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It's time to kick Fall into action on BTR's Roadside Assistance, presented by United Airlines! Listen as 8 different BTR DJs present 8 different interpretations on what kind of soundtrack goes best with the beginning of the Fall season
Thundercat. Flying Lotus. Ava Luna. Katie Dey. Grass Widow. Juan Wauters. Upsetters. Thee Oh Sees. Rsmg. And more...
Photographer Tessa Traeger has been using a trove of victorian glass negatives to create her new project The Chemistry of light. For the project she rephotographed these old plate negatives as still lives using natural light and mirrors to highlight the dramatic forms of chemical decay that have transformed the negatives over their hundred plus years in storage. The result are ghostly, dreamlike views of Victorian England. Some photographs in the project show everyday scenes like a crowd at the beach. Other images are abstractions in which the negative's curled or damaged emulation creates a rainbow of color and folds of texture that nearly obscure the photograph's subject. According to Tessa, the Chemistry of Light project is also about photography itself. She says that as chemical processes give way to digital technology, her collection of damaged and decaying photographs serve as a metaphor for the death of analog photography as a medium.
Julia Haslett is the director of the documentary An Encounter with Simone Weil. The film tells the story of French Philosopher and activist Simone Weil, who spent her short yet prolific life grappling with a single question: What response does seeing human suffering demand of us? Before making this film Julia had never hear of Simone Weil, but she was familiar with this question. She grew up watching her father struggle with depression, and when Julia was 17 he took his own life. The suicide left her acutely sensitive to people in pain, but it was many years later that Julia read these words that would lead her to make her latest film. This week I speak with Julia Haslett about the life of Simone Weil and how the philosopher inspired this personal documentary.
San Francisco based photographer Jin Zhu's project Endless Stream looks at California's Central Valley. Jin has been documenting the ways that water --- and lack of it --- transforms the landscape and the ways that humans live on the land.
Photographer Liz Nielsen works in a room above a boxing gym that is just as much a laboratory as it is an artist's studio. The room is filled with colored gels, fiber optic lights, stacks of photo paper and a box with a label that says "disco balls and rainbow machine." These items and more are what Liz uses for her photographic experiments, and the prints that result from her visual investigations into light and color are pinned up all over the studio walls. There are abstract photographs depicting colored geometrical forms floating against pure black backgrounds, circular images of what appear to be deep space, and an assortment of collages and other seemingly photographic works, some clearly successful experiments others still on the drawing board. Liz is interested most of all by color and specifically the physics of color, from the ways that colors can be manipulated in the dark room, to the ancient light from outer space seen only through deep space telescopes.

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