquarters in Rochester New York.
Jenny Vogel is a new media artist working in video, photography, printmaking, performance and installation. She's interested in the world as seen through communication technology --- web cameras, morse code, fax machines --- and the way we use these tools to overcome distance, alienation and loneliness. Her work exposes the glitches and limitations of technology and reveals the strange miscommunications it can produce. Jenny is especially interested in the video feeds from web cameras that are placed in city centers and homes around the world. These cameras broadcast ghostly pictures of places that seem to be devoid of human activity, and Jenny uses images from these broadcasts to construct her own narratives in her videos and prints.
Los Angeles-based artist Aspen Mays uses science as a lens to explore the vexing and unanswerable questions of life: Questions about the the limits of knowledge, the nature of existence and feelings of cosmic loneliness. Many of Aspen's projects are realized with the help of scientists and other experts. She worked with the Adler planetarium in Chicago to send a lawnchair and a digital camera up to the edge of Earth's atmosphere. For another project called Sun Ruins she hung out with astrophysicists at an observatory in Chilie and made work using discarded prints and negatives she found in their abandoned darkroom.
Photographer Emil Hartvig is based in Copenhagen, but recently he came to the United States and traveled through the Midwest to photograph the Prepper movement. Preppers subscribe to an extreme kind of disaster preparedness. They're not setting aside a few bottles of water or a flashlight in case the power goes out. Preppers are preparing for the end of the world as we know it. Whether its economic collapse, civil unrest, or a biological or nuclear attack, the Prepper movement is all about having the means to be self sufficient and protect yourself when the shit hits the fan.
Over the last decade Gregory Crewdson has become a household name in contemporary art for his large-scale staged photographs. The creation of just one Crewdson photograph requires the work of over 50 crew members including actors, electricians, set designers and a cinematographer. The artist shoots on location in sleepy towns in Western Massachewsettes, often shutting down entire city blocks to use as his set.
Sharon Louden is an artist, educator and the editor of the book Living and Sustaining a Creative Life: 40 Essays By Working Artists. For the book, Sharon asked 40 working artists to write about how they make a living in the art world.

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