Artist
High Places
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Photographer Liz Nielsen works in a room above a boxing gym that is just as much a laboratory as it is an artist's studio. The room is filled with colored gels, fiber optic lights, stacks of photo paper and a box with a label that says "disco balls and rainbow machine." These items and more are what Liz uses for her photographic experiments, and the prints that result from her visual investigations into light and color are pinned up all over the studio walls. There are abstract photographs depicting colored geometrical forms floating against pure black backgrounds, circular images of what appear to be deep space, and an assortment of collages and other seemingly photographic works, some clearly successful experiments others still on the drawing board. Liz is interested most of all by color and specifically the physics of color, from the ways that colors can be manipulated in the dark room, to the ancient light from outer space seen only through deep space telescopes.
Artist Wendy Klemperer makes sculpture of animals. The creatures in her work are amazingly expressive and convey complex movement and emotion that reflects the hours wendy has spent observing animals in the wild, in nature films and in the works of other artists like the painter Delacroix and photographer Eadward Muybridge.
Since the civil war in Syria began two and a half years ago, nearly two million Syrians have fled the country. About half a million of them have fled to Jordan, Syria's neighbor to the south, where they have passed through refugee camps and been absorbed into the Jordanian population.
Last summer, my guest photographer Benjamin Rasmussen went to Jordan along with photographer Michael Friberg to meet some of these Syrian refugees living in Jordan. With the help of local journalists Benjamin and Michael photographed refugees' daily lives, and recorded interviews with them telling their stories. They're calling the project By the Olive Trees. Benjamin and Michael are currently working on a newsprint publication of their photographs and interviews that will be distributed for free.
This week on the show is artist Mary Mattingly. Mary's work combines photography, sculpture, architecture and ecology to bring us visions of a post-apocaliptic future -- as well as, most importantly, some ideas for how we might survive such a future, or avoid it all together. With works like her wearable homes and The Waterpod Project --- a self-sufficient floating artist habitat built on a recycled barge ---- Mary's work offers imaginative and visually stunning experiments in living based on ideas of community, sustainability and individual freedom. Mary's upcoming solo exhibition is called Mary Mattingly: House and Universe, and it opens at Robert Mann gallery on September 6th.
Mark 2, Stanford Linear Accelerator, California This week on the show: photographer Stanley Greenberg. Stanley has made his career photographing the visible, and invisible, parts of the built world He has photographed the hidden tunnels, aqueducts and tanks of new york's water system, gained access to photograph the construction of buildings by some of the world's most famous architects, and most recently, has been traveling around the world to places like Switzerland, Japan and the North Pole to photograph particle accelerators and other exotic high energy physics experiments. Stanley has published numerous books of his photographs including Invisible New York: The Hidden Infrastructure of the City, and Architecture Under Construction. His most recent book is called Time Machines and features a selection of his particle accelerator photographs.

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